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Title: Gamma-Ray Emission of the Kes 73/1E 1841-045 Region Observed with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

Abstract

The supernova remnant (SNR) Kes 73 and/or the magnetar 1E 1841-045 at its center can deposit a large amount of energy to the surroundings and is potentially responsible for particle acceleration. Using the data taken with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT), we confirmed the presence of an extended source whose centroid position is highly consistent with this magnetar/SNR pair. Its emission is intense from 100 MeV to >100 GeV. Its LAT spectrum can be decoupled into two components, which are respectively governed by two different mechanisms. According to the young age of this system, the magnetar is seemingly a necessary and sufficient source for the downward-curved spectrum below 10 GeV, as the observed <10 GeV flux is too high for the SNR to account for. On the other hand, the SNR is reasonably responsible for the hard spectrum above 10 GeV. Further studies of this region in the TeV regime is required so that we can perform physically meaningful comparisons of the >10 GeV spectrum and the TeV spectrum.

Authors:
;  [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5]
  1. Institute of Astronomy and Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China)
  2. Institute of Astronomy and Space Science, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China)
  3. Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)
  4. School of physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)
  5. Department of Physics, University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road (Hong Kong)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22661319
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 837; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; ACCELERATION; COSMIC GAMMA SOURCES; COSMIC RADIATION; EMISSION; GAMMA RADIATION; GEV RANGE; MEV RANGE; NEUTRON STARS; PULSARS; SPECTRA; SUPERNOVA REMNANTS; TELESCOPES; TEV RANGE

Citation Formats

Yeung, Paul K. H., Kong, Albert K. H., Tam, P. H. Thomas, Hui, C. Y., Takata, Jumpei, and Cheng, K. S., E-mail: paul2012@connect.hku.hk, E-mail: akong@phys.nthu.edu.tw, E-mail: tanbxuan@mail.sysu.edu.cn. Gamma-Ray Emission of the Kes 73/1E 1841-045 Region Observed with the Fermi Large Area Telescope. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/AA5DF1.
Yeung, Paul K. H., Kong, Albert K. H., Tam, P. H. Thomas, Hui, C. Y., Takata, Jumpei, & Cheng, K. S., E-mail: paul2012@connect.hku.hk, E-mail: akong@phys.nthu.edu.tw, E-mail: tanbxuan@mail.sysu.edu.cn. Gamma-Ray Emission of the Kes 73/1E 1841-045 Region Observed with the Fermi Large Area Telescope. United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/AA5DF1.
Yeung, Paul K. H., Kong, Albert K. H., Tam, P. H. Thomas, Hui, C. Y., Takata, Jumpei, and Cheng, K. S., E-mail: paul2012@connect.hku.hk, E-mail: akong@phys.nthu.edu.tw, E-mail: tanbxuan@mail.sysu.edu.cn. Wed . "Gamma-Ray Emission of the Kes 73/1E 1841-045 Region Observed with the Fermi Large Area Telescope". United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/AA5DF1.
@article{osti_22661319,
title = {Gamma-Ray Emission of the Kes 73/1E 1841-045 Region Observed with the Fermi Large Area Telescope},
author = {Yeung, Paul K. H. and Kong, Albert K. H. and Tam, P. H. Thomas and Hui, C. Y. and Takata, Jumpei and Cheng, K. S., E-mail: paul2012@connect.hku.hk, E-mail: akong@phys.nthu.edu.tw, E-mail: tanbxuan@mail.sysu.edu.cn},
abstractNote = {The supernova remnant (SNR) Kes 73 and/or the magnetar 1E 1841-045 at its center can deposit a large amount of energy to the surroundings and is potentially responsible for particle acceleration. Using the data taken with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT), we confirmed the presence of an extended source whose centroid position is highly consistent with this magnetar/SNR pair. Its emission is intense from 100 MeV to >100 GeV. Its LAT spectrum can be decoupled into two components, which are respectively governed by two different mechanisms. According to the young age of this system, the magnetar is seemingly a necessary and sufficient source for the downward-curved spectrum below 10 GeV, as the observed <10 GeV flux is too high for the SNR to account for. On the other hand, the SNR is reasonably responsible for the hard spectrum above 10 GeV. Further studies of this region in the TeV regime is required so that we can perform physically meaningful comparisons of the >10 GeV spectrum and the TeV spectrum.},
doi = {10.3847/1538-4357/AA5DF1},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
number = 1,
volume = 837,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}
  • We report the study of the short (32 ms) and first soft {gamma}-ray repeater like burst observed from the anomalous X-ray pulsar (AXP) 1E 1841-045 associated with the supernova remnant Kes 73, discovered on 2010 May 6 by the Burst Alert Telescope on board the Swift {gamma}-ray observatory. The 15-100 keV time-averaged burst spectrum is modeled by a single power law (PL) with a photon index {Gamma} = 3.2{sup +1.8}{sub -1.0} and has a fluence of 1.1{sup +0.4}{sub -0.6} x 10{sup -8} erg cm{sup -2}, a luminosity of 2.9{sup +1.1}{sub -1.6} x 10{sup 39} erg s{sup -1}, and an energymore » of 7.2{sup +0.4}{sub -0.6} x 10{sup 36} erg. The prompt after-burst 0.5-10 keV quiescent spectrum obtained with the Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT) is best fit by an absorbed PL model with {Gamma} = 2.6 {+-} 0.2 and an unabsorbed flux of 9.1{sup +1.2}{sub -1.4} x 10{sup -11} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. To investigate the pre-burst 0.5-10 keV persistent emission, we analyzed the archival XMM-Newton observations, and the spectra are well fitted by a two-component blackbody plus PL model with a temperature kT = 0.45 {+-} 0.03 keV, {Gamma} = 1.9 {+-} 0.2, and an unabsorbed flux of 4.3{sup +0.9}{sub -1.2} x 10{sup -11} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. Comparing the Swift-XRT spectrum with the XMM-Newton spectrum, spectral softening post-burst is evident with a 2.1 times increase in the unabsorbed flux. We discuss the burst activity and the persistent emission properties of AXP 1E 1841-045 in comparison with other magnetars and in the context of the magnetar model.« less
  • Anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) are now established to exhibit significant X-ray variability and be prolific glitchers, with some glitches being accompanied by large radiative changes. An open issue is whether AXP glitches are generically accompanied by radiative changes, relevant for understanding magnetar physical properties. Here we report on an analysis of archival X-ray data from the AXP 1E 1841-045, obtained between 1993 and 2007. This AXP, located in the center of the supernova remnant Kes 73, has exhibited three glitches between 2002 and 2007, as determined by RXTE monitoring since 1999. We have searched for evidence of phase-averaged flux variabilitymore » that could be present if glitches in AXPs are usually accompanied by radiative changes. We find no evidence for glitch-correlated flux changes from this source after 1999, supporting the existence of radiatively silent glitches in AXPs.« less
  • We present a Chandra and XMM-Newton study of the supernova remnant (SNR) Kes 73 hosting the anomalous X-ray pulsar 1E 1841–045. The Chandra image reveals clumpy structures across the remnant with enhanced emission along the western rim. The X-ray emission fills the radio shell and spatially correlates with the infrared image. The global X-ray spectrum is described by a two-component thermal model with a column density N {sub H} = 2.6{sub −0.3}{sup +0.4}×10{sup 22} cm{sup –2} and a total luminosity of L{sub X} = 3.3{sub −0.5}{sup +0.7}×10{sup 37} erg s{sup –1} (0.5-10 keV, at an assumed distance of 8.5 kpc).more » The soft component is characterized by a temperature kT{sub s} = 0.5{sub −0.2}{sup +0.1} keV, a high ionization timescale, and enhanced Si and S abundances, suggesting emission that is dominated by shocked ejecta. The hard component has a temperature kT{sub h} = 1.6{sub −0.7}{sup +0.8} keV, a relatively low ionization timescale, and mostly solar abundances suggesting emission that is dominated by interstellar/circumstellar shocked material. A spatially resolved spectroscopy study reveals no significant variations in the spectral properties. We infer an SNR age ranging between 750 yr and 2100 yr, an explosion energy of 3.0{sub −1.8}{sup +2.8}×10{sup 50} erg and a shock velocity of (1.2 ± 0.3)×10{sup 3} km s{sup –1} (under the Sedov phase assumption). We also discuss the possible scenario for Kes 73 expanding into the late red-supergiant wind phase of its massive progenitor. Comparing the inferred metal abundances to core-collapse nucleosynthesis model yields, we estimate a progenitor mass ≳20 M {sub ☉}, adding a candidate to the growing list of highly magnetized neutron stars proposed to be associated with very massive progenitors.« less
  • We report the discovery of GeV emission at the position of supernova remnant Kes 17 by using the data from the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Kes 17 can be clearly detected with a significance of {approx}12{sigma} in the 1-20 GeV range. Moreover, a number of {gamma}-ray sources were detected in its vicinity. The {gamma}-ray spectrum of Kes 17 can be described well by a simple power law with a photon index of {Gamma} {approx} 2.4. Together with the multiwavelength evidence for its interactions with the nearby molecular cloud, the {gamma}-ray detection suggests that Kesmore » 17 is a candidate acceleration site for cosmic rays.« less
  • The Swift/Burst Alert Telescope detected the first burst from 1E 1841-045 in 2010 May with intermittent burst activity recorded through at least 2011 July. Here we present Swift and Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor observations of this burst activity and search for correlated changes to the persistent X-ray emission of the source. The T {sub 90} durations of the bursts range between 18 and 140 ms, comparable to other magnetar burst durations, while the energy released in each burst ranges between (0.8-25) x 10{sup 38} erg, which is on the low side of soft gamma repeater bursts. We find that the burstingmore » activity did not have a significant effect on the persistent flux level of the source. We argue that the mechanism leading to this sporadic burst activity in 1E 1841-045 might not involve large-scale restructuring (either crustal or magnetospheric) as seen in other magnetar sources.« less