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Title: WE-AB-207A-10: Transmission Characteristics of a Two Dimensional Antiscatter Grid Prototype for CBCT

Abstract

Purpose: Scattered radiation remains to be a major contributor to image quality degradation in CBCT. To address the scatter problem, a focused, 2D antiscatter grid (2DASG) prototype was designed, and fabricated using additive manufacturing processes. Its scatter and primary transmission properties were characterized using a linac mounted CBCT system. Methods: The prototype 2DASG was composed of rectangular grid holes separated by tungsten septa, and has a grid pitch of 2.91 mm, grid ratio of 8, and a septal thickness of 0.1 mm. Each grid hole was aligned or focused towards the x-ray source in half-fan (i.e. offset detector) geometry of the Varian TrueBeam CBCT system. Scatter and primary transmission experiments were performed by using acrylic blocks and the beam-stop method. Transmission properties of a radiographic ASG (1DASG) (grid ratio of 10) was also performed by using the identical setup. Results: At 30 cm phantom thickness, scatter to primary ratio (SPR) was 4.51 without any ASG device. SPR was reduced to 1.28 with 1DASG, and it was further reduced to 0.28 with 2DASG. Scatter transmission fraction (Ts) of 1DASG was 21%, and Ts was reduced to 5.8% with 2DASG. The average primary transmission fraction (Tp) of 1DASG was 70.6%, whereas Tpmore » increased to 85.1% with 2DASG. Variation of Tp across 40 cm length (the long axis of flat panel detector) was 2.6%. Conclusion: When compared to conventional ASGs, the focused 2DASG can vastly improve scatter suppression and primary transmission performance. Due to precise alignment of 2DASG’s grid holes with respect to beam divergence, high degree of primary transmission through the 2DASG was maintained across the full length of the prototype. We strongly believe that robust scatter rejection and primary transmission characteristics of our 2DASG can translate into both improved quantitative accuracy and soft tissue resolution in linac mounted CBCT systems.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22654124
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; GRIDS; IMAGE PROCESSING; LINEAR ACCELERATORS; PERFORMANCE; TRANSMISSION; X RADIATION; X-RAY SOURCES

Citation Formats

Altunbas, C, Kavanagh, B, and Miften, M. WE-AB-207A-10: Transmission Characteristics of a Two Dimensional Antiscatter Grid Prototype for CBCT. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4957763.
Altunbas, C, Kavanagh, B, & Miften, M. WE-AB-207A-10: Transmission Characteristics of a Two Dimensional Antiscatter Grid Prototype for CBCT. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957763.
Altunbas, C, Kavanagh, B, and Miften, M. 2016. "WE-AB-207A-10: Transmission Characteristics of a Two Dimensional Antiscatter Grid Prototype for CBCT". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957763.
@article{osti_22654124,
title = {WE-AB-207A-10: Transmission Characteristics of a Two Dimensional Antiscatter Grid Prototype for CBCT},
author = {Altunbas, C and Kavanagh, B and Miften, M},
abstractNote = {Purpose: Scattered radiation remains to be a major contributor to image quality degradation in CBCT. To address the scatter problem, a focused, 2D antiscatter grid (2DASG) prototype was designed, and fabricated using additive manufacturing processes. Its scatter and primary transmission properties were characterized using a linac mounted CBCT system. Methods: The prototype 2DASG was composed of rectangular grid holes separated by tungsten septa, and has a grid pitch of 2.91 mm, grid ratio of 8, and a septal thickness of 0.1 mm. Each grid hole was aligned or focused towards the x-ray source in half-fan (i.e. offset detector) geometry of the Varian TrueBeam CBCT system. Scatter and primary transmission experiments were performed by using acrylic blocks and the beam-stop method. Transmission properties of a radiographic ASG (1DASG) (grid ratio of 10) was also performed by using the identical setup. Results: At 30 cm phantom thickness, scatter to primary ratio (SPR) was 4.51 without any ASG device. SPR was reduced to 1.28 with 1DASG, and it was further reduced to 0.28 with 2DASG. Scatter transmission fraction (Ts) of 1DASG was 21%, and Ts was reduced to 5.8% with 2DASG. The average primary transmission fraction (Tp) of 1DASG was 70.6%, whereas Tp increased to 85.1% with 2DASG. Variation of Tp across 40 cm length (the long axis of flat panel detector) was 2.6%. Conclusion: When compared to conventional ASGs, the focused 2DASG can vastly improve scatter suppression and primary transmission performance. Due to precise alignment of 2DASG’s grid holes with respect to beam divergence, high degree of primary transmission through the 2DASG was maintained across the full length of the prototype. We strongly believe that robust scatter rejection and primary transmission characteristics of our 2DASG can translate into both improved quantitative accuracy and soft tissue resolution in linac mounted CBCT systems.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4957763},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: In transmitted X-ray tomography imaging, projections are sometimes incomplete due to a variety of reasons, such as geometry inaccuracy, defective detector cells, etc. To address this issue, we have derived a direct consistency condition based on John’s Equation, and proposed a method to effectively restore incomplete projections based on this consistency condition. Methods: Through parameter substitutions, we have derived a direct consistency condition equation from John’s equation, in which the left side is only projection derivative of view and the right side is projection derivative of other geometrical parameters. Based on this consistency condition, a projection restoration method ismore » proposed, which includes five steps: 1) Forward projecting reconstructed image and using linear interpolation to estimate the incomplete projections as the initial result; 2) Performing Fourier transform on the projections; 3) Restoring the incomplete frequency data using the consistency condition equation; 4) Performing inverse Fourier transform; 5) Repeat step 2)∼4) until our criteria is met to terminate the iteration. Results: A beam-blocking-based scatter correction case and a bad-pixel correction case were used to demonstrate the efficacy and robustness of our restoration method. The mean absolute error (MAE), signal noise ratio (SNR) and mean square error (MSE) were employed as our evaluation metrics of the reconstructed images. For the scatter correction case, the MAE is reduced from 63.3% to 71.7% with 4 iterations. Compared with the existing Patch’s method, the MAE of our method is further reduced by 8.72%. For the bad-pixel case, the SNR of the reconstructed image by our method is increased from 13.49% to 21.48%, with the MSE being decreased by 45.95%, compared with linear interpolation method. Conclusion: Our studies have demonstrated that our restoration method based on the new consistency condition could effectively restore the incomplete projections, especially for their high frequency component.« less
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