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Title: Star Formation In Nearby Clouds (SFiNCs): X-Ray and Infrared Source Catalogs and Membership

Abstract

The Star Formation in Nearby Clouds (SFiNCs) project is aimed at providing a detailed study of the young stellar populations and of star cluster formation in the nearby 22 star-forming regions (SFRs) for comparison with our earlier MYStIX survey of richer, more distant clusters. As a foundation for the SFiNCs science studies, here, homogeneous data analyses of the Chandra X-ray and Spitzer mid-infrared archival SFiNCs data are described, and the resulting catalogs of over 15,300 X-ray and over 1,630,000 mid-infrared point sources are presented. On the basis of their X-ray/infrared properties and spatial distributions, nearly 8500 point sources have been identified as probable young stellar members of the SFiNCs regions. Compared to the existing X-ray/mid-infrared publications, the SFiNCs member list increases the census of YSO members by 6%–200% for individual SFRs and by 40% for the merged sample of all 22 SFiNCs SFRs.

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5]
  1. Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Laboratory, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)
  2. Instituto de Fisica y Astronomia, Universidad de Valparaiso, Gran Bretana 1111, Playa Ancha, Valparaiso (Chile)
  3. (Chile)
  4. Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Exeter, Stocker Road, Exeter, Devon EX4 4SB (United Kingdom)
  5. Huntingdon Institute for X-Ray Astronomy, LLC, 10677 Franks Road, Huntingdon, PA 16652 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22661211
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal, Supplement Series; Journal Volume: 229; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; CATALOGS; CLOUDS; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; DATA ANALYSIS; INTERMEDIATE INFRARED RADIATION; POINT SOURCES; SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION; STAR CLUSTERS; STAR EVOLUTION; STARS; X RADIATION

Citation Formats

Getman, Konstantin V., Broos, Patrick S., Feigelson, Eric D., Richert, Alexander J. W., Ota, Yosuke, Kuhn, Michael A., Millennium Institute of Astrophysics, MAS, Bate, Matthew R., and Garmire, Gordon P.. Star Formation In Nearby Clouds (SFiNCs): X-Ray and Infrared Source Catalogs and Membership. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.3847/1538-4365/229/2/28.
Getman, Konstantin V., Broos, Patrick S., Feigelson, Eric D., Richert, Alexander J. W., Ota, Yosuke, Kuhn, Michael A., Millennium Institute of Astrophysics, MAS, Bate, Matthew R., & Garmire, Gordon P.. Star Formation In Nearby Clouds (SFiNCs): X-Ray and Infrared Source Catalogs and Membership. United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4365/229/2/28.
Getman, Konstantin V., Broos, Patrick S., Feigelson, Eric D., Richert, Alexander J. W., Ota, Yosuke, Kuhn, Michael A., Millennium Institute of Astrophysics, MAS, Bate, Matthew R., and Garmire, Gordon P.. Sat . "Star Formation In Nearby Clouds (SFiNCs): X-Ray and Infrared Source Catalogs and Membership". United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4365/229/2/28.
@article{osti_22661211,
title = {Star Formation In Nearby Clouds (SFiNCs): X-Ray and Infrared Source Catalogs and Membership},
author = {Getman, Konstantin V. and Broos, Patrick S. and Feigelson, Eric D. and Richert, Alexander J. W. and Ota, Yosuke and Kuhn, Michael A. and Millennium Institute of Astrophysics, MAS and Bate, Matthew R. and Garmire, Gordon P.},
abstractNote = {The Star Formation in Nearby Clouds (SFiNCs) project is aimed at providing a detailed study of the young stellar populations and of star cluster formation in the nearby 22 star-forming regions (SFRs) for comparison with our earlier MYStIX survey of richer, more distant clusters. As a foundation for the SFiNCs science studies, here, homogeneous data analyses of the Chandra X-ray and Spitzer mid-infrared archival SFiNCs data are described, and the resulting catalogs of over 15,300 X-ray and over 1,630,000 mid-infrared point sources are presented. On the basis of their X-ray/infrared properties and spatial distributions, nearly 8500 point sources have been identified as probable young stellar members of the SFiNCs regions. Compared to the existing X-ray/mid-infrared publications, the SFiNCs member list increases the census of YSO members by 6%–200% for individual SFRs and by 40% for the merged sample of all 22 SFiNCs SFRs.},
doi = {10.3847/1538-4365/229/2/28},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal, Supplement Series},
number = 2,
volume = 229,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Sat Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
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