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Title: Searching for Rapid Orbital Decay of WASP-18b

Abstract

The WASP-18 system, with its massive and extremely close-in planet, WASP-18b ( M{sub p} = 10.3 M{sub J}, a = 0.02 au, P = 22.6 hr), is one of the best-known exoplanet laboratories to directly measure Q ′, the modified tidal quality factor and proxy for efficiency of tidal dissipation, of the host star. Previous analysis predicted a rapid orbital decay of the planet toward its host star that should be measurable on the timescale of a few years, if the star is as dissipative as is inferred from the circularization of close-in solar-type binary stars. We have compiled published transit and secondary eclipse timing (as observed by WASP, TRAPPIST, and Spitzer ) with more recent unpublished light curves (as observed by TRAPPIST and Hubble Space Telescope ) with coverage spanning nine years. We find no signature of a rapid decay. We conclude that the absence of rapid orbital decay most likely derives from Q ′ being larger than was inferred from solar-type stars and find that Q ′ ≥ 1 × 10{sup 6}, at 95% confidence; this supports previous work suggesting that F stars, with their convective cores and thin convective envelopes, are significantly less tidally dissipative than solar-typemore » stars, with radiative cores and large convective envelopes.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1];  [2];  [3]; ;  [4]
  1. Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-2421 (United States)
  2. Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, J J Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom)
  3. Department of Applied Mathematics, School of Mathematics, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)
  4. Space Sciences, Technologies and Astrophysics Research (STAR) Institute, Université de Liège, allée du 6 Août 19C, B-4000 Lige (Belgium)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22654536
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal Letters; Journal Volume: 836; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; BINARY STARS; BORON 18; DECAY; ECLIPSE; EFFICIENCY; PLANETS; QUALITY FACTOR; SATELLITE ATMOSPHERES; SATELLITES; SPACE; TELESCOPES; VISIBLE RADIATION

Citation Formats

Wilkins, Ashlee N., Deming, Drake, Hamilton, Douglas, Delrez, Laetitia, Barker, Adrian J., Gillon, Michael, and Jehin, Emmanuel, E-mail: awilkins@astro.umd.edu. Searching for Rapid Orbital Decay of WASP-18b. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.3847/2041-8213/AA5D9F.
Wilkins, Ashlee N., Deming, Drake, Hamilton, Douglas, Delrez, Laetitia, Barker, Adrian J., Gillon, Michael, & Jehin, Emmanuel, E-mail: awilkins@astro.umd.edu. Searching for Rapid Orbital Decay of WASP-18b. United States. doi:10.3847/2041-8213/AA5D9F.
Wilkins, Ashlee N., Deming, Drake, Hamilton, Douglas, Delrez, Laetitia, Barker, Adrian J., Gillon, Michael, and Jehin, Emmanuel, E-mail: awilkins@astro.umd.edu. Mon . "Searching for Rapid Orbital Decay of WASP-18b". United States. doi:10.3847/2041-8213/AA5D9F.
@article{osti_22654536,
title = {Searching for Rapid Orbital Decay of WASP-18b},
author = {Wilkins, Ashlee N. and Deming, Drake and Hamilton, Douglas and Delrez, Laetitia and Barker, Adrian J. and Gillon, Michael and Jehin, Emmanuel, E-mail: awilkins@astro.umd.edu},
abstractNote = {The WASP-18 system, with its massive and extremely close-in planet, WASP-18b ( M{sub p} = 10.3 M{sub J}, a = 0.02 au, P = 22.6 hr), is one of the best-known exoplanet laboratories to directly measure Q ′, the modified tidal quality factor and proxy for efficiency of tidal dissipation, of the host star. Previous analysis predicted a rapid orbital decay of the planet toward its host star that should be measurable on the timescale of a few years, if the star is as dissipative as is inferred from the circularization of close-in solar-type binary stars. We have compiled published transit and secondary eclipse timing (as observed by WASP, TRAPPIST, and Spitzer ) with more recent unpublished light curves (as observed by TRAPPIST and Hubble Space Telescope ) with coverage spanning nine years. We find no signature of a rapid decay. We conclude that the absence of rapid orbital decay most likely derives from Q ′ being larger than was inferred from solar-type stars and find that Q ′ ≥ 1 × 10{sup 6}, at 95% confidence; this supports previous work suggesting that F stars, with their convective cores and thin convective envelopes, are significantly less tidally dissipative than solar-type stars, with radiative cores and large convective envelopes.},
doi = {10.3847/2041-8213/AA5D9F},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal Letters},
number = 2,
volume = 836,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Feb 20 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Mon Feb 20 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}
  • The transiting exoplanet WASP-18b was discovered in 2008 by the Wide Angle Search for Planets project. The Spitzer Exoplanet Target of Opportunity Program observed secondary eclipses of WASP-18b using Spitzer's Infrared Array Camera in the 3.6 {mu}m and 5.8 {mu}m bands on 2008 December 20, and in the 4.5 {mu}m and 8.0 {mu}m bands on 2008 December 24. We report eclipse depths of 0.30% {+-} 0.02%, 0.39% {+-} 0.02%, 0.37% {+-} 0.03%, 0.41% {+-} 0.02%, and brightness temperatures of 3100 {+-} 90, 3310 {+-} 130, 3080 {+-} 140, and 3120 {+-} 110 K in order of increasing wavelength. WASP-18b ismore » one of the hottest planets yet discovered-as hot as an M-class star. The planet's pressure-temperature profile most likely features a thermal inversion. The observations also require WASP-18b to have near-zero albedo and almost no redistribution of energy from the day side to the night side of the planet.« less
  • We report the detection of orbital decay in the 12.75-minute, detached binary white dwarf (WD) SDSS J065133.338+284423.37 (hereafter J0651). Our photometric observations over a 13 month baseline constrain the orbital period to 765.206543(55) s and indicate that the orbit is decreasing at a rate of (- 9.8 {+-} 2.8) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -12} s s{sup -1} (or -0.31 {+-} 0.09 ms yr{sup -1}). We revise the system parameters based on our new photometric and spectroscopic observations: J0651 contains two WDs with M{sub 1} = 0.26 {+-} 0.04 M{sub Sun} and M{sub 2} = 0.50 {+-} 0.04 M{sub Sun }. General relativitymore » predicts orbital decay due to gravitational wave radiation of (- 8.2 {+-} 1.7) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -12} s s{sup -1} (or -0.26 {+-} 0.05 ms yr{sup -1}). Our observed rate of orbital decay is consistent with this expectation. J0651 is currently the second-loudest gravitational wave source known in the milli-Hertz range and the loudest non-interacting binary, which makes it an excellent verification source for future missions aimed at directly detecting gravitational waves. Our work establishes the feasibility of monitoring this system's orbital period decay at optical wavelengths.« less
  • We measure the 4.5 μ m thermal emission of five transiting hot Jupiters, WASP-13b, WASP-15b, WASP-16b, WASP-62b, and HAT-P-22b using channel 2 of the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) on the Spitzer Space Telescope . Significant intrapixel sensitivity variations in Spitzer IRAC data require careful correction in order to achieve precision on the order of several hundred parts per million (ppm) for the measurement of exoplanet secondary eclipses. We determine eclipse depths by first correcting the raw data using three independent data reduction methods. The Pixel Gain Map (PMAP), Nearest Neighbors (NNBR), and Pixel Level Decorrelation (PLD) each correct for themore » intrapixel sensitivity effect in Spitzer photometric time-series observations. The results from each methodology are compared against each other to establish if they reach a statistically equivalent result in every case and to evaluate their ability to minimize uncertainty in the measurement. We find that all three methods produce reliable results. For every planet examined here NNBR and PLD produce results that are in statistical agreement. However, the PMAP method appears to produce results in slight disagreement in cases where the stellar centroid is not kept consistently on the most well characterized area of the detector. We evaluate the ability of each method to reduce the scatter in the residuals as well as in the correlated noise in the corrected data. The NNBR and PLD methods consistently minimize both white and red noise levels and should be considered reliable and consistent. The planets in this study span equilibrium temperatures from 1100 to 2000 K and have brightness temperatures that require either high albedo or efficient recirculation. However, it is possible that other processes such as clouds or disequilibrium chemistry may also be responsible for producing these brightness temperatures.« less
  • We report the detection of WASP-35b, a planet transiting a metal-poor ([Fe/H] = -0.15) star in the Southern hemisphere, WASP-48b, an inflated planet which may have spun-up its slightly evolved host star of 1.75 R{sub sun} in the Northern hemisphere, and the independent discovery of HAT-P-30b/WASP-51b, a new planet in the Northern hemisphere. Using WASP, RISE, Faulkes Telescope South, and TRAPPIST photometry, with CORALIE, SOPHIE, and NOT spectroscopy, we determine that WASP-35b has a mass of 0.72 {+-} 0.06 M{sub J} and radius of 1.32 {+-} 0.05R{sub J} , and orbits with a period of 3.16 days, WASP-48b has amore » mass of 0.98 {+-} 0.09 M{sub J} , radius of 1.67 {+-} 0.10 R{sub J} , and orbits in 2.14 days, while HAT-P-30b/WASP-51b, with an orbital period of 2.81 days, is found to have a mass of 0.76 {+-} 0.05 M{sub J} and radius of 1.42 {+-} 0.03 R{sub J} , agreeing with values of 0.71 {+-} 0.03 M{sub J} and 1.34 {+-} 0.07 R{sub J} reported for HAT-P-30b.« less