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Title: A DWARF TRANSITIONAL PROTOPLANETARY DISK AROUND XZ TAU B

Abstract

We report the discovery of a dwarf protoplanetary disk around the star XZ Tau B that shows all the features of a classical transitional disk but on a much smaller scale. The disk has been imaged with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), revealing that its dust emission has a quite small radius of ∼3.4 au and presents a central cavity of ∼1.3 au in radius that we attribute to clearing by a compact system of orbiting (proto)planets. Given the very small radii involved, evolution is expected to be much faster in this disk (observable changes in a few months) than in classical disks (observable changes requiring decades) and easy to monitor with observations in the near future. From our modeling we estimate that the mass of the disk is large enough to form a compact planetary system.

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]; ; ; ;  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [6]
  1. Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC), Glorieta de la Astronomía s/n, E-18008 Granada (Spain)
  2. Instituto de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica UNAM, Apartado Postal 3-72 (Xangari), 58089 Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico)
  3. Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 825 Dennison Building, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)
  4. Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Guanajuato, Guanajuato, Gto 36240 (Mexico)
  5. Institut de Ciències de l’Espai (CSIC)-Institut de Ciències del Cosmos (UB)/IEEC, Martí i Franquès 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain)
  6. Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22654290
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal Letters; Journal Volume: 825; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; DUSTS; DWARF STARS; EMISSION; EVOLUTION; IMAGES; INTERACTIONS; MASS; MONITORS; PLANETS; PROTOPLANETS; SIMULATION; STARS

Citation Formats

Osorio, Mayra, Macías, Enrique, Anglada, Guillem, Gómez, José F., Carrasco-González, Carlos, Galván-Madrid, Roberto, Zapata, Luis, Rodríguez, Luis F., Calvet, Nuria, Nagel, Erick, Torrelles, José M., and Zhu, Zhaohuan, E-mail: osorio@iaa.es. A DWARF TRANSITIONAL PROTOPLANETARY DISK AROUND XZ TAU B. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.3847/2041-8205/825/1/L10.
Osorio, Mayra, Macías, Enrique, Anglada, Guillem, Gómez, José F., Carrasco-González, Carlos, Galván-Madrid, Roberto, Zapata, Luis, Rodríguez, Luis F., Calvet, Nuria, Nagel, Erick, Torrelles, José M., & Zhu, Zhaohuan, E-mail: osorio@iaa.es. A DWARF TRANSITIONAL PROTOPLANETARY DISK AROUND XZ TAU B. United States. doi:10.3847/2041-8205/825/1/L10.
Osorio, Mayra, Macías, Enrique, Anglada, Guillem, Gómez, José F., Carrasco-González, Carlos, Galván-Madrid, Roberto, Zapata, Luis, Rodríguez, Luis F., Calvet, Nuria, Nagel, Erick, Torrelles, José M., and Zhu, Zhaohuan, E-mail: osorio@iaa.es. 2016. "A DWARF TRANSITIONAL PROTOPLANETARY DISK AROUND XZ TAU B". United States. doi:10.3847/2041-8205/825/1/L10.
@article{osti_22654290,
title = {A DWARF TRANSITIONAL PROTOPLANETARY DISK AROUND XZ TAU B},
author = {Osorio, Mayra and Macías, Enrique and Anglada, Guillem and Gómez, José F. and Carrasco-González, Carlos and Galván-Madrid, Roberto and Zapata, Luis and Rodríguez, Luis F. and Calvet, Nuria and Nagel, Erick and Torrelles, José M. and Zhu, Zhaohuan, E-mail: osorio@iaa.es},
abstractNote = {We report the discovery of a dwarf protoplanetary disk around the star XZ Tau B that shows all the features of a classical transitional disk but on a much smaller scale. The disk has been imaged with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), revealing that its dust emission has a quite small radius of ∼3.4 au and presents a central cavity of ∼1.3 au in radius that we attribute to clearing by a compact system of orbiting (proto)planets. Given the very small radii involved, evolution is expected to be much faster in this disk (observable changes in a few months) than in classical disks (observable changes requiring decades) and easy to monitor with observations in the near future. From our modeling we estimate that the mass of the disk is large enough to form a compact planetary system.},
doi = {10.3847/2041-8205/825/1/L10},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal Letters},
number = 1,
volume = 825,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}
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