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Title: A History of H i Stripping in Virgo: A Phase-space View of VIVA Galaxies

Abstract

We investigate the orbital histories of Virgo galaxies at various stages of H i gas stripping. In particular, we compare the location of galaxies with different H i morphology in phase space. This method is a great tool for tracing the gas stripping histories of galaxies as they fall into the cluster. Most galaxies at the early stage of H i stripping are found in the first infall region of Virgo, while galaxies undergoing active H i stripping mostly appear to be falling in or moving out near the cluster core for the first time. Galaxies with severely stripped, yet symmetric, H i disks are found in one of two locations. Some are deep inside the cluster, but others are found in the cluster outskirts with low orbital velocities. We suggest that the latter group of galaxies belong to a “backsplash” population. These present the clearest candidates for backsplashed galaxies observationally identified to date. We further investigate the distribution of a large sample of H i-detected galaxies toward Virgo in phase space, confirming that most galaxies are stripped of their gas as they settle into the gravitational potential of the cluster. In addition, we discuss the impact of tidal interactionsmore » between galaxies and group preprocessing on the H i properties of the cluster galaxies, and link the associated star formation evolution to the stripping sequence of cluster galaxies.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. Department of Astronomy, Yonsei University, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 03722 (Korea, Republic of)
  2. European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Córdova 3107, Vitacura, Casilla 19001, Santiago (Chile)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22661219
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 838; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; DISTRIBUTION; EVOLUTION; GALAXIES; GALAXY CLUSTERS; INTERACTIONS; PHASE SPACE; STARS; STRIPPING; SYMMETRY; VELOCITY

Citation Formats

Yoon, Hyein, Chung, Aeree, Smith, Rory, and Jaffé, Yara L., E-mail: hiyoon@galaxy.yonsei.ac.kr, E-mail: achung@yonsei.ac.kr. A History of H i Stripping in Virgo: A Phase-space View of VIVA Galaxies. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/AA6579.
Yoon, Hyein, Chung, Aeree, Smith, Rory, & Jaffé, Yara L., E-mail: hiyoon@galaxy.yonsei.ac.kr, E-mail: achung@yonsei.ac.kr. A History of H i Stripping in Virgo: A Phase-space View of VIVA Galaxies. United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/AA6579.
Yoon, Hyein, Chung, Aeree, Smith, Rory, and Jaffé, Yara L., E-mail: hiyoon@galaxy.yonsei.ac.kr, E-mail: achung@yonsei.ac.kr. Sat . "A History of H i Stripping in Virgo: A Phase-space View of VIVA Galaxies". United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/AA6579.
@article{osti_22661219,
title = {A History of H i Stripping in Virgo: A Phase-space View of VIVA Galaxies},
author = {Yoon, Hyein and Chung, Aeree and Smith, Rory and Jaffé, Yara L., E-mail: hiyoon@galaxy.yonsei.ac.kr, E-mail: achung@yonsei.ac.kr},
abstractNote = {We investigate the orbital histories of Virgo galaxies at various stages of H i gas stripping. In particular, we compare the location of galaxies with different H i morphology in phase space. This method is a great tool for tracing the gas stripping histories of galaxies as they fall into the cluster. Most galaxies at the early stage of H i stripping are found in the first infall region of Virgo, while galaxies undergoing active H i stripping mostly appear to be falling in or moving out near the cluster core for the first time. Galaxies with severely stripped, yet symmetric, H i disks are found in one of two locations. Some are deep inside the cluster, but others are found in the cluster outskirts with low orbital velocities. We suggest that the latter group of galaxies belong to a “backsplash” population. These present the clearest candidates for backsplashed galaxies observationally identified to date. We further investigate the distribution of a large sample of H i-detected galaxies toward Virgo in phase space, confirming that most galaxies are stripped of their gas as they settle into the gravitational potential of the cluster. In addition, we discuss the impact of tidal interactions between galaxies and group preprocessing on the H i properties of the cluster galaxies, and link the associated star formation evolution to the stripping sequence of cluster galaxies.},
doi = {10.3847/1538-4357/AA6579},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
number = 2,
volume = 838,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Sat Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
  • Correlations between various properties of blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxies in the Virgo Cluster were studied. It was found that, at constant mass, BCD galaxies are comparable to non-BCD irregulars in both blue luminosity and H I flux. About one-third of the BCDs were detected by IRAS at 60 or 100 microns, mostly at intensities just above the threshold sensitivity. 97 refs.
  • The low abundance of interstellar gas and the retarded pace of star formation observed in some Virgo cluster galaxies can be explained by a stripping of gas from the outer parts of member galaxies due to the pressure of intergalactic gas on their gas layers, and by the enhanced depletion of gas due to star formation.
  • There is sufficient observational evidence to show that many Virgo Cluster spirals are H I deficient in their inner disks (in addition to being H I deficient globally, as previously established). It is shown here that collisions between galaxies in a cluster can lead to the removal of H I gas from these galaxies while leaving the H2 gas, undisturbed. This follows directly from the application of the Spitzer-Baade collisional gas removal mechanism to galaxies consisting of stars and a two-component ISM consisting of H I and H2, with H I having the largest filling factor. This can account formore » both the observed H I deficiency in the inner regions and the normal H2 content of these galaxies. The frequency of galaxy collisions in the Virgo Cluster is shown to be large enough to make collisional gas removal a viable mechanism. 46 refs.« less
  • As a test of procedures required to study the H I contents of spiral galaxies in distant clusters of galaxies, the cluster Abell 154 has been observed from Arecibo. Fourteen candidate detections were found in two regions of the cluster comprising about 10 percent of the cluster area. These results are compared in detail with those expected for the exhaustively studied Virgo cluster displaced to the distance of A 154. Most of the candidate detections are likely to be the combined profiles of two or more spiral galaxies, many of them too faint to appear on the list of morphologicalmore » types classified by Dressler (1980). Any attempt to identify these H I signals with known bright spirals is problematic at best. The A 154 profiles are systematically broader than expected for Virgo, but a crude application of the Tully-Fisher correlation indicates that they are still consistent with available photometric data. While the H I deficiency in Virgo would still be apparent at the A 154 distance, no significant evidence is found for H I deficiency in A 154. 46 refs.« less
  • A neutral hydrogen survey was carried out at Arecibo on 91 dwarf irregular galaxies, with morphological types Sdm through Im, in and around the direction of the Virgo Cluster. Only nine of these were found to be background galaxies, and 19 remain undetected, i.e., most of the candidate galaxies are indeed members of the Virgo Cluster or Supercluster. The distribution of positions and systemic velocities (compared with large spirals) shows no evidence for mass segregation. The H I depletion for dwarfs in the cluster core is only moderate, no more than for spirals. The magnitude-velocity width correlation is continuous frommore » spirals to dwarfs. Statistics on H I masses agree only partially with a simple stochastic star formation model.« less