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Title: THE FIRST SPECTRUM OF THE COLDEST BROWN DWARF

Abstract

The recently discovered brown dwarf WISE 0855 presents the first opportunity to directly study an object outside the solar system that is nearly as cold as our own gas giant planets. However, the traditional methodology for characterizing brown dwarfs—near-infrared spectroscopy—is not currently feasible, as WISE 0855 is too cold and faint. To characterize this frozen extrasolar world we obtained a 4.5–5.2 μ m spectrum, the same bandpass long used to study Jupiter’s deep thermal emission. Our spectrum reveals the presence of atmospheric water vapor and clouds, with an absorption profile that is strikingly similar to Jupiter’s. The spectrum quality is high enough to allow for the investigation of dynamical and chemical processes that have long been studied in Jupiter’s atmosphere, but now on an extrasolar world.

Authors:
; ;  [1];  [2];  [3]; ;  [4];  [5];  [6]
  1. University of California, Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)
  2. Bucknell University, 701 Moore Avenue, Lewisburg, PA 17837 (United States)
  3. Gemini Observatory, 670 North A’ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States)
  4. NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)
  5. Carnegie Institute for Science, Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, 5241 Broad Branch Road, NW, Washington, DC 20015 (United States)
  6. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22654265
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal Letters; Journal Volume: 826; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; ABSORPTION; ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY; ATMOSPHERES; DWARF STARS; EARTH PLANET; EMISSION; GLOBAL ASPECTS; INFRARED SPECTRA; JUPITER PLANET; SOLAR SYSTEM; WATER; WATER VAPOR

Citation Formats

Skemer, Andrew J., Morley, Caroline V., Fortney, Jonathan J., Allers, Katelyn N., Geballe, Thomas R., Marley, Mark S., Lupu, Roxana, Faherty, Jacqueline K., and Bjoraker, Gordon L.. THE FIRST SPECTRUM OF THE COLDEST BROWN DWARF. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.3847/2041-8205/826/2/L17.
Skemer, Andrew J., Morley, Caroline V., Fortney, Jonathan J., Allers, Katelyn N., Geballe, Thomas R., Marley, Mark S., Lupu, Roxana, Faherty, Jacqueline K., & Bjoraker, Gordon L.. THE FIRST SPECTRUM OF THE COLDEST BROWN DWARF. United States. doi:10.3847/2041-8205/826/2/L17.
Skemer, Andrew J., Morley, Caroline V., Fortney, Jonathan J., Allers, Katelyn N., Geballe, Thomas R., Marley, Mark S., Lupu, Roxana, Faherty, Jacqueline K., and Bjoraker, Gordon L.. Mon . "THE FIRST SPECTRUM OF THE COLDEST BROWN DWARF". United States. doi:10.3847/2041-8205/826/2/L17.
@article{osti_22654265,
title = {THE FIRST SPECTRUM OF THE COLDEST BROWN DWARF},
author = {Skemer, Andrew J. and Morley, Caroline V. and Fortney, Jonathan J. and Allers, Katelyn N. and Geballe, Thomas R. and Marley, Mark S. and Lupu, Roxana and Faherty, Jacqueline K. and Bjoraker, Gordon L.},
abstractNote = {The recently discovered brown dwarf WISE 0855 presents the first opportunity to directly study an object outside the solar system that is nearly as cold as our own gas giant planets. However, the traditional methodology for characterizing brown dwarfs—near-infrared spectroscopy—is not currently feasible, as WISE 0855 is too cold and faint. To characterize this frozen extrasolar world we obtained a 4.5–5.2 μ m spectrum, the same bandpass long used to study Jupiter’s deep thermal emission. Our spectrum reveals the presence of atmospheric water vapor and clouds, with an absorption profile that is strikingly similar to Jupiter’s. The spectrum quality is high enough to allow for the investigation of dynamical and chemical processes that have long been studied in Jupiter’s atmosphere, but now on an extrasolar world.},
doi = {10.3847/2041-8205/826/2/L17},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal Letters},
number = 2,
volume = 826,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Mon Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}