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Title: Destruction of Refractory Carbon in Protoplanetary Disks

Abstract

The Earth and other rocky bodies in the inner solar system contain significantly less carbon than the primordial materials that seeded their formation. These carbon-poor objects include the parent bodies of primitive meteorites, suggesting that at least one process responsible for solid-phase carbon depletion was active prior to the early stages of planet formation. Potential mechanisms include the erosion of carbonaceous materials by photons or atomic oxygen in the surface layers of the protoplanetary disk. Under photochemically generated favorable conditions, these reactions can deplete the near-surface abundance of carbon grains and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by several orders of magnitude on short timescales relative to the lifetime of the disk out to radii of ∼20–100+ au from the central star depending on the form of refractory carbon present. Due to the reliance of destruction mechanisms on a high influx of photons, the extent of refractory carbon depletion is quite sensitive to the disk’s internal radiation field. Dust transport within the disk is required to affect the composition of the midplane. In our current model of a passive, constant- α disk, where α = 0.01, carbon grains can be turbulently lofted into the destructive surface layers and depleted out to radii ofmore » ∼3–10 au for 0.1–1 μ m grains. Smaller grains can be cleared out of the planet-forming region completely. Destruction may be more effective in an actively accreting disk or when considering individual grain trajectories in non-idealized disks.« less

Authors:
;  [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5]
  1. Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)
  2. Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 1085 S. University, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1107 (United States)
  3. Department of Geophysical Sciences, The University of Chicago, 5734 South Ellis Ave., Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)
  4. European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, D-85748, Garching (Germany)
  5. School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University, 1732, Deogyeong-daero, Giheung-gu, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do 17104 (Korea, Republic of)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22663296
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 845; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; ABUNDANCE; CARBON; COSMIC DUST; EROSION; LAYERS; LIFETIME; METEORITES; OXYGEN; PHOTOCHEMISTRY; PHOTONS; PLANETS; POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS; PROTOPLANETS; REFRACTORIES; SATELLITES; SOLAR SYSTEM; STARS; SURFACES; TRAJECTORIES

Citation Formats

Anderson, Dana E., Blake, Geoffrey A., Bergin, Edwin A., Ciesla, Fred J., Visser, Ruud, and Lee, Jeong-Eun. Destruction of Refractory Carbon in Protoplanetary Disks. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/AA7DA1.
Anderson, Dana E., Blake, Geoffrey A., Bergin, Edwin A., Ciesla, Fred J., Visser, Ruud, & Lee, Jeong-Eun. Destruction of Refractory Carbon in Protoplanetary Disks. United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/AA7DA1.
Anderson, Dana E., Blake, Geoffrey A., Bergin, Edwin A., Ciesla, Fred J., Visser, Ruud, and Lee, Jeong-Eun. Thu . "Destruction of Refractory Carbon in Protoplanetary Disks". United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/AA7DA1.
@article{osti_22663296,
title = {Destruction of Refractory Carbon in Protoplanetary Disks},
author = {Anderson, Dana E. and Blake, Geoffrey A. and Bergin, Edwin A. and Ciesla, Fred J. and Visser, Ruud and Lee, Jeong-Eun},
abstractNote = {The Earth and other rocky bodies in the inner solar system contain significantly less carbon than the primordial materials that seeded their formation. These carbon-poor objects include the parent bodies of primitive meteorites, suggesting that at least one process responsible for solid-phase carbon depletion was active prior to the early stages of planet formation. Potential mechanisms include the erosion of carbonaceous materials by photons or atomic oxygen in the surface layers of the protoplanetary disk. Under photochemically generated favorable conditions, these reactions can deplete the near-surface abundance of carbon grains and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by several orders of magnitude on short timescales relative to the lifetime of the disk out to radii of ∼20–100+ au from the central star depending on the form of refractory carbon present. Due to the reliance of destruction mechanisms on a high influx of photons, the extent of refractory carbon depletion is quite sensitive to the disk’s internal radiation field. Dust transport within the disk is required to affect the composition of the midplane. In our current model of a passive, constant- α disk, where α = 0.01, carbon grains can be turbulently lofted into the destructive surface layers and depleted out to radii of ∼3–10 au for 0.1–1 μ m grains. Smaller grains can be cleared out of the planet-forming region completely. Destruction may be more effective in an actively accreting disk or when considering individual grain trajectories in non-idealized disks.},
doi = {10.3847/1538-4357/AA7DA1},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
number = 1,
volume = 845,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Aug 10 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Thu Aug 10 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}