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Title: The ALMA View of the OMC1 Explosion in Orion

Abstract

Most massive stars form in dense clusters where gravitational interactions with other stars may be common. The two nearest forming massive stars, the BN object and Source I, located behind the Orion Nebula, were ejected with velocities of ∼29 and ∼13 km s{sup −1} about 500 years ago by such interactions. This event generated an explosion in the gas. New ALMA observations show in unprecedented detail, a roughly spherically symmetric distribution of over a hundred {sup 12}CO J = 2−1 streamers with velocities extending from V {sub LSR} = −150 to +145 km s{sup −1}. The streamer radial velocities increase (or decrease) linearly with projected distance from the explosion center, forming a “Hubble Flow” confined to within 50″ of the explosion center. They point toward the high proper-motion, shock-excited H{sub 2} and [Fe ii] “fingertips” and lower-velocity CO in the H{sub 2} wakes comprising Orion's “fingers.” In some directions, the H{sub 2} “fingers” extend more than a factor of two farther from the ejection center than the CO streamers. Such deviations from spherical symmetry may be caused by ejecta running into dense gas or the dynamics of the N -body interaction that ejected the stars and produced the explosion. Thismore » ∼10{sup 48} erg event may have been powered by the release of gravitational potential energy associated with the formation of a compact binary or a protostellar merger. Orion may be the prototype for a new class of stellar explosiozn responsible for luminous infrared transients in nearby galaxies.« less

Authors:
;  [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [6]
  1. Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences Department University of Colorado, UCB 389 Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States)
  2. ESO Headquarters Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2 D-85748, Garching bei Munchen (Germany)
  3. Department of Astronomy Steinbach Hall, 52 Hillhouse Avenue, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States)
  4. Steward Observatory University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)
  5. Instituto de Radioastronomía y Astrofísíca, UNAM Apdo. Postal 3-72 (Xangari), 58089 Morelia, Michoacán, México (Mexico)
  6. Deutsches SOFIA Institut (DSI) University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 29, D-70569 (Germany)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22661317
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 837; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; BORON NITRIDES; CARBON; CARBON 12; CARBON MONOXIDE; DISTRIBUTION; EXPLOSIONS; GALAXIES; GRAVITATIONAL INTERACTIONS; HYDROGEN; NEBULAE; PROPER MOTION; RADIAL VELOCITY; STARS; SYMMETRY; TRANSIENTS

Citation Formats

Bally, John, Youngblood, Allison, Ginsburg, Adam, Arce, Hector, Eisner, Josh, Zapata, Luis, and Zinnecker, Hans, E-mail: john.bally@colorado.edu. The ALMA View of the OMC1 Explosion in Orion. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/AA5C8B.
Bally, John, Youngblood, Allison, Ginsburg, Adam, Arce, Hector, Eisner, Josh, Zapata, Luis, & Zinnecker, Hans, E-mail: john.bally@colorado.edu. The ALMA View of the OMC1 Explosion in Orion. United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/AA5C8B.
Bally, John, Youngblood, Allison, Ginsburg, Adam, Arce, Hector, Eisner, Josh, Zapata, Luis, and Zinnecker, Hans, E-mail: john.bally@colorado.edu. Wed . "The ALMA View of the OMC1 Explosion in Orion". United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/AA5C8B.
@article{osti_22661317,
title = {The ALMA View of the OMC1 Explosion in Orion},
author = {Bally, John and Youngblood, Allison and Ginsburg, Adam and Arce, Hector and Eisner, Josh and Zapata, Luis and Zinnecker, Hans, E-mail: john.bally@colorado.edu},
abstractNote = {Most massive stars form in dense clusters where gravitational interactions with other stars may be common. The two nearest forming massive stars, the BN object and Source I, located behind the Orion Nebula, were ejected with velocities of ∼29 and ∼13 km s{sup −1} about 500 years ago by such interactions. This event generated an explosion in the gas. New ALMA observations show in unprecedented detail, a roughly spherically symmetric distribution of over a hundred {sup 12}CO J = 2−1 streamers with velocities extending from V {sub LSR} = −150 to +145 km s{sup −1}. The streamer radial velocities increase (or decrease) linearly with projected distance from the explosion center, forming a “Hubble Flow” confined to within 50″ of the explosion center. They point toward the high proper-motion, shock-excited H{sub 2} and [Fe ii] “fingertips” and lower-velocity CO in the H{sub 2} wakes comprising Orion's “fingers.” In some directions, the H{sub 2} “fingers” extend more than a factor of two farther from the ejection center than the CO streamers. Such deviations from spherical symmetry may be caused by ejecta running into dense gas or the dynamics of the N -body interaction that ejected the stars and produced the explosion. This ∼10{sup 48} erg event may have been powered by the release of gravitational potential energy associated with the formation of a compact binary or a protostellar merger. Orion may be the prototype for a new class of stellar explosiozn responsible for luminous infrared transients in nearby galaxies.},
doi = {10.3847/1538-4357/AA5C8B},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
number = 1,
volume = 837,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}
  • In this Letter, we present sensitive millimeter SiO (J = 5-4; {nu} = 0) line observations of the outflow arising from the enigmatic object Orion Source I made with the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA). The observations reveal that at scales of a few thousand AU, the outflow has a marked 'butterfly' morphology along a northeast-southwest axis. However, contrary to what is found in the SiO and H{sub 2}O maser observations at scales of tens of AU, the blueshifted radial velocities of the moving gas are found to the northwest, while the redshifted velocities are in the southeast. The ALMAmore » observations are complemented with SiO (J = 8-7; {nu} = 0) maps (with a similar spatial resolution) obtained with the Submillimeter Array. These observations also show a similar morphology and velocity structure in this outflow. We discuss some possibilities to explain these differences at small and large scales across the flow.« less
  • We investigated the ALMA science verification data of Orion KL and found a spectral signature of the vibrationally excited H{sub 2}O maser line at 232.68670 GHz ({nu}{sub 2} = 1, 5{sub 5,0}-6{sub 4,3}). This line has been detected previously in circumstellar envelopes of late-type stars but not in young stellar objects such as Orion KL. Thus, this is the first detection of the 232 GHz vibrationally excited H{sub 2}O maser in star-forming regions. The distribution of the 232 GHz maser is concentrated at the position of the radio Source I, which is remarkably different from other molecular lines. The spectrummore » shows a double-peak structure at the peak velocities of -2.1 and 13.3 km s{sup -1}. It appears to be consistent with the 22 GHz H{sub 2}O masers and 43 GHz SiO masers observed around Source I. Thus, the 232 GHz H{sub 2}O maser around Source I would be excited by the internal heating by an embedded protostar, being associated with either the root of the outflows/jets or the circumstellar disk around Source I, as traced by the 22 GHz H{sub 2}O masers or 43 GHz SiO masers, respectively.« less
  • We present Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations of protoplanetary disks ('proplyds') in the Orion Nebula Cluster. We imaged five individual fields at 856 μm containing 22 Hubble Space Telescope (HST)-identified proplyds and detected 21 of them. Eight of those disks were detected for the first time at submillimeter wavelengths, including the most prominent, well-known proplyd in the entire Orion Nebula, 114-426. Thermal dust emission in excess of any free-free component was measured in all but one of the detected disks, and ranged between 1 and 163 mJy, with resulting disk masses of 0.3-79 M {sub jup}. An additional 26more » stars with no prior evidence of associated disks in HST observations were also imaged within the 5 fields, but only 2 were detected. The disk mass upper limits for the undetected targets, which include OB stars, θ{sup 1} Ori C, and θ{sup 1} Ori F, range from 0.1 to 0.6 M {sub jup}. Combining these ALMA data with previous Submillimeter Array observations, we find a lack of massive (≳3 M {sub jup}) disks in the extreme-UV-dominated region of Orion, within 0.03 pc of θ{sup 1} Ori C. At larger separations from θ{sup 1} Ori C, in the far-UV-dominated region, there is a wide range of disk masses, similar to what is found in low-mass star forming regions. Taken together, these results suggest that a rapid dissipation of disk masses likely inhibits potential planet formation in the extreme-UV-dominated regions of OB associations, but leaves disks in the far-UV-dominated regions relatively unaffected.« less
  • This work reports high spatial resolution observations toward the Orion KL region with high critical density lines of CH{sub 3}CN (12{sub 4}-11{sub 4}) and CH{sub 3}OH (8{sub –1,8}-7{sub 0,7}), as well as a continuum at ∼1.3 mm band. The observations were made using the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array with a spatial resolution of ∼1.''5 and sensitivity of about 0.07 K and ∼0.18 K for continuum and line, respectively. The observational results showed that the gas in the Orion KL region consists of jet-propelled cores at the ridge and dense cores east and south of the region that are shaped likemore » a wedge ring. The outflow has multiple lobes, which may originate from an explosive ejection, and is not driven by young stellar objects. Four infrared bubbles were found in the Spitzer/IRAC emissions. These bubbles, the distributions of the previously found H{sub 2} jets, the young stellar objects, and molecular gas suggest that BN is the explosive center. The burst time was estimated to be ≤1300 yr. At the same time, signatures of gravitational collapse toward Source I and the hot core were detected with material infall velocities of 1.5 km s{sup –1} and ∼0.6 km s{sup –1}, corresponding to mass accretion rates of 1.2 × 10{sup –3} M {sub ☉}/yr and 8.0 × 10{sup –5} M {sub ☉}/yr, respectively. These observations may support the belief that high-mass stars form via the accretion model, similar to their low-mass counterparts.« less
  • We present Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations of a wide binary system in Orion, with projected separation 440 AU, in which we detect submillimeter emission from the protoplanetary disks around each star. Both disks appear moderately massive and have strong line emission in CO 3-2, HCO{sup +} 4-3, and HCN 3-2. In addition, CS 7-6 is detected in one disk. The line-to-continuum ratios are similar for the two disks in each of the lines. From the resolved velocity gradients across each disk, we constrain the masses of the central stars, and show consistency with optical-infrared spectroscopy, both indicative ofmore » a high mass ratio ∼9. The small difference between the systemic velocities indicates that the binary orbital plane is close to face-on. The angle between the projected disk rotation axes is very high, ∼72°, showing that the system did not form from a single massive disk or a rigidly rotating cloud core. This finding, which adds to related evidence from disk geometries in other systems, protostellar outflows, stellar rotation, and similar recent ALMA results, demonstrates that turbulence or dynamical interactions act on small scales well below that of molecular cores during the early stages of star formation.« less