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Title: Nature of the Diffuse Source and Its Central Point-like Source in SNR 0509–67.5

Abstract

We examine a diffuse emission region near the center of SNR 0509−67.5 to determine its nature. Within this diffuse region we observe a point-like source that is bright in the near-IR, but is not visible in the B and V bands. We consider an emission line observed at 6766 Å and the possibilities that it is Ly α , H α , and [O ii] λ 3727. We examine the spectral energy distribution (SED) of the source, comprised of Hubble Space Telescope B , V , I , J , and H bands in addition to Spitzer /IRAC 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8 μ m bands. The peak of the SED is consistent with a background galaxy at z ≈ 0.8 ± 0.2 and a possible Balmer jump places the galaxy at z ≈ 0.9 ± 0.3. These SED considerations support the emission line’s identification as [O ii] λ 3727. We conclude that the diffuse source in SNR 0509−67.5 is a background galaxy at z ≈ 0.82. Furthermore, we identify the point-like source superposed near the center of the galaxy as its central bulge. Finally, we find no evidence for a surviving companion star, indicating a double-degenerate origin for SNRmore » 0509−67.5.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;  [1];  [2];  [3];  [4]
  1. Astronomy Department, University of Illinois, 1002 W. Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)
  2. Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan, R.O.C. (China)
  3. Departement Physik, Universität Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland)
  4. Department of Astronomy, University of California, 501 Cambell Hall #3411, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22661302
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 837; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; EMISSION; ENERGY SPECTRA; LYMAN LINES; MAGELLANIC CLOUDS; SPACE; STARS; SUPERNOVA REMNANTS; TELESCOPES

Citation Formats

Litke, Katrina C., Chu, You-Hua, Holmes, Abigail, Santucci, Robert, Blindauer, Terrence, Gruendl, Robert A., Ricker, Paul M., Li, Chuan-Jui, Pan, Kuo-Chuan, and Weisz, Daniel R., E-mail: kclitke@email.arizona.edu. Nature of the Diffuse Source and Its Central Point-like Source in SNR 0509–67.5. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/AA5D57.
Litke, Katrina C., Chu, You-Hua, Holmes, Abigail, Santucci, Robert, Blindauer, Terrence, Gruendl, Robert A., Ricker, Paul M., Li, Chuan-Jui, Pan, Kuo-Chuan, & Weisz, Daniel R., E-mail: kclitke@email.arizona.edu. Nature of the Diffuse Source and Its Central Point-like Source in SNR 0509–67.5. United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/AA5D57.
Litke, Katrina C., Chu, You-Hua, Holmes, Abigail, Santucci, Robert, Blindauer, Terrence, Gruendl, Robert A., Ricker, Paul M., Li, Chuan-Jui, Pan, Kuo-Chuan, and Weisz, Daniel R., E-mail: kclitke@email.arizona.edu. Fri . "Nature of the Diffuse Source and Its Central Point-like Source in SNR 0509–67.5". United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/AA5D57.
@article{osti_22661302,
title = {Nature of the Diffuse Source and Its Central Point-like Source in SNR 0509–67.5},
author = {Litke, Katrina C. and Chu, You-Hua and Holmes, Abigail and Santucci, Robert and Blindauer, Terrence and Gruendl, Robert A. and Ricker, Paul M. and Li, Chuan-Jui and Pan, Kuo-Chuan and Weisz, Daniel R., E-mail: kclitke@email.arizona.edu},
abstractNote = {We examine a diffuse emission region near the center of SNR 0509−67.5 to determine its nature. Within this diffuse region we observe a point-like source that is bright in the near-IR, but is not visible in the B and V bands. We consider an emission line observed at 6766 Å and the possibilities that it is Ly α , H α , and [O ii] λ 3727. We examine the spectral energy distribution (SED) of the source, comprised of Hubble Space Telescope B , V , I , J , and H bands in addition to Spitzer /IRAC 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8 μ m bands. The peak of the SED is consistent with a background galaxy at z ≈ 0.8 ± 0.2 and a possible Balmer jump places the galaxy at z ≈ 0.9 ± 0.3. These SED considerations support the emission line’s identification as [O ii] λ 3727. We conclude that the diffuse source in SNR 0509−67.5 is a background galaxy at z ≈ 0.82. Furthermore, we identify the point-like source superposed near the center of the galaxy as its central bulge. Finally, we find no evidence for a surviving companion star, indicating a double-degenerate origin for SNR 0509−67.5.},
doi = {10.3847/1538-4357/AA5D57},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
number = 2,
volume = 837,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Mar 10 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Fri Mar 10 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}
  • Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are well-known for their use in the measurement of cosmological distances, but our continuing lack of concrete knowledge about their progenitor stars is both a matter of debate and a source of systematic error. In our attempts to answer this question, we presented unambiguous evidence that LMC SNR 0509–67.5, the remnant of an SN Ia that exploded in the Large Magellanic Cloud 400 ± 50 yr ago, did not have any point sources (stars) near the site of the original supernova explosion, from which we concluded that this particular supernova must have had a progenitormore » system consisting of two white dwarfs. There is, however, evidence of nebulosity near the center of the remnant, which could have been left over detritus from the less massive WD, or could have been a background galaxy unrelated to the supernova explosion. We obtained long-slit spectra of the central nebulous region using GMOS on Gemini South to determine which of these two possibilities is correct. The spectra show Hα emission at a redshift of z = 0.031, which implies that the nebulosity in the center of LMC SNR 0509–67.5 is a background galaxy, unrelated to the supernova.« less
  • The 6.67 hr periodicity and the variable X-ray flux of the central compact object (CCO) at the center of the supernova remnant RCW 103, named 1E 161348–5055, have been always difficult to interpret within the standard scenarios of an isolated neutron star (NS) or a binary system. On 2016 June 22, the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) on board Swift detected a magnetar-like short X-ray burst from the direction of 1E 161348–5055, also coincident with a large long-term X-ray outburst. Here, we report on Chandra , Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array , and Swift (BAT and XRT) observations of this peculiar sourcemore » during its 2016 outburst peak. In particular, we study the properties of this magnetar-like burst, we discover a hard X-ray tail in the CCO spectrum during outburst, and we study its long-term outburst history (from 1999 to 2016 July). We find the emission properties of 1E 161348–5055 consistent with it being a magnetar. However, in this scenario, the 6.67 hr periodicity can only be interpreted as the rotation period of this strongly magnetized NS, which therefore represents the slowest pulsar ever detected, by orders of magnitude. We briefly discuss the viable slow-down scenarios, favoring a picture involving a period of fall-back accretion after the supernova explosion, similarly to what is invoked (although in a different regime) to explain the “anti-magnetar” scenario for other CCOs.« less
  • We present new results of the HESS J1731-347/SNR G353.6-0.7 system from XMM-Newton and Suzaku X-ray observations and Delinha CO observations. We discover extended hard X-rays coincident with the bright, extended TeV source HESS J1731-347 and the shell of the radio supernova remnant (SNR). We find that spatially resolved X-ray spectra can generally be characterized by an absorbed power-law model, with a photon index of {approx}2, typical of non-thermal emission. A bright X-ray compact source, XMMS J173203-344518, is also detected near the center of the SNR. We find no evidence of a radio counterpart or an extended X-ray morphology for thismore » source, making it unlikely to be a pulsar wind nebular (PWN). The spectrum of the source can be well fitted by an absorbed blackbody with a temperature of {approx}0.5 keV plus a power-law tail with a photon index of {approx}5, reminiscent of the X-ray emission of a magnetar. CO observations toward the inner part of the High Energy Stereoscopic System (HESS) source reveal a bright cloud component at -20 +- 4 km s{sup -1}, which is likely located at the same distance of {approx}3.2 kpc as the SNR. Based on the probable association between the X-ray and gamma-ray emissions and likely association between the CO cloud and the SNR, we argue that the extended TeV emission originates from the interaction between the SNR shock and the adjacent CO clouds rather than from a PWN.« less