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Title: Feedback Limits to Maximum Seed Masses of Black Holes

Abstract

The most massive black holes observed in the universe weigh up to ∼10{sup 10} M {sub ⊙}, nearly independent of redshift. Reaching these final masses likely required copious accretion and several major mergers. Employing a dynamical approach that rests on the role played by a new, relevant physical scale—the transition radius—we provide a theoretical calculation of the maximum mass achievable by a black hole seed that forms in an isolated halo, one that scarcely merged. Incorporating effects at the transition radius and their impact on the evolution of accretion in isolated halos, we are able to obtain new limits for permitted growth. We find that large black hole seeds ( M {sub •} ≳ 10{sup 4} M {sub ⊙}) hosted in small isolated halos ( M {sub h} ≲ 10{sup 9} M {sub ⊙}) accreting with relatively small radiative efficiencies ( ϵ ≲ 0.1) grow optimally in these circumstances. Moreover, we show that the standard M {sub •}– σ relation observed at z ∼ 0 cannot be established in isolated halos at high- z , but requires the occurrence of mergers. Since the average limiting mass of black holes formed at z ≳ 10 is in the range 10{sup 4–6}more » M {sub ⊙}, we expect to observe them in local galaxies as intermediate-mass black holes, when hosted in the rare halos that experienced only minor or no merging events. Such ancient black holes, formed in isolation with subsequent scant growth, could survive, almost unchanged, until present.« less

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]
  1. Department of Physics, Yale University, P.O. Box 208121, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States)
  2. Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza dei Cavalieri 7, I-56126 Pisa (Italy)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22654560
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal Letters; Journal Volume: 835; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; ACCRETION DISKS; BLACK HOLES; COSMOLOGY; EFFICIENCY; EVOLUTION; FEEDBACK; MASS; MILKY WAY; QUASARS; RED SHIFT; STARS; UNIVERSE

Citation Formats

Pacucci, Fabio, Natarajan, Priyamvada, and Ferrara, Andrea. Feedback Limits to Maximum Seed Masses of Black Holes. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.3847/2041-8213/835/2/L36.
Pacucci, Fabio, Natarajan, Priyamvada, & Ferrara, Andrea. Feedback Limits to Maximum Seed Masses of Black Holes. United States. doi:10.3847/2041-8213/835/2/L36.
Pacucci, Fabio, Natarajan, Priyamvada, and Ferrara, Andrea. Wed . "Feedback Limits to Maximum Seed Masses of Black Holes". United States. doi:10.3847/2041-8213/835/2/L36.
@article{osti_22654560,
title = {Feedback Limits to Maximum Seed Masses of Black Holes},
author = {Pacucci, Fabio and Natarajan, Priyamvada and Ferrara, Andrea},
abstractNote = {The most massive black holes observed in the universe weigh up to ∼10{sup 10} M {sub ⊙}, nearly independent of redshift. Reaching these final masses likely required copious accretion and several major mergers. Employing a dynamical approach that rests on the role played by a new, relevant physical scale—the transition radius—we provide a theoretical calculation of the maximum mass achievable by a black hole seed that forms in an isolated halo, one that scarcely merged. Incorporating effects at the transition radius and their impact on the evolution of accretion in isolated halos, we are able to obtain new limits for permitted growth. We find that large black hole seeds ( M {sub •} ≳ 10{sup 4} M {sub ⊙}) hosted in small isolated halos ( M {sub h} ≲ 10{sup 9} M {sub ⊙}) accreting with relatively small radiative efficiencies ( ϵ ≲ 0.1) grow optimally in these circumstances. Moreover, we show that the standard M {sub •}– σ relation observed at z ∼ 0 cannot be established in isolated halos at high- z , but requires the occurrence of mergers. Since the average limiting mass of black holes formed at z ≳ 10 is in the range 10{sup 4–6} M {sub ⊙}, we expect to observe them in local galaxies as intermediate-mass black holes, when hosted in the rare halos that experienced only minor or no merging events. Such ancient black holes, formed in isolation with subsequent scant growth, could survive, almost unchanged, until present.},
doi = {10.3847/2041-8213/835/2/L36},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal Letters},
number = 2,
volume = 835,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}
  • In this third paper of a series, we study the growth and luminosity of black holes (BHs) in motion with respect to their surrounding medium. We run a large set of two-dimensional axis-symmetric simulations to explore a large parameter space of initial conditions and formulate an analytical model for the accretion. Contrary to the case without radiation feedback, the accretion rate increases with increasing BH velocity v{sub bh} reaching a maximum value at v{sub bh} = 2c{sub s,in} {approx} 50 km s{sup -1}, where c{sub s,in} is the sound speed inside the ''cometary-shaped'' H II region around the BH, beforemore » decreasing as v{sub bh}{sup -3} when the ionization front (I-front) becomes R-type (rarefied) and the accretion rate approaches the classical Bondi-Hoyle-Lyttleton solution. The increase of the accretion rate with v{sub bh} is produced by the formation of a D-type (dense) I-front preceded by a standing bow shock that reduces the downstream gas velocity to transonic values. There is a range of densities and velocities where the dense shell is unstable producing periodic accretion rate peaks which can significantly increase the detectability of intermediate-mass BHs. We find that the mean accretion rate for a moving BH is larger than that of a stationary BH of the same mass if the medium temperature is T{sub {infinity}} < 10{sup 4} K. This result could be important for the growth of seed BHs in the multi-phase medium of the first galaxies and for building an early X-ray background that may affect the formation of the first galaxies and the reionization process.« less
  • In the last decade, the growth of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) has been intricately linked to galaxy formation and evolution and is a key ingredient in the assembly of galaxies. To investigate the origin of SMBHs, we perform cosmological simulations that target the direct collapse black hole seed formation scenario in the presence of two different strong Lyman-Werner (LW) background fields. These simulations include the X-ray irradiation from a central massive black hole (MBH), H{sub 2} self-shielding, and stellar feedback from metal-free and metal-enriched stars. We find in both simulations that local X-ray feedback induces metal-free star formation ∼0.5 Myrmore » after the MBH forms. The MBH accretion rate reaches a maximum of 10{sup –3} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} in both simulations. However, the duty cycle differs and is derived to be 6% and 50% for the high and low LW cases, respectively. The MBH in the high LW case grows only ∼6% in 100 Myr compared to 16% in the low LW case. We find that the maximum accretion rate is determined by the local gas thermodynamics, whereas the duty cycle is determined by the large-scale gas dynamics and gas reservoir. We conclude that radiative feedback from the central MBH plays an important role in star formation in the nuclear regions and stifling initial MBH growth relative to the typical Eddington rate argument, and that initial MBH growth might be affected by the local LW radiation field.« less
  • By using high-resolution one-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations, we investigate the effects of purely mechanical feedback from super massive black holes (SMBHs) in the evolution of elliptical galaxies for a broad range of feedback efficiencies and compare the results to four major observational constraints. In particular, we focus on (1) the central black hole to stellar mass ratio of the host galaxy, (2) the lifetime of the luminous quasar phase, (3) the mass of stars formed in the host galaxy within the last Gyr, and (4) the X-ray luminosity of the hot diffuse gas. As a result, we try to pin downmore » the most successful range of mechanical feedback efficiencies. We find that while low feedback efficiencies result in too much growth of the SMBH, high efficiencies totally blow out the hot interstellar gas, and the models are characterized by very low thermal X-ray luminosity well below the observed range. The net lifetime of the quasar phase is strongly coupled to the mass ratio between SMBH and its host galaxy, while the X-ray luminosity is generally correlated to the recent star formation within the last Gyr. When considering the popularly adopted model of the constant feedback efficiency, the feedback energy deposited into the ambient medium should be more than 0.01% of the SMBH accretion energy to be consistent with the SMBH mass to stellar mass ratio in the local universe. Yet, the X-ray luminosity of the hot gas favors about 0.005% of the accretion energy as the mechanical active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback energy. We conclude that the purely mechanical feedback mode is unlikely to be simultaneously compatible with all four observable tests, even allowing a broad range of feedback efficiencies, and that including both radiative and mechanical feedback together may be a solution to comply with the observational constraints. In addition to the adopted observational constraints, our simulations also show that the ratio of SMBH growth rate over its current mass and the density and temperature distribution of hot gas can be useful observable diagnostics for AGN feedback efficiencies.« less
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