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Title: INWARD RADIAL MIXING OF INTERSTELLAR WATER ICES IN THE SOLAR PROTOPLANETARY DISK

Abstract

The very wide diversity of asteroid compositions in the main belt suggests significant material transport in the solar protoplanetary disk and hints at the presence of interstellar ices in hydrated bodies. However, only a few quantitative estimations of the contribution of interstellar ice in the inner solar system have been reported, leading to considerable uncertainty about the extent of radial inward mixing in the solar protoplanetary disk 4.56 Ga ago. We show that the pristine CM chondrite Paris contains primary Ca-carbonates whose O-isotopic compositions require an 8%–35% contribution from interstellar water. The presence of interstellar water in Paris is confirmed by its bulk D/H isotopic composition that shows significant D enrichment (D/H = (167 ± 0.2) × 10{sup −6}) relative to the mean D/H of CM chondrites ((145 ± 3) × 10{sup −6}) and the putative D/H of local CM water ((82 ± 1.5) × 10{sup −6}). These results imply that (i) efficient radial mixing of interstellar ices occurred from the outer zone of the solar protoplanetary disk inward and that (ii) chondrites accreted water ice grains from increasing heliocentric distances in the solar protoplanetary disk.

Authors:
; ;  [1]; ;  [2]
  1. CRPG, CNRS, Université de Lorraine, UMR 7358, Vandoeuvre-lés-Nancy, F-54501 (France)
  2. IMPMC, MNHN, UPMC, UMR CNRS 7590, 61 rue Buffon, F-75005 Paris (France)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22654541
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal Letters; Journal Volume: 827; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; ASTEROIDS; CALCIUM CARBONATES; CARBONATES; CHONDRITES; DEUTERIUM; HYDRATES; HYDROGEN; ICE; INTERSTELLAR SPACE; ISOTOPE RATIO; METEOROIDS; OXYGEN ISOTOPES; PLANETS; PROTOPLANETS; SOLAR SYSTEM; SPACE; WATER

Citation Formats

Vacher, Lionel G., Marrocchi, Yves, Villeneuve, Johan, Verdier-Paoletti, Maximilien J., and Gounelle, Matthieu, E-mail: lvacher@crpg.cnrs-nancy.fr. INWARD RADIAL MIXING OF INTERSTELLAR WATER ICES IN THE SOLAR PROTOPLANETARY DISK. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.3847/2041-8205/827/1/L1.
Vacher, Lionel G., Marrocchi, Yves, Villeneuve, Johan, Verdier-Paoletti, Maximilien J., & Gounelle, Matthieu, E-mail: lvacher@crpg.cnrs-nancy.fr. INWARD RADIAL MIXING OF INTERSTELLAR WATER ICES IN THE SOLAR PROTOPLANETARY DISK. United States. doi:10.3847/2041-8205/827/1/L1.
Vacher, Lionel G., Marrocchi, Yves, Villeneuve, Johan, Verdier-Paoletti, Maximilien J., and Gounelle, Matthieu, E-mail: lvacher@crpg.cnrs-nancy.fr. 2016. "INWARD RADIAL MIXING OF INTERSTELLAR WATER ICES IN THE SOLAR PROTOPLANETARY DISK". United States. doi:10.3847/2041-8205/827/1/L1.
@article{osti_22654541,
title = {INWARD RADIAL MIXING OF INTERSTELLAR WATER ICES IN THE SOLAR PROTOPLANETARY DISK},
author = {Vacher, Lionel G. and Marrocchi, Yves and Villeneuve, Johan and Verdier-Paoletti, Maximilien J. and Gounelle, Matthieu, E-mail: lvacher@crpg.cnrs-nancy.fr},
abstractNote = {The very wide diversity of asteroid compositions in the main belt suggests significant material transport in the solar protoplanetary disk and hints at the presence of interstellar ices in hydrated bodies. However, only a few quantitative estimations of the contribution of interstellar ice in the inner solar system have been reported, leading to considerable uncertainty about the extent of radial inward mixing in the solar protoplanetary disk 4.56 Ga ago. We show that the pristine CM chondrite Paris contains primary Ca-carbonates whose O-isotopic compositions require an 8%–35% contribution from interstellar water. The presence of interstellar water in Paris is confirmed by its bulk D/H isotopic composition that shows significant D enrichment (D/H = (167 ± 0.2) × 10{sup −6}) relative to the mean D/H of CM chondrites ((145 ± 3) × 10{sup −6}) and the putative D/H of local CM water ((82 ± 1.5) × 10{sup −6}). These results imply that (i) efficient radial mixing of interstellar ices occurred from the outer zone of the solar protoplanetary disk inward and that (ii) chondrites accreted water ice grains from increasing heliocentric distances in the solar protoplanetary disk.},
doi = {10.3847/2041-8205/827/1/L1},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal Letters},
number = 1,
volume = 827,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}
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