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Title: Hubble Space Telescope Imaging of the Ultra-compact High Velocity Cloud AGC 226067: A Stripped Remnant in the Virgo Cluster

Abstract

We analyze the optical counterpart to the ultra-compact high velocity cloud AGC 226067, utilizing imaging taken with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) on the Hubble Space Telescope . The color–magnitude diagram of the main body of AGC 226067 reveals an exclusively young stellar population, with an age of ∼7–50 Myr, and is consistent with a metallicity of [Fe/H] ∼ −0.3 as previous work has measured via H ii region spectroscopy. Additionally, the color–magnitude diagram is consistent with a distance of D ≈ 17 Mpc, suggesting an association with the Virgo cluster. A secondary stellar system located ∼1.′6 (∼8 kpc) away in projection has a similar stellar population. The lack of an old red giant branch (≳5 Gyr) is contrasted with a serendipitously discovered Virgo dwarf in the ACS field of view (Dw J122147+132853), and the total diffuse light from AGC 226067 is consistent with the luminosity function of the resolved ∼7–50 Myr stellar population. The main body of AGC 226067 has a M {sub V} = −11.3 ± 0.3, or M {sub stars} = 5.4 ± 1.3 × 10{sup 4} M {sub ⊙} given the stellar population. We searched 20 deg{sup 2} of imaging data adjacent to AGC 226067more » in the Virgo Cluster, and found two similar stellar systems dominated by a blue stellar population, far from any massive galaxy counterpart—if this population has star-formation properties that are similar to those of AGC 226067, it implies ∼0.1 M {sub ⊙} yr{sup −1} in Virgo intracluster star formation. Given its unusual stellar population, AGC 226067 is likely a stripped remnant and is plausibly the result of compressed gas from the ram pressure stripped M86 subgroup (∼350 kpc away in projection) as it falls into the Virgo Cluster.« less

Authors:
;  [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5]; ;  [6];  [7];  [8];  [9];  [10];  [11]
  1. Texas Tech University, Physics and Astronomy Department, Box 41051, Lubbock, TX 79409-1051 (United States)
  2. Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States)
  3. Royal Military College of Canada, Department of Physics, P.O. Box 17000, Station Forces, Kingston, Ontario, K7K 7B4 (Canada)
  4. Center for Data Intensive and Time Domain Astronomy, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, 567 Wilson Road, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)
  5. ASTRON, Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy, Postbus 2, 7900 AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands)
  6. Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)
  7. UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)
  8. Yale University Astronomy Department, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States)
  9. Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States)
  10. Department of Physics, University of the Pacific, 3601 Pacific Avenue, Stockton, CA 95211 (United States)
  11. Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22663403
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 843; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; CLOUDS; COMPACTS; GALAXIES; GALAXY CLUSTERS; LUMINOSITY; METALLICITY; SPACE; STARS; SUPERNOVA REMNANTS; TELESCOPES; VELOCITY; VISIBLE RADIATION

Citation Formats

Sand, D. J., Crnojević, D., Seth, A. C., Spekkens, K., Strader, J., Adams, E. A. K., Caldwell, N., Randall, S., Guhathakurta, P., Kenney, J., Simon, J. D., Toloba, E., and Willman, B., E-mail: david.sand@ttu.edu. Hubble Space Telescope Imaging of the Ultra-compact High Velocity Cloud AGC 226067: A Stripped Remnant in the Virgo Cluster. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/AA7557.
Sand, D. J., Crnojević, D., Seth, A. C., Spekkens, K., Strader, J., Adams, E. A. K., Caldwell, N., Randall, S., Guhathakurta, P., Kenney, J., Simon, J. D., Toloba, E., & Willman, B., E-mail: david.sand@ttu.edu. Hubble Space Telescope Imaging of the Ultra-compact High Velocity Cloud AGC 226067: A Stripped Remnant in the Virgo Cluster. United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/AA7557.
Sand, D. J., Crnojević, D., Seth, A. C., Spekkens, K., Strader, J., Adams, E. A. K., Caldwell, N., Randall, S., Guhathakurta, P., Kenney, J., Simon, J. D., Toloba, E., and Willman, B., E-mail: david.sand@ttu.edu. Mon . "Hubble Space Telescope Imaging of the Ultra-compact High Velocity Cloud AGC 226067: A Stripped Remnant in the Virgo Cluster". United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/AA7557.
@article{osti_22663403,
title = {Hubble Space Telescope Imaging of the Ultra-compact High Velocity Cloud AGC 226067: A Stripped Remnant in the Virgo Cluster},
author = {Sand, D. J. and Crnojević, D. and Seth, A. C. and Spekkens, K. and Strader, J. and Adams, E. A. K. and Caldwell, N. and Randall, S. and Guhathakurta, P. and Kenney, J. and Simon, J. D. and Toloba, E. and Willman, B., E-mail: david.sand@ttu.edu},
abstractNote = {We analyze the optical counterpart to the ultra-compact high velocity cloud AGC 226067, utilizing imaging taken with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) on the Hubble Space Telescope . The color–magnitude diagram of the main body of AGC 226067 reveals an exclusively young stellar population, with an age of ∼7–50 Myr, and is consistent with a metallicity of [Fe/H] ∼ −0.3 as previous work has measured via H ii region spectroscopy. Additionally, the color–magnitude diagram is consistent with a distance of D ≈ 17 Mpc, suggesting an association with the Virgo cluster. A secondary stellar system located ∼1.′6 (∼8 kpc) away in projection has a similar stellar population. The lack of an old red giant branch (≳5 Gyr) is contrasted with a serendipitously discovered Virgo dwarf in the ACS field of view (Dw J122147+132853), and the total diffuse light from AGC 226067 is consistent with the luminosity function of the resolved ∼7–50 Myr stellar population. The main body of AGC 226067 has a M {sub V} = −11.3 ± 0.3, or M {sub stars} = 5.4 ± 1.3 × 10{sup 4} M {sub ⊙} given the stellar population. We searched 20 deg{sup 2} of imaging data adjacent to AGC 226067 in the Virgo Cluster, and found two similar stellar systems dominated by a blue stellar population, far from any massive galaxy counterpart—if this population has star-formation properties that are similar to those of AGC 226067, it implies ∼0.1 M {sub ⊙} yr{sup −1} in Virgo intracluster star formation. Given its unusual stellar population, AGC 226067 is likely a stripped remnant and is plausibly the result of compressed gas from the ram pressure stripped M86 subgroup (∼350 kpc away in projection) as it falls into the Virgo Cluster.},
doi = {10.3847/1538-4357/AA7557},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
number = 2,
volume = 843,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jul 10 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon Jul 10 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}