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Title: A Self-consistent Model for a Full Cycle of Recurrent Novae—Wind Mass-loss Rate and X-Ray Luminosity

Abstract

An unexpectedly slow evolution in the pre-optical-maximum phase was suggested in the very short recurrence period of nova M31N 2008-12a. To obtain reasonable nova light curves we have improved our calculation method by consistently combining optically thick wind solutions of hydrogen-rich envelopes with white dwarf (WD) structures calculated by a Henyey-type evolution code. The wind mass-loss rate is properly determined with high accuracy. We have calculated light curve models for 1.2 M {sub ⊙} and 1.38 M {sub ⊙} WDs with mass accretion rates corresponding to recurrence periods of 10 yr and 1 yr, respectively. The outburst lasts 590/29 days, in which the pre-optical-maximum phase is 82/16 days, for 1.2/1.38 M {sub ⊙}, respectively. Optically thick winds start at the end of the X-ray flash and cease at the beginning of the supersoft X-ray phase. We also present supersoft X-ray light curves including a prompt X-ray flash and later supersoft X-ray phase.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Department of Astronomy, Keio University, Hiyoshi, Yokohama 223-8521 (Japan)
  2. Astronomical Institute, Graduate School of Science, Tohoku University, Sendai, 980-8578 (Japan)
  3. Department of Earth Science and Astronomy, College of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22661175
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 838; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; ACCURACY; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; EVOLUTION; LUMINOSITY; MASS TRANSFER; NOVAE; STELLAR WINDS; VISIBLE RADIATION; WHITE DWARF STARS; X RADIATION

Citation Formats

Kato, Mariko, Saio, Hideyuki, and Hachisu, Izumi, E-mail: mariko.kato@hc.st.keio.ac.jp. A Self-consistent Model for a Full Cycle of Recurrent Novae—Wind Mass-loss Rate and X-Ray Luminosity. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/838/2/153.
Kato, Mariko, Saio, Hideyuki, & Hachisu, Izumi, E-mail: mariko.kato@hc.st.keio.ac.jp. A Self-consistent Model for a Full Cycle of Recurrent Novae—Wind Mass-loss Rate and X-Ray Luminosity. United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/838/2/153.
Kato, Mariko, Saio, Hideyuki, and Hachisu, Izumi, E-mail: mariko.kato@hc.st.keio.ac.jp. Sat . "A Self-consistent Model for a Full Cycle of Recurrent Novae—Wind Mass-loss Rate and X-Ray Luminosity". United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/838/2/153.
@article{osti_22661175,
title = {A Self-consistent Model for a Full Cycle of Recurrent Novae—Wind Mass-loss Rate and X-Ray Luminosity},
author = {Kato, Mariko and Saio, Hideyuki and Hachisu, Izumi, E-mail: mariko.kato@hc.st.keio.ac.jp},
abstractNote = {An unexpectedly slow evolution in the pre-optical-maximum phase was suggested in the very short recurrence period of nova M31N 2008-12a. To obtain reasonable nova light curves we have improved our calculation method by consistently combining optically thick wind solutions of hydrogen-rich envelopes with white dwarf (WD) structures calculated by a Henyey-type evolution code. The wind mass-loss rate is properly determined with high accuracy. We have calculated light curve models for 1.2 M {sub ⊙} and 1.38 M {sub ⊙} WDs with mass accretion rates corresponding to recurrence periods of 10 yr and 1 yr, respectively. The outburst lasts 590/29 days, in which the pre-optical-maximum phase is 82/16 days, for 1.2/1.38 M {sub ⊙}, respectively. Optically thick winds start at the end of the X-ray flash and cease at the beginning of the supersoft X-ray phase. We also present supersoft X-ray light curves including a prompt X-ray flash and later supersoft X-ray phase.},
doi = {10.3847/1538-4357/838/2/153},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
number = 2,
volume = 838,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Sat Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
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