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Title: The ALMA View of the OMC1 Explosion in Orion

Abstract

Most massive stars form in dense clusters where gravitational interactions with other stars may be common. The two nearest forming massive stars, the BN object and Source I, located behind the Orion Nebula, were ejected with velocities of ∼29 and ∼13 km s{sup −1} about 500 years ago by such interactions. This event generated an explosion in the gas. New ALMA observations show in unprecedented detail, a roughly spherically symmetric distribution of over a hundred {sup 12}CO J = 2−1 streamers with velocities extending from V {sub LSR} = −150 to +145 km s{sup −1}. The streamer radial velocities increase (or decrease) linearly with projected distance from the explosion center, forming a “Hubble Flow” confined to within 50″ of the explosion center. They point toward the high proper-motion, shock-excited H{sub 2} and [Fe ii] “fingertips” and lower-velocity CO in the H{sub 2} wakes comprising Orion's “fingers.” In some directions, the H{sub 2} “fingers” extend more than a factor of two farther from the ejection center than the CO streamers. Such deviations from spherical symmetry may be caused by ejecta running into dense gas or the dynamics of the N -body interaction that ejected the stars and produced the explosion. Thismore » ∼10{sup 48} erg event may have been powered by the release of gravitational potential energy associated with the formation of a compact binary or a protostellar merger. Orion may be the prototype for a new class of stellar explosiozn responsible for luminous infrared transients in nearby galaxies.« less

Authors:
;  [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [6]
  1. Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences Department University of Colorado, UCB 389 Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States)
  2. ESO Headquarters Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2 D-85748, Garching bei Munchen (Germany)
  3. Department of Astronomy Steinbach Hall, 52 Hillhouse Avenue, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States)
  4. Steward Observatory University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)
  5. Instituto de Radioastronomía y Astrofísíca, UNAM Apdo. Postal 3-72 (Xangari), 58089 Morelia, Michoacán, México (Mexico)
  6. Deutsches SOFIA Institut (DSI) University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 29, D-70569 (Germany)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22661317
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 837; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; BORON NITRIDES; CARBON; CARBON 12; CARBON MONOXIDE; DISTRIBUTION; EXPLOSIONS; GALAXIES; GRAVITATIONAL INTERACTIONS; HYDROGEN; NEBULAE; PROPER MOTION; RADIAL VELOCITY; STARS; SYMMETRY; TRANSIENTS

Citation Formats

Bally, John, Youngblood, Allison, Ginsburg, Adam, Arce, Hector, Eisner, Josh, Zapata, Luis, and Zinnecker, Hans, E-mail: john.bally@colorado.edu. The ALMA View of the OMC1 Explosion in Orion. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/AA5C8B.
Bally, John, Youngblood, Allison, Ginsburg, Adam, Arce, Hector, Eisner, Josh, Zapata, Luis, & Zinnecker, Hans, E-mail: john.bally@colorado.edu. The ALMA View of the OMC1 Explosion in Orion. United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/AA5C8B.
Bally, John, Youngblood, Allison, Ginsburg, Adam, Arce, Hector, Eisner, Josh, Zapata, Luis, and Zinnecker, Hans, E-mail: john.bally@colorado.edu. Wed . "The ALMA View of the OMC1 Explosion in Orion". United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/AA5C8B.
@article{osti_22661317,
title = {The ALMA View of the OMC1 Explosion in Orion},
author = {Bally, John and Youngblood, Allison and Ginsburg, Adam and Arce, Hector and Eisner, Josh and Zapata, Luis and Zinnecker, Hans, E-mail: john.bally@colorado.edu},
abstractNote = {Most massive stars form in dense clusters where gravitational interactions with other stars may be common. The two nearest forming massive stars, the BN object and Source I, located behind the Orion Nebula, were ejected with velocities of ∼29 and ∼13 km s{sup −1} about 500 years ago by such interactions. This event generated an explosion in the gas. New ALMA observations show in unprecedented detail, a roughly spherically symmetric distribution of over a hundred {sup 12}CO J = 2−1 streamers with velocities extending from V {sub LSR} = −150 to +145 km s{sup −1}. The streamer radial velocities increase (or decrease) linearly with projected distance from the explosion center, forming a “Hubble Flow” confined to within 50″ of the explosion center. They point toward the high proper-motion, shock-excited H{sub 2} and [Fe ii] “fingertips” and lower-velocity CO in the H{sub 2} wakes comprising Orion's “fingers.” In some directions, the H{sub 2} “fingers” extend more than a factor of two farther from the ejection center than the CO streamers. Such deviations from spherical symmetry may be caused by ejecta running into dense gas or the dynamics of the N -body interaction that ejected the stars and produced the explosion. This ∼10{sup 48} erg event may have been powered by the release of gravitational potential energy associated with the formation of a compact binary or a protostellar merger. Orion may be the prototype for a new class of stellar explosiozn responsible for luminous infrared transients in nearby galaxies.},
doi = {10.3847/1538-4357/AA5C8B},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
number = 1,
volume = 837,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}