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Title: WE-AB-206-01: Diagnostic Ultrasound Imaging Quality Assurance

Abstract

The involvement of medical physicists in diagnostic ultrasound imaging service is increasing due to QC and accreditation requirements. The goal of this ultrasound hands-on workshop is to demonstrate quality control (QC) testing in diagnostic ultrasound and to provide updates in ACR ultrasound accreditation requirements. The first half of this workshop will include two presentations reviewing diagnostic ultrasound QA/QC and ACR ultrasound accreditation requirements. The second half of the workshop will include live demonstrations of basic QC tests. An array of ultrasound testing phantoms and ultrasound scanners will be available for attendees to learn diagnostic ultrasound QC in a hands-on environment with live demonstrations and on-site instructors. The targeted attendees are medical physicists in diagnostic imaging. Learning Objectives: Gain familiarity with common elements of a QA/QC program for diagnostic ultrasound imaging dentify QC tools available for testing diagnostic ultrasound systems and learn how to use these tools Learn ACR ultrasound accreditation requirements Jennifer Walter is an employee of American College of Radiology on Ultrasound Accreditation.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. University of Wisconsin (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22654128
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES; LEARNING; QUALITY ASSURANCE; QUALITY CONTROL; TESTING

Citation Formats

Zagzebski, J. WE-AB-206-01: Diagnostic Ultrasound Imaging Quality Assurance. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4957767.
Zagzebski, J. WE-AB-206-01: Diagnostic Ultrasound Imaging Quality Assurance. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957767.
Zagzebski, J. 2016. "WE-AB-206-01: Diagnostic Ultrasound Imaging Quality Assurance". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957767.
@article{osti_22654128,
title = {WE-AB-206-01: Diagnostic Ultrasound Imaging Quality Assurance},
author = {Zagzebski, J.},
abstractNote = {The involvement of medical physicists in diagnostic ultrasound imaging service is increasing due to QC and accreditation requirements. The goal of this ultrasound hands-on workshop is to demonstrate quality control (QC) testing in diagnostic ultrasound and to provide updates in ACR ultrasound accreditation requirements. The first half of this workshop will include two presentations reviewing diagnostic ultrasound QA/QC and ACR ultrasound accreditation requirements. The second half of the workshop will include live demonstrations of basic QC tests. An array of ultrasound testing phantoms and ultrasound scanners will be available for attendees to learn diagnostic ultrasound QC in a hands-on environment with live demonstrations and on-site instructors. The targeted attendees are medical physicists in diagnostic imaging. Learning Objectives: Gain familiarity with common elements of a QA/QC program for diagnostic ultrasound imaging dentify QC tools available for testing diagnostic ultrasound systems and learn how to use these tools Learn ACR ultrasound accreditation requirements Jennifer Walter is an employee of American College of Radiology on Ultrasound Accreditation.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4957767},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
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