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Title: Dust-trapping Vortices and a Potentially Planet-triggered Spiral Wake in the Pre-transitional Disk of V1247 Orionis

Abstract

The radial drift problem constitutes one of the most fundamental problems in planet formation theory, as it predicts particles to drift into the star before they are able to grow to planetesimal size. Dust-trapping vortices have been proposed as a possible solution to this problem, as they might be able to trap particles over millions of years, allowing them to grow beyond the radial drift barrier. Here, we present ALMA 0.″04 resolution imaging of the pre-transitional disk of V1247 Orionis that reveals an asymmetric ring as well as a sharply confined crescent structure, resembling morphologies seen in theoretical models of vortex formation. The asymmetric ring (at 0.″17 = 54 au separation from the star) and the crescent (at 0.″38 = 120 au) seem smoothly connected through a one-armed spiral-arm structure that has been found previously in scattered light. We propose a physical scenario with a planet orbiting at ∼0.″3 ≈ 100 au, where the one-armed spiral arm detected in polarized light traces the accretion stream feeding the protoplanet. The dynamical influence of the planet clears the gap between the ring and the crescent and triggers two vortices that trap millimeter-sized particles, namely, the crescent and the bright asymmetry seen inmore » the ring. We conducted dedicated hydrodynamics simulations of a disk with an embedded planet, which results in similar spiral-arm morphologies as seen in our scattered-light images. At the position of the spiral wake and the crescent we also observe {sup 12}CO(3-2) and H{sup 12}CO{sup +} (4-3) excess line emission, likely tracing the increased scale-height in these disk regions.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;  [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [6];  [7]
  1. University of Exeter, School of Physics, Astrophysics Group, Stocker Road, Exeter EX4 4QL (United Kingdom)
  2. Division of Particle and Astrophysical Science, Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University, Nagoya (Japan)
  3. Division of Liberal Arts, Kogakuin University, 1-24-2 Nishi-Shinjuku, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 163-8677 (Japan)
  4. Department of Physics, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221 (United States)
  5. Eureka Scientific, 2452 Delmer Street, Suite 100, Oakland, CA 96402 (United States)
  6. Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 311 West Hall, 1085 South University Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)
  7. Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73071 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22654368
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal Letters; Journal Volume: 848; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; ACCRETION DISKS; ASYMMETRY; AUGER ELECTRON SPECTROSCOPY; DIFFUSION BARRIERS; DUSTS; EMISSION; HYDRODYNAMICS; PLANETS; PROTOPLANETS; RESOLUTION; RINGS; SATELLITES; SIMULATION; STARS; STREAMS; VISIBLE RADIATION; VORTICES

Citation Formats

Kraus, Stefan, Kreplin, Alexander, Young, Alison K., Bate, Matthew R., Harries, Tim T., Willson, Matthew, Fukugawa, Misato, Muto, Takayuki, Sitko, Michael L., Grady, Carol, Monnier, John D., and Wisniewski, John, E-mail: skraus@astro.ex.ac.uk. Dust-trapping Vortices and a Potentially Planet-triggered Spiral Wake in the Pre-transitional Disk of V1247 Orionis. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.3847/2041-8213/AA8EDC.
Kraus, Stefan, Kreplin, Alexander, Young, Alison K., Bate, Matthew R., Harries, Tim T., Willson, Matthew, Fukugawa, Misato, Muto, Takayuki, Sitko, Michael L., Grady, Carol, Monnier, John D., & Wisniewski, John, E-mail: skraus@astro.ex.ac.uk. Dust-trapping Vortices and a Potentially Planet-triggered Spiral Wake in the Pre-transitional Disk of V1247 Orionis. United States. doi:10.3847/2041-8213/AA8EDC.
Kraus, Stefan, Kreplin, Alexander, Young, Alison K., Bate, Matthew R., Harries, Tim T., Willson, Matthew, Fukugawa, Misato, Muto, Takayuki, Sitko, Michael L., Grady, Carol, Monnier, John D., and Wisniewski, John, E-mail: skraus@astro.ex.ac.uk. Tue . "Dust-trapping Vortices and a Potentially Planet-triggered Spiral Wake in the Pre-transitional Disk of V1247 Orionis". United States. doi:10.3847/2041-8213/AA8EDC.
@article{osti_22654368,
title = {Dust-trapping Vortices and a Potentially Planet-triggered Spiral Wake in the Pre-transitional Disk of V1247 Orionis},
author = {Kraus, Stefan and Kreplin, Alexander and Young, Alison K. and Bate, Matthew R. and Harries, Tim T. and Willson, Matthew and Fukugawa, Misato and Muto, Takayuki and Sitko, Michael L. and Grady, Carol and Monnier, John D. and Wisniewski, John, E-mail: skraus@astro.ex.ac.uk},
abstractNote = {The radial drift problem constitutes one of the most fundamental problems in planet formation theory, as it predicts particles to drift into the star before they are able to grow to planetesimal size. Dust-trapping vortices have been proposed as a possible solution to this problem, as they might be able to trap particles over millions of years, allowing them to grow beyond the radial drift barrier. Here, we present ALMA 0.″04 resolution imaging of the pre-transitional disk of V1247 Orionis that reveals an asymmetric ring as well as a sharply confined crescent structure, resembling morphologies seen in theoretical models of vortex formation. The asymmetric ring (at 0.″17 = 54 au separation from the star) and the crescent (at 0.″38 = 120 au) seem smoothly connected through a one-armed spiral-arm structure that has been found previously in scattered light. We propose a physical scenario with a planet orbiting at ∼0.″3 ≈ 100 au, where the one-armed spiral arm detected in polarized light traces the accretion stream feeding the protoplanet. The dynamical influence of the planet clears the gap between the ring and the crescent and triggers two vortices that trap millimeter-sized particles, namely, the crescent and the bright asymmetry seen in the ring. We conducted dedicated hydrodynamics simulations of a disk with an embedded planet, which results in similar spiral-arm morphologies as seen in our scattered-light images. At the position of the spiral wake and the crescent we also observe {sup 12}CO(3-2) and H{sup 12}CO{sup +} (4-3) excess line emission, likely tracing the increased scale-height in these disk regions.},
doi = {10.3847/2041-8213/AA8EDC},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal Letters},
number = 1,
volume = 848,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Oct 10 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Tue Oct 10 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}