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Title: Simultaneous Observations of p-mode Light Walls and Magnetic Reconnection Ejections above Sunspot Light Bridges

Abstract

Recent high-resolution observations from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph reveal bright wall-shaped structures in active regions (ARs), especially above sunspot light bridges. Their most prominent feature is the bright oscillating front in the 1400/1330 Å channel. These structures are named light walls and are often interpreted to be driven by p-mode waves. Above the light bridge of AR 12222 on 2014 December 06, we observed intermittent ejections superimposed on an oscillating light wall in the 1400 Å passband. At the base location of each ejection, the emission enhancement was detected in the Solar Dynamics Observatory 1600 Å channel. Thus, we suggest that in wall bases (light bridges), in addition to the leaked p-mode waves consistently driving the oscillating light wall, magnetic reconnection could happen intermittently at some locations and eject the heated plasma upward. Similarly, in the second event occurring in AR 12371 on 2015 June 16, a jet was simultaneously detected in addition to the light wall with a wave-shaped bright front above the light bridge. At the footpoint of this jet, lasting brightening was observed, implying magnetic reconnection at the base. We propose that in these events, two mechanisms, p-mode waves and magnetic reconnection, simultaneously play roles inmore » the light bridge, and lead to the distinct kinetic features of the light walls and the ejection-like activities, respectively. To illustrate the two mechanisms and their resulting activities above light bridges, in this study we present a cartoon model.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22654369
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal Letters; Journal Volume: 848; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; ATMOSPHERES; EMISSION; INTERFACES; MAGNETIC RECONNECTION; OSCILLATIONS; PLASMA; RESOLUTION; SUN; SUNSPOTS; ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION; VISIBLE RADIATION

Citation Formats

Hou, Yijun, Zhang, Jun, Li, Ting, Yang, Shuhong, and Li, Xiaohong, E-mail: yijunhou@nao.cas.cn, E-mail: zjun@nao.cas.cn. Simultaneous Observations of p-mode Light Walls and Magnetic Reconnection Ejections above Sunspot Light Bridges. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.3847/2041-8213/AA8EDD.
Hou, Yijun, Zhang, Jun, Li, Ting, Yang, Shuhong, & Li, Xiaohong, E-mail: yijunhou@nao.cas.cn, E-mail: zjun@nao.cas.cn. Simultaneous Observations of p-mode Light Walls and Magnetic Reconnection Ejections above Sunspot Light Bridges. United States. doi:10.3847/2041-8213/AA8EDD.
Hou, Yijun, Zhang, Jun, Li, Ting, Yang, Shuhong, and Li, Xiaohong, E-mail: yijunhou@nao.cas.cn, E-mail: zjun@nao.cas.cn. 2017. "Simultaneous Observations of p-mode Light Walls and Magnetic Reconnection Ejections above Sunspot Light Bridges". United States. doi:10.3847/2041-8213/AA8EDD.
@article{osti_22654369,
title = {Simultaneous Observations of p-mode Light Walls and Magnetic Reconnection Ejections above Sunspot Light Bridges},
author = {Hou, Yijun and Zhang, Jun and Li, Ting and Yang, Shuhong and Li, Xiaohong, E-mail: yijunhou@nao.cas.cn, E-mail: zjun@nao.cas.cn},
abstractNote = {Recent high-resolution observations from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph reveal bright wall-shaped structures in active regions (ARs), especially above sunspot light bridges. Their most prominent feature is the bright oscillating front in the 1400/1330 Å channel. These structures are named light walls and are often interpreted to be driven by p-mode waves. Above the light bridge of AR 12222 on 2014 December 06, we observed intermittent ejections superimposed on an oscillating light wall in the 1400 Å passband. At the base location of each ejection, the emission enhancement was detected in the Solar Dynamics Observatory 1600 Å channel. Thus, we suggest that in wall bases (light bridges), in addition to the leaked p-mode waves consistently driving the oscillating light wall, magnetic reconnection could happen intermittently at some locations and eject the heated plasma upward. Similarly, in the second event occurring in AR 12371 on 2015 June 16, a jet was simultaneously detected in addition to the light wall with a wave-shaped bright front above the light bridge. At the footpoint of this jet, lasting brightening was observed, implying magnetic reconnection at the base. We propose that in these events, two mechanisms, p-mode waves and magnetic reconnection, simultaneously play roles in the light bridge, and lead to the distinct kinetic features of the light walls and the ejection-like activities, respectively. To illustrate the two mechanisms and their resulting activities above light bridges, in this study we present a cartoon model.},
doi = {10.3847/2041-8213/AA8EDD},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal Letters},
number = 1,
volume = 848,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month =
}
  • High-resolution observations of the solar chromosphere and transition region often reveal surge-like oscillatory activities above sunspot light bridges (LBs). These oscillations are often interpreted as intermittent plasma jets produced by quasi-periodic magnetic reconnection. We have analyzed the oscillations above an LB in a sunspot using data taken by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph . The chromospheric 2796 Å images show surge-like activities above the entire LB at any time, forming an oscillating wall. Within the wall we often see that the core of the Mg ii k 2796.35 Å line first experiences a large blueshift, and then gradually decreases tomore » zero shift before increasing to a redshift of comparable magnitude. Such a behavior suggests that the oscillations are highly nonlinear and likely related to shocks. In the 1400 Å passband, which samples emission mainly from the Si iv ion, the most prominent feature is a bright oscillatory front ahead of the surges. We find a positive correlation between the acceleration and maximum velocity of the moving front, which is consistent with numerical simulations of upward propagating slow-mode shock waves. The Si iv 1402.77 Å line profile is generally enhanced and broadened in the bright front, which might be caused by turbulence generated through compression or by the shocks. These results, together with the fact that the oscillation period stays almost unchanged over a long duration, lead us to propose that the surge-like oscillations above LBs are caused by shocked p-mode waves leaked from the underlying photosphere.« less
  • We present high-resolution magnetic field measurements of a sunspot light bridge (LB) that produced chromospheric plasma ejections intermittently and recurrently for more than 1 day. The observations were carried out with the Hinode Solar Optical Telescope on 2007 April 29 and 30. The spectro-polarimeter reveals obliquely oriented magnetic fields with vertical electric current density higher than 100 mA m{sup -2} along the LB. The observations suggest that current-carrying highly twisted magnetic flux tubes are trapped below a cusp-shaped magnetic structure along the LB. The presence of trapped current-carrying flux tubes is essential for causing long-lasting chromospheric plasma ejections at themore » interface with pre-existing vertically oriented umbral fields. A bidirectional jet was clearly detected, suggesting magnetic reconnections occurring at very low altitudes, slightly above the height where the vector magnetic fields are measured. Moreover, we found another strong vertical electric current on the interface between the current-carrying flux tube and pre-existing umbral field, which might be a direct detection of the currents flowing in the current sheet formed at the magnetic reconnection sites.« less
  • We use high spatial and spectral resolution observations obtained with the CRisp Imaging SpectroPolarimeter at the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope to analyze the velocity profile of granular light bridges (LBs) in a sunspot. We find upflows associated with the central dark lanes of the LBs. From bisectors in the Fe I 630.15 nm line we find that the magnitude of the upflows varies with height, with the strongest upflows being deeper in the atmosphere. Typical upflow velocities measured from the 70% bisector are around 500 m s{sup -1} with peaks above 1 km s{sup -1}. The upflows in themore » central dark lane are surrounded by downflows of weaker magnitude, sometimes concentrated in patches with enhanced velocities reaching up to 1.1 km s{sup -1}. A small spatial offset between the upflows and the continuum dark lane is interpreted as a line-of-sight effect due to the elevated nature of the dark lane and the LB above the umbral surroundings. Our observations show that the central dark lane in granular LBs is not equivalent to the intergranular lanes of normal photospheric granulation that host convective downflows. These results support recent MHD simulations of magneto-convection in sunspot atmospheres.« less
  • The Solar Optical Telescope on board Hinode observed a sunspot (AR 11836) with two light bridges (LBs) on 2013 August 31. We analyzed a two-hour Ca II H emission intensity data set and detected strong five-minute oscillation power on both LBs and in the inner penumbra. The time-distance plot reveals that the five-minute oscillation phase does not vary significantly along the thin bridge, indicating that the oscillations are likely to originate from underneath it. The slit taken along the central axis of the wide LB exhibits a standing wave feature. However, at the center of the wide bridge, the five-minutemore » oscillation power is found to be stronger than at its sides. Moreover, the time-distance plot across the wide bridge exhibits a herringbone pattern that indicates a counter-stream of two running waves, which originated at the bridge's sides. Thus, the five-minute oscillations on the wide bridge also resemble the properties of running penumbral waves. The five-minute oscillations are suppressed in the umbra, while the three-minute oscillations occupy all three cores of the sunspot's umbra, separated by the LBs. The three-minute oscillations were found to be in phase at both sides of the LBs. This may indicate that either LBs do not affect umbral oscillations, or that umbral oscillations at different umbral cores share the same source. It also indicates that LBs are rather shallow objects situated in the upper part of the umbra. We found that umbral flashes (UFs) follow the life cycles of umbral oscillations with much larger amplitudes. They cannot propagate across LBs. UFs dominate the three-minute oscillation power within each core; however, they do not disrupt the phase of umbral oscillation.« less
  • The observations of chromospheric oscillations of two umbral light bridges (LBs) within a sunspot from NOAA Active Region 12127 are presented. It was found that the running umbral waves with periods of 2.2–2.6 minutes underwent very fast damping before approaching umbral boundaries, while those with higher periods (>2.6 minutes) could propagate outside umbrae. On two sides of each LB adjacent to umbrae, the cross-wavelet spectra displayed that the oscillations on them had a common significant power region with dominant frequencies of 2–6 minutes and phase differences of ∼90°. A counterstream of two running umbral waves in the 2–6 minute frequencymore » range propagated toward the LBs, where they encountered each other and gave rise to constructive or even destructive interference on the LBs. In addition, the velocity and density perturbations on the LBs were found in opposite phases suggesting that the perturbations were caused by the downward propagating waves.« less