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Title: Timing Solution and Single-pulse Properties for Eight Rotating Radio Transients

Abstract

Rotating radio transients (RRATs), loosely defined as objects that are discovered through only their single pulses, are sporadic pulsars that have a wide range of emission properties. For many of them, we must measure their periods and determine timing solutions relying on the timing of their individual pulses, while some of the less sporadic RRATs can be timed by using folding techniques as we do for other pulsars. Here, based on Parkes and Green Bank Telescope (GBT) observations, we introduce our results on eight RRATs including their timing-derived rotation parameters, positions, and dispersion measures (DMs), along with a comparison of the spin-down properties of RRATs and normal pulsars. Using data for 24 RRATs, we find that their period derivatives are generally larger than those of normal pulsars, independent of any intrinsic correlation with period, indicating that RRATs’ highly sporadic emission may be associated with intrinsically larger magnetic fields. We carry out Lomb–Scargle tests to search for periodicities in RRATs’ pulse detection times with long timescales. Periodicities are detected for all targets, with significant candidates of roughly 3.4 hr for PSR J1623−0841 and 0.7 hr for PSR J1839−0141. We also analyze their single-pulse amplitude distributions, finding that log-normal distributions provide themore » best fits, as is the case for most pulsars. However, several RRATs exhibit power-law tails, as seen for pulsars emitting giant pulses. This, along with consideration of the selection effects against the detection of weak pulses, imply that RRAT pulses generally represent the tail of a normal intensity distribution.« less

Authors:
;  [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Department of Physics and Astronomy West Virginia University Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)
  2. Department of Physics and Astronomy West Kentucky University Bowling Green, KY 42101 (United States)
  3. Physics and Astronomy Department Texas Tech University Lubbock, TX 79409-1051 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22663123
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 840; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; AMPLITUDES; CORRELATIONS; DETECTION; DISTRIBUTION; EMISSION; GALAXIES; MAGNETIC FIELDS; NEUTRONS; PERIODICITY; PULSARS; PULSES; ROTATION; SIMULATION; SPIN; STARS; TELESCOPES

Citation Formats

Cui, B.-Y., McLaughlin, M. A., Boyles, J., and Palliyaguru, N. Timing Solution and Single-pulse Properties for Eight Rotating Radio Transients. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/AA6AA9.
Cui, B.-Y., McLaughlin, M. A., Boyles, J., & Palliyaguru, N. Timing Solution and Single-pulse Properties for Eight Rotating Radio Transients. United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/AA6AA9.
Cui, B.-Y., McLaughlin, M. A., Boyles, J., and Palliyaguru, N. Mon . "Timing Solution and Single-pulse Properties for Eight Rotating Radio Transients". United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/AA6AA9.
@article{osti_22663123,
title = {Timing Solution and Single-pulse Properties for Eight Rotating Radio Transients},
author = {Cui, B.-Y. and McLaughlin, M. A. and Boyles, J. and Palliyaguru, N.},
abstractNote = {Rotating radio transients (RRATs), loosely defined as objects that are discovered through only their single pulses, are sporadic pulsars that have a wide range of emission properties. For many of them, we must measure their periods and determine timing solutions relying on the timing of their individual pulses, while some of the less sporadic RRATs can be timed by using folding techniques as we do for other pulsars. Here, based on Parkes and Green Bank Telescope (GBT) observations, we introduce our results on eight RRATs including their timing-derived rotation parameters, positions, and dispersion measures (DMs), along with a comparison of the spin-down properties of RRATs and normal pulsars. Using data for 24 RRATs, we find that their period derivatives are generally larger than those of normal pulsars, independent of any intrinsic correlation with period, indicating that RRATs’ highly sporadic emission may be associated with intrinsically larger magnetic fields. We carry out Lomb–Scargle tests to search for periodicities in RRATs’ pulse detection times with long timescales. Periodicities are detected for all targets, with significant candidates of roughly 3.4 hr for PSR J1623−0841 and 0.7 hr for PSR J1839−0141. We also analyze their single-pulse amplitude distributions, finding that log-normal distributions provide the best fits, as is the case for most pulsars. However, several RRATs exhibit power-law tails, as seen for pulsars emitting giant pulses. This, along with consideration of the selection effects against the detection of weak pulses, imply that RRAT pulses generally represent the tail of a normal intensity distribution.},
doi = {10.3847/1538-4357/AA6AA9},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
number = 1,
volume = 840,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
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