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Title: Blowout Surge due to Interaction between a Solar Filament and Coronal Loops

Abstract

We present an observation of the interaction between a filament and the outer spine-like loops that produces a blowout surge within one footpoint of large-scale coronal loops on 2015 February 6. Based the observation of the AIA 304 and 94 Å, the activated filament is initially embedded below a dome of a fan-spine configuration. Due to the ascending motion, the erupting filament reconnects with the outer spine-like field. We note that the material in the filament blows out along the outer spine-like field to form the surge with a wider spire, and a two-ribbon flare appears at the site of the filament eruption. In this process, small bright blobs appear at the interaction region and stream up along the outer spine-like field and down along the eastern fan-like field. As a result, a leg of the filament becomes radial and the material in it erupts, while another leg forms the new closed loops. Our results confirm that the successive reconnection occurring between the erupting filament and the coronal loops may lead to a strong thermal/magnetic pressure imbalance, resulting in a blowout surge.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 396 Yangfangwang, Guandu District, Kunming, 650216 (China)
  2. Department of Physics, School of Science, Sichuan University of Science and Engineering, Zigong 643000 (China)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22654454
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal Letters; Journal Volume: 842; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; CONFIGURATION; FILAMENTS; INTERACTIONS; MAGNETIC FIELDS; SOLAR FLARES; STREAMS; SUN

Citation Formats

Li, Haidong, Jiang, Yunchun, Yang, Jiayan, Yang, Bo, Xu, Zhe, Bi, Yi, Hong, Junchao, Chen, Hechao, and Qu, Zhining, E-mail: lhd@ynao.ac.cn. Blowout Surge due to Interaction between a Solar Filament and Coronal Loops. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.3847/2041-8213/AA762C.
Li, Haidong, Jiang, Yunchun, Yang, Jiayan, Yang, Bo, Xu, Zhe, Bi, Yi, Hong, Junchao, Chen, Hechao, & Qu, Zhining, E-mail: lhd@ynao.ac.cn. Blowout Surge due to Interaction between a Solar Filament and Coronal Loops. United States. doi:10.3847/2041-8213/AA762C.
Li, Haidong, Jiang, Yunchun, Yang, Jiayan, Yang, Bo, Xu, Zhe, Bi, Yi, Hong, Junchao, Chen, Hechao, and Qu, Zhining, E-mail: lhd@ynao.ac.cn. Tue . "Blowout Surge due to Interaction between a Solar Filament and Coronal Loops". United States. doi:10.3847/2041-8213/AA762C.
@article{osti_22654454,
title = {Blowout Surge due to Interaction between a Solar Filament and Coronal Loops},
author = {Li, Haidong and Jiang, Yunchun and Yang, Jiayan and Yang, Bo and Xu, Zhe and Bi, Yi and Hong, Junchao and Chen, Hechao and Qu, Zhining, E-mail: lhd@ynao.ac.cn},
abstractNote = {We present an observation of the interaction between a filament and the outer spine-like loops that produces a blowout surge within one footpoint of large-scale coronal loops on 2015 February 6. Based the observation of the AIA 304 and 94 Å, the activated filament is initially embedded below a dome of a fan-spine configuration. Due to the ascending motion, the erupting filament reconnects with the outer spine-like field. We note that the material in the filament blows out along the outer spine-like field to form the surge with a wider spire, and a two-ribbon flare appears at the site of the filament eruption. In this process, small bright blobs appear at the interaction region and stream up along the outer spine-like field and down along the eastern fan-like field. As a result, a leg of the filament becomes radial and the material in it erupts, while another leg forms the new closed loops. Our results confirm that the successive reconnection occurring between the erupting filament and the coronal loops may lead to a strong thermal/magnetic pressure imbalance, resulting in a blowout surge.},
doi = {10.3847/2041-8213/AA762C},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal Letters},
number = 2,
volume = 842,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Jun 20 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Tue Jun 20 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
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