skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: What Sets the Radial Locations of Warm Debris Disks?

Abstract

The architectures of debris disks encode the history of planet formation in these systems. Studies of debris disks via their spectral energy distributions (SEDs) have found infrared excesses arising from cold dust, warm dust, or a combination of the two. The cold outer belts of many systems have been imaged, facilitating their study in great detail. Far less is known about the warm components, including the origin of the dust. The regularity of the disk temperatures indicates an underlying structure that may be linked to the water snow line. If the dust is generated from collisions in an exo-asteroid belt, the dust will likely trace the location of the water snow line in the primordial protoplanetary disk where planetesimal growth was enhanced. If instead the warm dust arises from the inward transport from a reservoir of icy material farther out in the system, the dust location is expected to be set by the current snow line. We analyze the SEDs of a large sample of debris disks with warm components. We find that warm components in single-component systems (those without detectable cold components) follow the primordial snow line rather than the current snow line, so they likely arise from exo-asteroidmore » belts. While the locations of many warm components in two-component systems are also consistent with the primordial snow line, there is more diversity among these systems, suggesting additional effects play a role.« less

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22663230
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Astrophysical Journal
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 845; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Journal ID: ISSN 0004-637X
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; ASTEROIDS; COLLISIONS; COSMIC DUST; ENERGY SPECTRA; PLANETS; PROTOPLANETS; WATER

Citation Formats

Ballering, Nicholas P., Rieke, George H., Su, Kate Y. L., and Gáspár, András, E-mail: ballerin@email.arizona.edu. What Sets the Radial Locations of Warm Debris Disks?. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/AA8037.
Ballering, Nicholas P., Rieke, George H., Su, Kate Y. L., & Gáspár, András, E-mail: ballerin@email.arizona.edu. What Sets the Radial Locations of Warm Debris Disks?. United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/AA8037.
Ballering, Nicholas P., Rieke, George H., Su, Kate Y. L., and Gáspár, András, E-mail: ballerin@email.arizona.edu. Sun . "What Sets the Radial Locations of Warm Debris Disks?". United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/AA8037.
@article{osti_22663230,
title = {What Sets the Radial Locations of Warm Debris Disks?},
author = {Ballering, Nicholas P. and Rieke, George H. and Su, Kate Y. L. and Gáspár, András, E-mail: ballerin@email.arizona.edu},
abstractNote = {The architectures of debris disks encode the history of planet formation in these systems. Studies of debris disks via their spectral energy distributions (SEDs) have found infrared excesses arising from cold dust, warm dust, or a combination of the two. The cold outer belts of many systems have been imaged, facilitating their study in great detail. Far less is known about the warm components, including the origin of the dust. The regularity of the disk temperatures indicates an underlying structure that may be linked to the water snow line. If the dust is generated from collisions in an exo-asteroid belt, the dust will likely trace the location of the water snow line in the primordial protoplanetary disk where planetesimal growth was enhanced. If instead the warm dust arises from the inward transport from a reservoir of icy material farther out in the system, the dust location is expected to be set by the current snow line. We analyze the SEDs of a large sample of debris disks with warm components. We find that warm components in single-component systems (those without detectable cold components) follow the primordial snow line rather than the current snow line, so they likely arise from exo-asteroid belts. While the locations of many warm components in two-component systems are also consistent with the primordial snow line, there is more diversity among these systems, suggesting additional effects play a role.},
doi = {10.3847/1538-4357/AA8037},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
issn = {0004-637X},
number = 2,
volume = 845,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {8}
}