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Title: First Search for Gravitational Waves from Known Pulsars with Advanced LIGO

Abstract

We present the result of searches for gravitational waves from 200 pulsars using data from the first observing run of the Advanced LIGO detectors. We find no significant evidence for a gravitational-wave signal from any of these pulsars, but we are able to set the most constraining upper limits yet on their gravitational-wave amplitudes and ellipticities. For eight of these pulsars, our upper limits give bounds that are improvements over the indirect spin-down limit values. For another 32, we are within a factor of 10 of the spin-down limit, and it is likely that some of these will be reachable in future runs of the advanced detector. Taken as a whole, these new results improve on previous limits by more than a factor of two.

Authors:
; ;  [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [6];  [7];  [8]; ; ;  [9]; ;  [10];  [11];  [12];  [13];  [14];  [15] more »; ; « less
  1. LIGO, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)
  2. Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States)
  3. American University, Washington, DC 20016 (United States)
  4. Università di Salerno, Fisciano, I-84084 Salerno (Italy)
  5. University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)
  6. LIGO Livingston Observatory, Livingston, LA 70754 (United States)
  7. Laboratoire d’Annecy-le-Vieux de Physique des Particules (LAPP), Université Savoie Mont Blanc, CNRS/IN2P3, F-74941 Annecy-le-Vieux (France)
  8. University of Sannio at Benevento, I-82100 Benevento, Italy and INFN, Sezione di Napoli, I-80100 Napoli (Italy)
  9. Albert-Einstein-Institut, Max-Planck-Institut für Gravitationsphysik, D-30167 Hannover (Germany)
  10. Nikhef, Science Park, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands)
  11. LIGO, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)
  12. Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, 12227-010 São José dos Campos, São Paulo (Brazil)
  13. INFN, Gran Sasso Science Institute, I-67100 L’Aquila (Italy)
  14. Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pune 411007 (India)
  15. International Centre for Theoretical Sciences, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Bengaluru 560089 (India)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22661167
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 839; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; AMPLITUDES; GRAVITATIONAL WAVE DETECTORS; GRAVITATIONAL WAVES; INTERFEROMETRY; PULSARS; SIGNALS; SPIN

Citation Formats

Abbott, B. P., Abbott, R., Adhikari, R. X., Abbott, T. D., Abernathy, M. R., Acernese, F., Ackley, K., Adams, C., Adams, T., Addesso, P., Adya, V. B., Affeldt, C., Allen, B., Agathos, M., Agatsuma, K., Aggarwal, N., Aguiar, O. D., Aiello, L., Ain, A., Ajith, P., Collaboration: LIGO Scientific Collaboration and Virgo Collaboration, and and others. First Search for Gravitational Waves from Known Pulsars with Advanced LIGO. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/AA677F.
Abbott, B. P., Abbott, R., Adhikari, R. X., Abbott, T. D., Abernathy, M. R., Acernese, F., Ackley, K., Adams, C., Adams, T., Addesso, P., Adya, V. B., Affeldt, C., Allen, B., Agathos, M., Agatsuma, K., Aggarwal, N., Aguiar, O. D., Aiello, L., Ain, A., Ajith, P., Collaboration: LIGO Scientific Collaboration and Virgo Collaboration, & and others. First Search for Gravitational Waves from Known Pulsars with Advanced LIGO. United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/AA677F.
Abbott, B. P., Abbott, R., Adhikari, R. X., Abbott, T. D., Abernathy, M. R., Acernese, F., Ackley, K., Adams, C., Adams, T., Addesso, P., Adya, V. B., Affeldt, C., Allen, B., Agathos, M., Agatsuma, K., Aggarwal, N., Aguiar, O. D., Aiello, L., Ain, A., Ajith, P., Collaboration: LIGO Scientific Collaboration and Virgo Collaboration, and and others. Mon . "First Search for Gravitational Waves from Known Pulsars with Advanced LIGO". United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/AA677F.
@article{osti_22661167,
title = {First Search for Gravitational Waves from Known Pulsars with Advanced LIGO},
author = {Abbott, B. P. and Abbott, R. and Adhikari, R. X. and Abbott, T. D. and Abernathy, M. R. and Acernese, F. and Ackley, K. and Adams, C. and Adams, T. and Addesso, P. and Adya, V. B. and Affeldt, C. and Allen, B. and Agathos, M. and Agatsuma, K. and Aggarwal, N. and Aguiar, O. D. and Aiello, L. and Ain, A. and Ajith, P. and Collaboration: LIGO Scientific Collaboration and Virgo Collaboration and and others},
abstractNote = {We present the result of searches for gravitational waves from 200 pulsars using data from the first observing run of the Advanced LIGO detectors. We find no significant evidence for a gravitational-wave signal from any of these pulsars, but we are able to set the most constraining upper limits yet on their gravitational-wave amplitudes and ellipticities. For eight of these pulsars, our upper limits give bounds that are improvements over the indirect spin-down limit values. For another 32, we are within a factor of 10 of the spin-down limit, and it is likely that some of these will be reachable in future runs of the advanced detector. Taken as a whole, these new results improve on previous limits by more than a factor of two.},
doi = {10.3847/1538-4357/AA677F},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
number = 1,
volume = 839,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Apr 10 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon Apr 10 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
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