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Title: High-energy Neutrino Emission from Short Gamma-Ray Bursts: Prospects for Coincident Detection with Gravitational Waves

Abstract

We investigate current and future prospects for coincident detection of high-energy neutrinos and gravitational waves (GWs). Short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs) are believed to originate from mergers of compact star binaries involving neutron stars. We estimate high-energy neutrino fluences from prompt emission, extended emission (EE), X-ray flares, and plateau emission, and we show that neutrino signals associated with the EE are the most promising. Assuming that the cosmic-ray loading factor is ∼10 and the Lorentz factor distribution is lognormal, we calculate the probability of neutrino detection from EE by current and future neutrino detectors, and we find that the quasi-simultaneous detection of high-energy neutrinos, gamma-rays, and GWs is possible with future instruments or even with current instruments for nearby SGRBs having EE. We also discuss stacking analyses that will also be useful with future experiments such as IceCube-Gen2.

Authors:
; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)
  2. Center for Gravitational Physics, Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22654374
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal Letters; Journal Volume: 848; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; COSMIC GAMMA BURSTS; DISTRIBUTION; EMISSION; GAMMA RADIATION; GRAVITATIONAL WAVES; ICECUBE NEUTRINO DETECTOR; NEUTRINO DETECTION; NEUTRINOS; NEUTRON STARS; X RADIATION

Citation Formats

Kimura, Shigeo S., Murase, Kohta, Mészáros, Peter, and Kiuchi, Kenta. High-energy Neutrino Emission from Short Gamma-Ray Bursts: Prospects for Coincident Detection with Gravitational Waves. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.3847/2041-8213/AA8D14.
Kimura, Shigeo S., Murase, Kohta, Mészáros, Peter, & Kiuchi, Kenta. High-energy Neutrino Emission from Short Gamma-Ray Bursts: Prospects for Coincident Detection with Gravitational Waves. United States. doi:10.3847/2041-8213/AA8D14.
Kimura, Shigeo S., Murase, Kohta, Mészáros, Peter, and Kiuchi, Kenta. Tue . "High-energy Neutrino Emission from Short Gamma-Ray Bursts: Prospects for Coincident Detection with Gravitational Waves". United States. doi:10.3847/2041-8213/AA8D14.
@article{osti_22654374,
title = {High-energy Neutrino Emission from Short Gamma-Ray Bursts: Prospects for Coincident Detection with Gravitational Waves},
author = {Kimura, Shigeo S. and Murase, Kohta and Mészáros, Peter and Kiuchi, Kenta},
abstractNote = {We investigate current and future prospects for coincident detection of high-energy neutrinos and gravitational waves (GWs). Short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs) are believed to originate from mergers of compact star binaries involving neutron stars. We estimate high-energy neutrino fluences from prompt emission, extended emission (EE), X-ray flares, and plateau emission, and we show that neutrino signals associated with the EE are the most promising. Assuming that the cosmic-ray loading factor is ∼10 and the Lorentz factor distribution is lognormal, we calculate the probability of neutrino detection from EE by current and future neutrino detectors, and we find that the quasi-simultaneous detection of high-energy neutrinos, gamma-rays, and GWs is possible with future instruments or even with current instruments for nearby SGRBs having EE. We also discuss stacking analyses that will also be useful with future experiments such as IceCube-Gen2.},
doi = {10.3847/2041-8213/AA8D14},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal Letters},
number = 1,
volume = 848,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Oct 10 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Tue Oct 10 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}