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Title: Evolution of Supernova Remnants Near the Galactic Center

Abstract

Supernovae near the Galactic center (GC) evolve differently from regular Galactic supernovae. This is mainly due to the environment into which the supernova remnants (SNRs) propagate. SNRs near the GC propagate into a wind swept environment with a velocity directed away from the GC, and a graded density profile. This causes these SNRs to be non-spherical, and to evolve faster than their Galactic counterparts. We develop an analytic theory for the evolution of explosions within a stellar wind, and verify it using a hydrodynamic code. We show that such explosions can evolve in one of three possible morphologies. Using these results we discuss the association between the two SNRs (SGR East and SGR A’s bipolar radio/X-ray lobes) and the two neutron stars (the Cannonball and SGR J1745-2900) near the GC. We show that, given the morphologies of the SNR and positions of the neutron stars, the only possible association is between SGR A’s bipolar radio/X-ray lobes and SGR J1745-2900. If a compact object was created in the explosion of SGR East, it remains undetected, and the SNR of the supernova that created the Cannonball has already disappeared.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. Racah Institute of Physics, the Hebrew University, 91904, Jerusalem (Israel)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22661265
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 838; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; BLACK HOLES; DENSITY; EXPLOSIONS; GALAXIES; GALAXY NUCLEI; HYDRODYNAMICS; NEUTRON STARS; QUASARS; STELLAR WINDS; SUPERNOVA REMNANTS; SUPERNOVAE; VELOCITY; X RADIATION

Citation Formats

Yalinewich, A., Piran, T., and Sari, R.. Evolution of Supernova Remnants Near the Galactic Center. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/AA5D0F.
Yalinewich, A., Piran, T., & Sari, R.. Evolution of Supernova Remnants Near the Galactic Center. United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/AA5D0F.
Yalinewich, A., Piran, T., and Sari, R.. Mon . "Evolution of Supernova Remnants Near the Galactic Center". United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/AA5D0F.
@article{osti_22661265,
title = {Evolution of Supernova Remnants Near the Galactic Center},
author = {Yalinewich, A. and Piran, T. and Sari, R.},
abstractNote = {Supernovae near the Galactic center (GC) evolve differently from regular Galactic supernovae. This is mainly due to the environment into which the supernova remnants (SNRs) propagate. SNRs near the GC propagate into a wind swept environment with a velocity directed away from the GC, and a graded density profile. This causes these SNRs to be non-spherical, and to evolve faster than their Galactic counterparts. We develop an analytic theory for the evolution of explosions within a stellar wind, and verify it using a hydrodynamic code. We show that such explosions can evolve in one of three possible morphologies. Using these results we discuss the association between the two SNRs (SGR East and SGR A’s bipolar radio/X-ray lobes) and the two neutron stars (the Cannonball and SGR J1745-2900) near the GC. We show that, given the morphologies of the SNR and positions of the neutron stars, the only possible association is between SGR A’s bipolar radio/X-ray lobes and SGR J1745-2900. If a compact object was created in the explosion of SGR East, it remains undetected, and the SNR of the supernova that created the Cannonball has already disappeared.},
doi = {10.3847/1538-4357/AA5D0F},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
number = 1,
volume = 838,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Mar 20 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon Mar 20 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
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