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Title: Recalibration of the M {sub BH}– σ {sub ⋆} Relation for AGN

Abstract

We present a recalibration of the M {sub BH}– σ {sub ⋆} relation, based on a sample of 16 reverberation-mapped galaxies with newly determined bulge stellar velocity dispersions ( σ {sub ⋆}) from integral-field spectroscopy (IFS), and a sample of 32 quiescent galaxies with publicly available IFS. For both samples, σ {sub ⋆} is determined via two different methods that are popular in the literature, and we provide fits for each sample based on both sets of σ {sub ⋆}. We find the fit to the active galactic nucleus sample is shallower than the fit to the quiescent galaxy sample, and that the slopes for each sample are in agreement with previous investigations. However, the intercepts to the quiescent galaxy relations are notably higher than those found in previous studies, due to the systematically lower σ {sub ⋆} measurements that we obtain from IFS. We find that this may be driven, in part, by poorly constrained measurements of bulge effective radius ( r{sub e}) for the quiescent galaxy sample, which may bias the σ {sub ⋆} measurements low. We use these quiescent galaxy parameterizations, as well as one from the literature, to recalculate the virial scaling factor f . Wemore » assess the potential biases in each measurement, and suggest f = 4.82 ± 1.67 as the best currently available estimate. However, we caution that the details of how σ {sub ⋆} is measured can significantly affect f , and there is still much room for improvement.« less

Authors:
;  [1]; ;  [2];  [3]
  1. Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, 25 Park Place, Atlanta, GA 30303 (United States)
  2. Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø (Denmark)
  3. Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22654508
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal Letters; Journal Volume: 838; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; CALIBRATION; DISPERSIONS; GALAXIES; SPECTROSCOPY; VELOCITY

Citation Formats

Batiste, Merida, Bentz, Misty C., Raimundo, Sandra I., Vestergaard, Marianne, and Onken, Christopher A., E-mail: batiste@astro.gsu.edu. Recalibration of the M {sub BH}– σ {sub ⋆} Relation for AGN. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.3847/2041-8213/AA6571.
Batiste, Merida, Bentz, Misty C., Raimundo, Sandra I., Vestergaard, Marianne, & Onken, Christopher A., E-mail: batiste@astro.gsu.edu. Recalibration of the M {sub BH}– σ {sub ⋆} Relation for AGN. United States. doi:10.3847/2041-8213/AA6571.
Batiste, Merida, Bentz, Misty C., Raimundo, Sandra I., Vestergaard, Marianne, and Onken, Christopher A., E-mail: batiste@astro.gsu.edu. Mon . "Recalibration of the M {sub BH}– σ {sub ⋆} Relation for AGN". United States. doi:10.3847/2041-8213/AA6571.
@article{osti_22654508,
title = {Recalibration of the M {sub BH}– σ {sub ⋆} Relation for AGN},
author = {Batiste, Merida and Bentz, Misty C. and Raimundo, Sandra I. and Vestergaard, Marianne and Onken, Christopher A., E-mail: batiste@astro.gsu.edu},
abstractNote = {We present a recalibration of the M {sub BH}– σ {sub ⋆} relation, based on a sample of 16 reverberation-mapped galaxies with newly determined bulge stellar velocity dispersions ( σ {sub ⋆}) from integral-field spectroscopy (IFS), and a sample of 32 quiescent galaxies with publicly available IFS. For both samples, σ {sub ⋆} is determined via two different methods that are popular in the literature, and we provide fits for each sample based on both sets of σ {sub ⋆}. We find the fit to the active galactic nucleus sample is shallower than the fit to the quiescent galaxy sample, and that the slopes for each sample are in agreement with previous investigations. However, the intercepts to the quiescent galaxy relations are notably higher than those found in previous studies, due to the systematically lower σ {sub ⋆} measurements that we obtain from IFS. We find that this may be driven, in part, by poorly constrained measurements of bulge effective radius ( r{sub e}) for the quiescent galaxy sample, which may bias the σ {sub ⋆} measurements low. We use these quiescent galaxy parameterizations, as well as one from the literature, to recalculate the virial scaling factor f . We assess the potential biases in each measurement, and suggest f = 4.82 ± 1.67 as the best currently available estimate. However, we caution that the details of how σ {sub ⋆} is measured can significantly affect f , and there is still much room for improvement.},
doi = {10.3847/2041-8213/AA6571},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal Letters},
number = 1,
volume = 838,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Mar 20 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon Mar 20 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
  • Determining the virial factor of the broad-line region gas is crucial for calibrating active galactic nucleus black hole mass estimators, since the measured line-of-sight velocity needs to be converted into the intrinsic virial velocity. The average virial factor has been empirically calibrated based on the M{sub BH}-{sigma}{sub *} relation of quiescent galaxies, but the claimed values differ by a factor of two in recent studies. We investigate the origin of the difference by measuring the M{sub BH}-{sigma}{sub *} relation using an updated galaxy sample from the literature and explore the dependence of the virial factor on various fitting methods. Wemore » find that the discrepancy is primarily caused by the sample selection, while the difference stemming from the various regression methods is marginal. However, we generally prefer the FITEXY and Bayesian estimators based on Monte Carlo simulations for the M{sub BH}-{sigma}{sub *} relation. In addition, the choice of independent variable in the regression leads to {approx}0.2 dex variation in the virial factor inferred from the calibration process. Based on the determined virial factor, we present the updated M{sub BH}-{sigma}{sub *} relation of local active galaxies.« less
  • Using X-ray stacking analyses we estimate the average amounts of supermassive black hole (SMBH) growth taking place in star-forming galaxies at z {approx} 1 and z {approx} 2 as a function of galaxy stellar mass (M{sub *}). We find that the average SMBH growth rate follows remarkably similar trends with M{sub *} and redshift as the average star formation rates (SFRs) of their host galaxies (i.e., M-dot{sub BH} {proportional_to} M{sub *}{sup 0.86{+-}0.39} for the z {approx} 1 sample and M-dot{sub BH} {proportional_to} M{sub *}{sup 1.05{+-}0.36} for the z {approx} 2 sample). It follows that the ratio of SMBH growth ratemore » to SFR is (1) flat with respect to M{sub *}, (2) not evolving with redshift, and (3) close to the ratio required to maintain/establish an SMBH to stellar mass ratio of Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -3} as also inferred from today's M{sub BH}-M{sub Bulge} relationship. We interpret this as evidence that SMBHs have, on average, grown in step with their host galaxies since at least z {approx} 2, irrespective of host galaxy mass and active galactic nucleus triggering mechanism. As such, we suggest that the same secular processes that drive the bulk of star formation are also responsible for the majority of SMBH growth. From this, we speculate that it is the availability of gas reservoirs that regulate both cosmological SMBH growth and star formation.« less
  • We propose a possible scenario that can explain the physical processes underlying the relation log{sub 10}(M {sub BH}) = b + mlog{sub 10}(M {sub G}σ{sup 2}/c {sup 2}) between the mass M {sub BH} of supermassive black holes, growing in the center of many galaxies, and the kinetic energy of the corresponding bulges (M {sub G} being the bulge mass and σ the velocity dispersion). In a series of papers, this scaling law proved to be very useful to describe the evolution of galaxies thanks to its close similarity to the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. Studying the relation with different samples ofmore » galaxies, we have generally found a slope that can vary between two extremal theoretical possibilities, m = 3/4 and m = 1. We will try to describe a possible scenario compatible with the second one. Finally, we also examine a case of a relation that is linear, not in kinetic energy, but in momentum parameter.« less
  • To investigate the black hole mass versus stellar velocity dispersion (M {sub BH}-{sigma}{sub *}) relation of active galaxies, we measured the velocity dispersions of a sample of local Seyfert 1 galaxies, for which we have recently determined black hole masses using reverberation mapping. For most objects, stellar velocity dispersions were measured from high signal-to-noise ratio optical spectra centered on the Ca II triplet region ({approx}8500 A), obtained at the Keck, Palomar, and Lick Observatories. For two objects, in which the Ca II triplet region was contaminated by nuclear emission, the measurement was based on high-quality H-band spectra obtained with themore » OH-Suppressing Infrared Imaging Spectrograph at the Keck-II telescope. Combining our new measurements with data from the literature, we assemble a sample of 24 active galaxies with stellar velocity dispersions and reverberation-based black hole mass measurements in the range of black hole mass 10{sup 6} < M {sub BH}/M {sub sun} < 10{sup 9}. We use this sample to obtain reverberation-mapping constraints on the slope and intrinsic scatter of the M {sub BH}-{sigma}{sub *} relation of active galaxies. Assuming a constant virial coefficient f for the reverberation-mapping black hole masses, we find a slope {beta} = 3.55 {+-} 0.60 and the intrinsic scatter {sigma}{sub int} = 0.43 {+-} 0.08 dex in the relation log(M {sub BH}/M {sub sun}) = {alpha} + {beta} log({sigma}{sub *}/200 km s{sup -1}), which are consistent with those found for quiescent galaxies. We derive an updated value of the virial coefficient f by finding the value which places the reverberation masses in best agreement with the M {sub BH}-{sigma}{sub *} relation of quiescent galaxies; using the quiescent M {sub BH}-{sigma}{sub *} relation determined by Gueltekin et al., we find log f = 0.72{sup +0.09} {sub -0.10} with an intrinsic scatter of 0.44 {+-} 0.07 dex. No strong correlations between f and parameters connected to the physics of accretion (such as the Eddington ratio or line-shape measurements) are found. The uncertainty of the virial coefficient remains one of the main sources of the uncertainty in black hole mass determinations using reverberation mapping, and therefore also in single-epoch spectroscopic estimates of black hole masses in active galaxies.« less
  • We use collisionless N-body simulations to determine how the growth of a supermassive black hole (SMBH) influences the nuclear kinematics in both barred and unbarred galaxies. In the presence of a bar, the increase in the velocity dispersion σ (within the effective radius) due to the growth of an SMBH is on average ≲ 10%, whereas the increase is only ≲ 4% in an unbarred galaxy. In a barred galaxy, the increase results from a combination of three separate factors: (1) orientation and inclination effects; (2) angular momentum transport by the bar that results in an increase in the centralmore » mass density; and (3) an increase in the vertical and radial velocity anisotropy of stars in the vicinity of the SMBH. In contrast, the growth of the SMBH in an unbarred galaxy causes the velocity distribution in the inner part of the nucleus to become less radially anisotropic. The increase in σ following the growth of the SMBH is insensitive to a variation of a factor of 10 in the final mass of the SMBH, showing that it is the growth process rather than the actual SMBH mass that alters bar evolution in a way that increases σ. We argue that using an axisymmetric stellar dynamical modeling code to measure SMBH masses in barred galaxies could result in a slight overestimate of the derived M {sub BH}, especially if a constant M/L ratio is assumed. We conclude that the growth of a black hole in the presence of a bar could result in an increase in σ that is roughly 4%-8% larger than the increase that occurs in an axisymmetric system. While the increase in σ due to SMBH growth in a barred galaxy might partially account for the claimed offset of barred galaxies and pseudo bulges from the M {sub BH}-σ relation obtained for elliptical galaxies and classical bulges in unbarred galaxies, it is inadequate to account for all of the offset.« less