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Title: ALMA Shows that Gas Reservoirs of Star-forming Disks over the Past 3 Billion Years Are Not Predominantly Molecular

Abstract

Cold hydrogen gas is the raw fuel for star formation in galaxies, and its partition into atomic and molecular phases is a key quantity for galaxy evolution. In this Letter, we combine Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array and Arecibo single-dish observations to estimate the molecular-to-atomic hydrogen mass ratio for massive star-forming galaxies at z ∼ 0.2 extracted from the HIGHz survey, i.e., some of the most massive gas-rich systems currently known. We show that the balance between atomic and molecular hydrogen in these galaxies is similar to that of local main-sequence disks, implying that atomic hydrogen has been dominating the cold gas mass budget of star-forming galaxies for at least the past three billion years. In addition, despite harboring gas reservoirs that are more typical of objects at the cosmic noon, HIGHz galaxies host regular rotating disks with low gas velocity dispersions suggesting that high total gas fractions do not necessarily drive high turbulence in the interstellar medium.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22654372
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal Letters; Journal Volume: 848; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; DISPERSIONS; EVOLUTION; GALAXIES; HYDROGEN; MASS; PARTITION; STAR EVOLUTION; STARS; TURBULENCE; VELOCITY

Citation Formats

Cortese, Luca, Catinella, Barbara, and Janowiecki, Steven, E-mail: luca.cortese@uwa.edu.au. ALMA Shows that Gas Reservoirs of Star-forming Disks over the Past 3 Billion Years Are Not Predominantly Molecular. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.3847/2041-8213/AA8CC3.
Cortese, Luca, Catinella, Barbara, & Janowiecki, Steven, E-mail: luca.cortese@uwa.edu.au. ALMA Shows that Gas Reservoirs of Star-forming Disks over the Past 3 Billion Years Are Not Predominantly Molecular. United States. doi:10.3847/2041-8213/AA8CC3.
Cortese, Luca, Catinella, Barbara, and Janowiecki, Steven, E-mail: luca.cortese@uwa.edu.au. 2017. "ALMA Shows that Gas Reservoirs of Star-forming Disks over the Past 3 Billion Years Are Not Predominantly Molecular". United States. doi:10.3847/2041-8213/AA8CC3.
@article{osti_22654372,
title = {ALMA Shows that Gas Reservoirs of Star-forming Disks over the Past 3 Billion Years Are Not Predominantly Molecular},
author = {Cortese, Luca and Catinella, Barbara and Janowiecki, Steven, E-mail: luca.cortese@uwa.edu.au},
abstractNote = {Cold hydrogen gas is the raw fuel for star formation in galaxies, and its partition into atomic and molecular phases is a key quantity for galaxy evolution. In this Letter, we combine Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array and Arecibo single-dish observations to estimate the molecular-to-atomic hydrogen mass ratio for massive star-forming galaxies at z ∼ 0.2 extracted from the HIGHz survey, i.e., some of the most massive gas-rich systems currently known. We show that the balance between atomic and molecular hydrogen in these galaxies is similar to that of local main-sequence disks, implying that atomic hydrogen has been dominating the cold gas mass budget of star-forming galaxies for at least the past three billion years. In addition, despite harboring gas reservoirs that are more typical of objects at the cosmic noon, HIGHz galaxies host regular rotating disks with low gas velocity dispersions suggesting that high total gas fractions do not necessarily drive high turbulence in the interstellar medium.},
doi = {10.3847/2041-8213/AA8CC3},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal Letters},
number = 1,
volume = 848,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month =
}
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