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Title: Constraining the Age of a Magnetar Possibly Associated with FRB 121102

Abstract

The similarity of the host galaxy of FRB 121102 with those of long gamma-ray bursts and Type I superluminous supernovae suggests that this fast radio burst (FRB) could be associated with a young magnetar. By assuming the FRB emission is produced within the magnetosphere, we derive a lower limit on the age of the magnetar, after which GHz emission is able to escape freely from the dense relativistic wind of the magnetar. Another lower limit is obtained by requiring the dispersion measure contributed by the electron/positron pair wind to be consistent with the observations of the host galaxy. Furthermore, we also derive some upper limits on the magnetar age with discussions on possible energy sources of the FRB emission and the recently discovered persistent radio counterpart. As a result, some constraints on model parameters are addressed by reconciling the lower limits with the possible upper limits that are derived with an assumption of the rotational energy source.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. School of Physics and Electronics Information, Hubei University of Education, Wuhan 430205 (China)
  2. Institute of Astrophysics, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China)
  3. School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22654423
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal Letters; Journal Volume: 839; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; COSMIC GAMMA BURSTS; DISPERSIONS; EMISSION; ENERGY SOURCES; GALAXIES; GAMMA RADIATION; GHZ RANGE; LIMITING VALUES; NEUTRON STARS; POSITRONS; RELATIVISTIC RANGE; SOLAR RADIO BURSTS; SUPERNOVAE

Citation Formats

Cao, Xiao-Feng, Yu, Yun-Wei, and Dai, Zi-Gao, E-mail: yuyw@mail.ccnu.edu.cn. Constraining the Age of a Magnetar Possibly Associated with FRB 121102. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.3847/2041-8213/AA6AF2.
Cao, Xiao-Feng, Yu, Yun-Wei, & Dai, Zi-Gao, E-mail: yuyw@mail.ccnu.edu.cn. Constraining the Age of a Magnetar Possibly Associated with FRB 121102. United States. doi:10.3847/2041-8213/AA6AF2.
Cao, Xiao-Feng, Yu, Yun-Wei, and Dai, Zi-Gao, E-mail: yuyw@mail.ccnu.edu.cn. 2017. "Constraining the Age of a Magnetar Possibly Associated with FRB 121102". United States. doi:10.3847/2041-8213/AA6AF2.
@article{osti_22654423,
title = {Constraining the Age of a Magnetar Possibly Associated with FRB 121102},
author = {Cao, Xiao-Feng and Yu, Yun-Wei and Dai, Zi-Gao, E-mail: yuyw@mail.ccnu.edu.cn},
abstractNote = {The similarity of the host galaxy of FRB 121102 with those of long gamma-ray bursts and Type I superluminous supernovae suggests that this fast radio burst (FRB) could be associated with a young magnetar. By assuming the FRB emission is produced within the magnetosphere, we derive a lower limit on the age of the magnetar, after which GHz emission is able to escape freely from the dense relativistic wind of the magnetar. Another lower limit is obtained by requiring the dispersion measure contributed by the electron/positron pair wind to be consistent with the observations of the host galaxy. Furthermore, we also derive some upper limits on the magnetar age with discussions on possible energy sources of the FRB emission and the recently discovered persistent radio counterpart. As a result, some constraints on model parameters are addressed by reconciling the lower limits with the possible upper limits that are derived with an assumption of the rotational energy source.},
doi = {10.3847/2041-8213/AA6AF2},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal Letters},
number = 2,
volume = 839,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 4
}
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