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Title: GRAVITATIONAL-WAVE CONSTRAINTS ON THE PROGENITORS OF FAST RADIO BURSTS

Abstract

The nature of fast radio bursts (FRBs) remains enigmatic. Highly energetic radio pulses of millisecond duration, FRBs are observed with dispersion measures consistent with an extragalactic source. A variety of models have been proposed to explain their origin. One popular class of theorized FRB progenitor is the coalescence of compact binaries composed of neutron stars and/or black holes. Such coalescence events are strong gravitational-wave emitters. We demonstrate that measurements made by the LIGO and Virgo gravitational-wave observatories can be leveraged to severely constrain the validity of FRB binary coalescence models. Existing measurements constrain the binary black hole rate to approximately 5% of the FRB rate, and results from Advanced LIGO’s O1 and O2 observing runs may place similarly strong constraints on the fraction of FRBs due to binary neutron star and neutron star–black hole progenitors.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. LIGO Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22654282
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal Letters; Journal Volume: 825; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; APPROXIMATIONS; BLACK HOLES; COALESCENCE; DISPERSIONS; GRAVITATIONAL WAVES; LIMITING VALUES; NEUTRON STARS; PULSES; SOLAR RADIO BURSTS

Citation Formats

Callister, Thomas, Kanner, Jonah, and Weinstein, Alan, E-mail: tcallist@caltech.edu. GRAVITATIONAL-WAVE CONSTRAINTS ON THE PROGENITORS OF FAST RADIO BURSTS. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.3847/2041-8205/825/1/L12.
Callister, Thomas, Kanner, Jonah, & Weinstein, Alan, E-mail: tcallist@caltech.edu. GRAVITATIONAL-WAVE CONSTRAINTS ON THE PROGENITORS OF FAST RADIO BURSTS. United States. doi:10.3847/2041-8205/825/1/L12.
Callister, Thomas, Kanner, Jonah, and Weinstein, Alan, E-mail: tcallist@caltech.edu. 2016. "GRAVITATIONAL-WAVE CONSTRAINTS ON THE PROGENITORS OF FAST RADIO BURSTS". United States. doi:10.3847/2041-8205/825/1/L12.
@article{osti_22654282,
title = {GRAVITATIONAL-WAVE CONSTRAINTS ON THE PROGENITORS OF FAST RADIO BURSTS},
author = {Callister, Thomas and Kanner, Jonah and Weinstein, Alan, E-mail: tcallist@caltech.edu},
abstractNote = {The nature of fast radio bursts (FRBs) remains enigmatic. Highly energetic radio pulses of millisecond duration, FRBs are observed with dispersion measures consistent with an extragalactic source. A variety of models have been proposed to explain their origin. One popular class of theorized FRB progenitor is the coalescence of compact binaries composed of neutron stars and/or black holes. Such coalescence events are strong gravitational-wave emitters. We demonstrate that measurements made by the LIGO and Virgo gravitational-wave observatories can be leveraged to severely constrain the validity of FRB binary coalescence models. Existing measurements constrain the binary black hole rate to approximately 5% of the FRB rate, and results from Advanced LIGO’s O1 and O2 observing runs may place similarly strong constraints on the fraction of FRBs due to binary neutron star and neutron star–black hole progenitors.},
doi = {10.3847/2041-8205/825/1/L12},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal Letters},
number = 1,
volume = 825,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}
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