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Title: How the First Stars Regulated Star Formation. II. Enrichment by Nearby Supernovae

Abstract

Metals from Population III (Pop III) supernovae led to the formation of less massive Pop II stars in the early universe, altering the course of evolution of primeval galaxies and cosmological reionization. There are a variety of scenarios in which heavy elements from the first supernovae were taken up into second-generation stars, but cosmological simulations only model them on the largest scales. We present small-scale, high-resolution simulations of the chemical enrichment of a primordial halo by a nearby supernova after partial evaporation by the progenitor star. We find that ejecta from the explosion crash into and mix violently with ablative flows driven off the halo by the star, creating dense, enriched clumps capable of collapsing into Pop II stars. Metals may mix less efficiently with the partially exposed core of the halo, so it might form either Pop III or Pop II stars. Both Pop II and III stars may thus form after the collision if the ejecta do not strip all the gas from the halo. The partial evaporation of the halo prior to the explosion is crucial to its later enrichment by the supernova.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]; ; ;  [3]
  1. Division of Theoretical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)
  2. Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, Portsmouth University, Portsmouth (United Kingdom)
  3. Zentrum für Astronomie, Institut für Theoretische Astrophysik, Universität Heidelberg (Germany)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22663337
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Astrophysical Journal
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 844; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Journal ID: ISSN 0004-637X
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; COLLISIONS; COSMOLOGY; EVAPORATION; EXPLOSIONS; GALAXIES; METALS; RED SHIFT; RESOLUTION; SIMULATION; STAR EVOLUTION; SUPERNOVAE; UNIVERSE

Citation Formats

Chen, Ke-Jung, Whalen, Daniel J., Wollenberg, Katharina M. J., Glover, Simon C. O., and Klessen, Ralf S., E-mail: ken.chen@nao.ac.jp. How the First Stars Regulated Star Formation. II. Enrichment by Nearby Supernovae. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/AA7B34.
Chen, Ke-Jung, Whalen, Daniel J., Wollenberg, Katharina M. J., Glover, Simon C. O., & Klessen, Ralf S., E-mail: ken.chen@nao.ac.jp. How the First Stars Regulated Star Formation. II. Enrichment by Nearby Supernovae. United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/AA7B34.
Chen, Ke-Jung, Whalen, Daniel J., Wollenberg, Katharina M. J., Glover, Simon C. O., and Klessen, Ralf S., E-mail: ken.chen@nao.ac.jp. Tue . "How the First Stars Regulated Star Formation. II. Enrichment by Nearby Supernovae". United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/AA7B34.
@article{osti_22663337,
title = {How the First Stars Regulated Star Formation. II. Enrichment by Nearby Supernovae},
author = {Chen, Ke-Jung and Whalen, Daniel J. and Wollenberg, Katharina M. J. and Glover, Simon C. O. and Klessen, Ralf S., E-mail: ken.chen@nao.ac.jp},
abstractNote = {Metals from Population III (Pop III) supernovae led to the formation of less massive Pop II stars in the early universe, altering the course of evolution of primeval galaxies and cosmological reionization. There are a variety of scenarios in which heavy elements from the first supernovae were taken up into second-generation stars, but cosmological simulations only model them on the largest scales. We present small-scale, high-resolution simulations of the chemical enrichment of a primordial halo by a nearby supernova after partial evaporation by the progenitor star. We find that ejecta from the explosion crash into and mix violently with ablative flows driven off the halo by the star, creating dense, enriched clumps capable of collapsing into Pop II stars. Metals may mix less efficiently with the partially exposed core of the halo, so it might form either Pop III or Pop II stars. Both Pop II and III stars may thus form after the collision if the ejecta do not strip all the gas from the halo. The partial evaporation of the halo prior to the explosion is crucial to its later enrichment by the supernova.},
doi = {10.3847/1538-4357/AA7B34},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
issn = {0004-637X},
number = 2,
volume = 844,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {8}
}