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Title: WE-AB-207A-09: Optimization of the Design of a Moving Blocker for Cone-Beam CT Scatter Correction: Experimental Evaluation

Abstract

Purpose: A moving blocker based strategy has shown promising results for scatter correction in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Different geometry designs and moving speeds of the blocker affect its performance in image reconstruction accuracy. The goal of this work is to optimize the geometric design and moving speed of the moving blocker system through experimental evaluations. Methods: An Elekta Synergy XVI system and an anthropomorphic pelvis phantom CIRS 801-P were used for our experiment. A blocker consisting of lead strips was inserted between the x-ray source and the phantom moving back and forth along rotation axis to measure the scatter signal. Accoriding to our Monte Carlo simulation results, three blockers were used, which have the same lead strip width 3.2mm and different gap between neighboring lead strips, 3.2, 6.4 and 9.6mm. For each blocker, three moving speeds were evaluated, 10, 20 and 30 pixels per projection (on the detector plane). Scatter signal in the unblocked region was estimated by cubic B-spline based interpolation from the blocked region. CBCT image was reconstructed by a total variation (TV) based algebraic iterative reconstruction (ART) algorithm from the partially blocked projection data. Reconstruction accuracy in each condition is quantified as CT number error ofmore » region of interest (ROI) by comparing to a CBCT reconstructed image from analytically simulated unblocked and scatter free projection data. Results: Highest reconstruction accuracy is achieved when the blocker width is 3.2 mm, the gap between neighboring lead strips is 9.6 mm and the moving speed is 20 pixels per projection. RMSE of the CT number of ROIs can be reduced from 436 to 27. Conclusions: Image reconstruction accuracy is greatly affected by the geometry design of the blocker. The moving speed does not have a very strong effect on reconstruction result if it is over 20 pixels per projection.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)
  2. Cyber Medical Corporation, Xi’an (China)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22654123
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ACCURACY; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; CORRECTIONS; DESIGN; GEOMETRY; IMAGE PROCESSING; ITERATIVE METHODS; MONTE CARLO METHOD; OPTIMIZATION; X-RAY SOURCES

Citation Formats

Chen, X, Ouyang, L, Jia, X, Zhang, Y, Wang, J, and Yan, H. WE-AB-207A-09: Optimization of the Design of a Moving Blocker for Cone-Beam CT Scatter Correction: Experimental Evaluation. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4957762.
Chen, X, Ouyang, L, Jia, X, Zhang, Y, Wang, J, & Yan, H. WE-AB-207A-09: Optimization of the Design of a Moving Blocker for Cone-Beam CT Scatter Correction: Experimental Evaluation. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957762.
Chen, X, Ouyang, L, Jia, X, Zhang, Y, Wang, J, and Yan, H. 2016. "WE-AB-207A-09: Optimization of the Design of a Moving Blocker for Cone-Beam CT Scatter Correction: Experimental Evaluation". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957762.
@article{osti_22654123,
title = {WE-AB-207A-09: Optimization of the Design of a Moving Blocker for Cone-Beam CT Scatter Correction: Experimental Evaluation},
author = {Chen, X and Ouyang, L and Jia, X and Zhang, Y and Wang, J and Yan, H},
abstractNote = {Purpose: A moving blocker based strategy has shown promising results for scatter correction in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Different geometry designs and moving speeds of the blocker affect its performance in image reconstruction accuracy. The goal of this work is to optimize the geometric design and moving speed of the moving blocker system through experimental evaluations. Methods: An Elekta Synergy XVI system and an anthropomorphic pelvis phantom CIRS 801-P were used for our experiment. A blocker consisting of lead strips was inserted between the x-ray source and the phantom moving back and forth along rotation axis to measure the scatter signal. Accoriding to our Monte Carlo simulation results, three blockers were used, which have the same lead strip width 3.2mm and different gap between neighboring lead strips, 3.2, 6.4 and 9.6mm. For each blocker, three moving speeds were evaluated, 10, 20 and 30 pixels per projection (on the detector plane). Scatter signal in the unblocked region was estimated by cubic B-spline based interpolation from the blocked region. CBCT image was reconstructed by a total variation (TV) based algebraic iterative reconstruction (ART) algorithm from the partially blocked projection data. Reconstruction accuracy in each condition is quantified as CT number error of region of interest (ROI) by comparing to a CBCT reconstructed image from analytically simulated unblocked and scatter free projection data. Results: Highest reconstruction accuracy is achieved when the blocker width is 3.2 mm, the gap between neighboring lead strips is 9.6 mm and the moving speed is 20 pixels per projection. RMSE of the CT number of ROIs can be reduced from 436 to 27. Conclusions: Image reconstruction accuracy is greatly affected by the geometry design of the blocker. The moving speed does not have a very strong effect on reconstruction result if it is over 20 pixels per projection.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4957762},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: A moving blocker based strategy has shown promising results for scatter correction in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Different parameters of the system design affect its performance in scatter estimation and image reconstruction accuracy. The goal of this work is to optimize the geometric design of the moving block system. Methods: In the moving blocker system, a blocker consisting of lead strips is inserted between the x-ray source and imaging object and moving back and forth along rotation axis during CBCT acquisition. CT image of an anthropomorphic pelvic phantom was used in the simulation study. Scatter signal was simulated bymore » Monte Carlo calculation with various combinations of the lead strip width and the gap between neighboring lead strips, ranging from 4 mm to 80 mm (projected at the detector plane). Scatter signal in the unblocked region was estimated by cubic B-spline interpolation from the blocked region. Scatter estimation accuracy was quantified as relative root mean squared error by comparing the interpolated scatter to the Monte Carlo simulated scatter. CBCT was reconstructed by total variation minimization from the unblocked region, under various combinations of the lead strip width and gap. Reconstruction accuracy in each condition is quantified by CT number error as comparing to a CBCT reconstructed from unblocked full projection data. Results: Scatter estimation error varied from 0.5% to 2.6% as the lead strip width and the gap varied from 4mm to 80mm. CT number error in the reconstructed CBCT images varied from 12 to 44. Highest reconstruction accuracy is achieved when the blocker lead strip width is 8 mm and the gap is 48 mm. Conclusions: Accurate scatter estimation can be achieved in large range of combinations of lead strip width and gap. However, image reconstruction accuracy is greatly affected by the geometry design of the blocker.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate a moving-blocker-based approach in estimating and correcting megavoltage (MV) and kilovoltage (kV) scatter contamination in kV cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) acquired during volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Methods: XML code was generated to enable concurrent CBCT acquisition and VMAT delivery in Varian TrueBeam developer mode. A physical attenuator (i.e., “blocker”) consisting of equal spaced lead strips (3.2mm strip width and 3.2mm gap in between) was mounted between the x-ray source and patient at a source to blocker distance of 232mm. The blocker was simulated to be moving back and forth along the gantry rotation axis during themore » CBCT acquisition. Both MV and kV scatter signal were estimated simultaneously from the blocked regions of the imaging panel, and interpolated into the un-blocked regions. Scatter corrected CBCT was then reconstructed from un-blocked projections after scatter subtraction using an iterative image reconstruction algorithm based on constraint optimization. Experimental studies were performed on a Catphan 600 phantom and an anthropomorphic pelvis phantom to demonstrate the feasibility of using moving blocker for MV-kV scatter correction. Results: MV scatter greatly degrades the CBCT image quality by increasing the CT number inaccuracy and decreasing the image contrast, in addition to the shading artifacts caused by kV scatter. The artifacts were substantially reduced in the moving blocker corrected CBCT images in both Catphan and pelvis phantoms. Quantitatively, CT number error in selected regions of interest reduced from 377 in the kV-MV contaminated CBCT image to 38 for the Catphan phantom. Conclusions: The moving-blockerbased strategy can successfully correct MV and kV scatter simultaneously in CBCT projection data acquired with concurrent VMAT delivery. This work was supported in part by a grant from the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas (RP130109) and a grant from the American Cancer Society (RSG-13-326-01-CCE)« less
  • Purpose: X-ray scatter incurred to detectors degrades the quality of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and represents a problem in volumetric image guided and adaptive radiation therapy. Several methods using a beam blocker for the estimation and subtraction of scatter have been proposed. However, due to missing information resulting from the obstruction of the blocker, such methods require dual scanning or dynamically moving blocker to obtain a complete volumetric image. Here, we propose a half beam blocker-based approach, in conjunction with a total variation (TV) regularized Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK) algorithm, to correct scatter-induced artifacts by simultaneously acquiring image and scatter information frommore » a single-rotation CBCT scan. Methods: A half beam blocker, comprising lead strips, is used to simultaneously acquire image data on one side of the projection data and scatter data on the other half side. One-dimensional cubic B-Spline interpolation/extrapolation is applied to derive patient specific scatter information by using the scatter distributions on strips. The estimated scatter is subtracted from the projection image acquired at the opposite view. With scatter-corrected projections where this subtraction is completed, the FDK algorithm based on a cosine weighting function is performed to reconstruct CBCT volume. To suppress the noise in the reconstructed CBCT images produced by geometric errors between two opposed projections and interpolated scatter information, total variation regularization is applied by a minimization using a steepest gradient descent optimization method. The experimental studies using Catphan504 and anthropomorphic phantoms were carried out to evaluate the performance of the proposed scheme. Results: The scatter-induced shading artifacts were markedly suppressed in CBCT using the proposed scheme. Compared with CBCT without a blocker, the nonuniformity value was reduced from 39.3% to 3.1%. The root mean square error relative to values inside the regions of interest selected from a benchmark scatter free image was reduced from 50 to 11.3. The TV regularization also led to a better contrast-to-noise ratio. Conclusions: An asymmetric half beam blocker-based FDK acquisition and reconstruction technique has been established. The proposed scheme enables simultaneous detection of patient specific scatter and complete volumetric CBCT reconstruction without additional requirements such as prior images, dual scans, or moving strips.« less
  • Purpose: X-ray scatter photons result in significant image quality degradation of cone-beam CT (CBCT). Measurement based algorithms using beam blocker directly acquire the scatter samples and achieve significant improvement on the quality of CBCT image. Within existing algorithms, single-scan and stationary beam blocker proposed previously is promising due to its simplicity and practicability. Although demonstrated effectively on tabletop system, the blocker fails to estimate the scatter distribution on clinical CBCT system mainly due to the gantry wobble. In addition, the uniform distributed blocker strips in our previous design results in primary data loss in the CBCT system and leads tomore » the image artifacts due to data insufficiency. Methods: We investigate the motion behavior of the beam blocker in each projection and design an optimized non-uniform blocker strip distribution which accounts for the data insufficiency issue. An accurate scatter estimation is then achieved from the wobble modeling. Blocker wobble curve is estimated using threshold-based segmentation algorithms in each projection. In the blocker design optimization, the quality of final image is quantified using the number of the primary data loss voxels and the mesh adaptive direct search algorithm is applied to minimize the objective function. Scatter-corrected CT images are obtained using the optimized blocker. Results: The proposed method is evaluated using Catphan@504 phantom and a head patient. On the Catphan©504, our approach reduces the average CT number error from 115 Hounsfield unit (HU) to 11 HU in the selected regions of interest, and improves the image contrast by a factor of 1.45 in the high-contrast regions. On the head patient, the CT number error is reduced from 97 HU to 6 HU in the soft tissue region and image spatial non-uniformity is decreased from 27% to 5% after correction. Conclusion: The proposed optimized blocker design is practical and attractive for CBCT guided radiation therapy. This work is supported by grants from Guangdong Innovative Research Team Program of China (Grant No. 2011S013), National 863 Programs of China (Grant Nos. 2012AA02A604 and 2015AA043203), the National High-tech R&D Program for Young Scientists by the Ministry of Science and Technology of China (Grant No. 2015AA020917)« less
  • Purpose: To improve CBCT image quality for image-guided radiotherapy by applying advanced reconstruction algorithms to overcome scatter, noise, and artifact limitations Methods: CBCT is used extensively for patient setup in radiotherapy. However, image quality generally falls short of diagnostic CT, limiting soft-tissue based positioning and potential applications such as adaptive radiotherapy. The conventional TrueBeam CBCT reconstructor uses a basic scatter correction and FDK reconstruction, resulting in residual scatter artifacts, suboptimal image noise characteristics, and other artifacts like cone-beam artifacts. We have developed an advanced scatter correction that uses a finite-element solver (AcurosCTS) to model the behavior of photons as theymore » pass (and scatter) through the object. Furthermore, iterative reconstruction is applied to the scatter-corrected projections, enforcing data consistency with statistical weighting and applying an edge-preserving image regularizer to reduce image noise. The combined algorithms have been implemented on a GPU. CBCT projections from clinically operating TrueBeam systems have been used to compare image quality between the conventional and improved reconstruction methods. Planning CT images of the same patients have also been compared. Results: The advanced scatter correction removes shading and inhomogeneity artifacts, reducing the scatter artifact from 99.5 HU to 13.7 HU in a typical pelvis case. Iterative reconstruction provides further benefit by reducing image noise and eliminating streak artifacts, thereby improving soft-tissue visualization. In a clinical head and pelvis CBCT, the noise was reduced by 43% and 48%, respectively, with no change in spatial resolution (assessed visually). Additional benefits include reduction of cone-beam artifacts and reduction of metal artifacts due to intrinsic downweighting of corrupted rays. Conclusion: The combination of an advanced scatter correction with iterative reconstruction substantially improves CBCT image quality. It is anticipated that clinically acceptable reconstruction times will result from a multi-GPU implementation (the algorithms are under active development and not yet commercially available). All authors are employees of and (may) own stock of Varian Medical Systems.« less