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Title: The Magnetar Model of the Superluminous Supernova GAIA16apd and the Explosion Jet Feedback Mechanism

Abstract

Under the assumption that jets explode core collapse supernovae (CCSNe) in a negative jet feedback mechanism (JFM), this paper shows that rapidly rotating neutron stars are likely to be formed when the explosion is very energetic. Under the assumption that an accretion disk or an accretion belt around the just-formed neutron star launch jets and that the accreted gas spins-up the just-formed neutron star, I derive a crude relation between the energy that is stored in the spinning neutron star and the explosion energy. This relation is ( E {sub NS-spin}/ E {sub exp}) ≈ E {sub exp}/10{sup 52} erg; It shows that within the frame of the JFM explosion model of CCSNe, spinning neutron stars, such as magnetars, might have significant energy in super-energetic explosions. The existence of magnetars, if confirmed, such as in the recent super-energetic supernova GAIA16apd, further supports the call for a paradigm shift from neutrino-driven to jet-driven CCSN mechanisms.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Department of Physics, Technion—Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22654499
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal Letters; Journal Volume: 839; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; ACCRETION DISKS; EXPLOSIONS; FEEDBACK; GRAVITATIONAL COLLAPSE; LUMINOSITY; NEUTRINOS; NEUTRON STARS; SPIN; SUPERNOVAE

Citation Formats

Soker, Noam, E-mail: soker@physics.technion.ac.il. The Magnetar Model of the Superluminous Supernova GAIA16apd and the Explosion Jet Feedback Mechanism. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.3847/2041-8213/AA6A10.
Soker, Noam, E-mail: soker@physics.technion.ac.il. The Magnetar Model of the Superluminous Supernova GAIA16apd and the Explosion Jet Feedback Mechanism. United States. doi:10.3847/2041-8213/AA6A10.
Soker, Noam, E-mail: soker@physics.technion.ac.il. Mon . "The Magnetar Model of the Superluminous Supernova GAIA16apd and the Explosion Jet Feedback Mechanism". United States. doi:10.3847/2041-8213/AA6A10.
@article{osti_22654499,
title = {The Magnetar Model of the Superluminous Supernova GAIA16apd and the Explosion Jet Feedback Mechanism},
author = {Soker, Noam, E-mail: soker@physics.technion.ac.il},
abstractNote = {Under the assumption that jets explode core collapse supernovae (CCSNe) in a negative jet feedback mechanism (JFM), this paper shows that rapidly rotating neutron stars are likely to be formed when the explosion is very energetic. Under the assumption that an accretion disk or an accretion belt around the just-formed neutron star launch jets and that the accreted gas spins-up the just-formed neutron star, I derive a crude relation between the energy that is stored in the spinning neutron star and the explosion energy. This relation is ( E {sub NS-spin}/ E {sub exp}) ≈ E {sub exp}/10{sup 52} erg; It shows that within the frame of the JFM explosion model of CCSNe, spinning neutron stars, such as magnetars, might have significant energy in super-energetic explosions. The existence of magnetars, if confirmed, such as in the recent super-energetic supernova GAIA16apd, further supports the call for a paradigm shift from neutrino-driven to jet-driven CCSN mechanisms.},
doi = {10.3847/2041-8213/AA6A10},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal Letters},
number = 1,
volume = 839,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Apr 10 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon Apr 10 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
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