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Title: WE-AB-202-08: Feasibility of Single-Inhalation/Single-Energy Xenon CT for High-Resolution Imaging of Regional Lung Ventilation in Humans

Abstract

Purpose: To demonstrate the efficacy of a novel functional lung imaging method that utilizes single-inhalation, single-energy xenon CT (Xe-CT) lung ventilation scans, and to compare it against the current clinical standard, ventilation single-photon emission CT (V-SPECT). Methods: In an IRB-approved clinical study, 14 patients undergoing thoracic radiotherapy received two successive single inhalation, single energy (80keV) CT images of the entire lung using 100% oxygen and a 70%/30% xenon-oxygen mixture. A subset of ten patients also received concurrent SPECT ventilation scans. Anatomic reproducibility between the two scans was achieved using a custom video biofeedback apparatus. The CT images were registered to each other by deformable registration, and a calculated difference image served as surrogate xenon ventilation map. Both lungs were partitioned into twelve sectors, and a sector-wise correlation was performed between the xenon and V-SPECT scans. A linear regression model was developed with forced expiratory volume (FEV) as a predictor and the coefficient of variation (CoV) as the outcome. Results: The ventilation comparison for five of the patients had either moderate to strong Pearson correlation coefficients (0.47 to 0.69, p<0.05). Of these, four also had moderate to strong Spearman correlation coefficients (0.46 to 0.80, p<0.03). The patients with the strongest correlationmore » had clear regional ventilation deficits. The patient comparisons with the weakest correlations had more homogeneous ventilation distributions, and those patients also had diminished lung function as assessed by spirometry. Analysis of the relationship between CoV and FEV yielded a non-significant trend toward negative correlation (Pearson coefficient −0.60, p<0.15). Conclusion: Significant correlations were found between the Xe-CT and V-SPECT ventilation imagery. The results from this small cohort of patients indicate that single inhalation, single energy Xe-CT has the potential to quantify regional lung ventilation volumetrically with high resolution using widely accessible radiologic equipment. Bill Loo and Peter Maxim are founders of TibaRay, Inc. Bill Loo is also a board member. Bill Loo and Peter Maxim have received research grants from Varian Medical Systems, Inc. and RaySearch Laboratory.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;  [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, California (United States)
  2. IBM Research Center, San Jose, California (United States)
  3. University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22654110
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; CORRELATIONS; IMAGE PROCESSING; IMAGES; LUNGS; PATIENTS; POSITRON COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY; SINGLE PHOTON EMISSION COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY; XENON

Citation Formats

Pinkham, D, Schueler, E, Diehn, M, Mittra, E, Loo, B, Maxim, P, Negahdar, M, and Yamamoto, T. WE-AB-202-08: Feasibility of Single-Inhalation/Single-Energy Xenon CT for High-Resolution Imaging of Regional Lung Ventilation in Humans. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4957749.
Pinkham, D, Schueler, E, Diehn, M, Mittra, E, Loo, B, Maxim, P, Negahdar, M, & Yamamoto, T. WE-AB-202-08: Feasibility of Single-Inhalation/Single-Energy Xenon CT for High-Resolution Imaging of Regional Lung Ventilation in Humans. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957749.
Pinkham, D, Schueler, E, Diehn, M, Mittra, E, Loo, B, Maxim, P, Negahdar, M, and Yamamoto, T. 2016. "WE-AB-202-08: Feasibility of Single-Inhalation/Single-Energy Xenon CT for High-Resolution Imaging of Regional Lung Ventilation in Humans". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957749.
@article{osti_22654110,
title = {WE-AB-202-08: Feasibility of Single-Inhalation/Single-Energy Xenon CT for High-Resolution Imaging of Regional Lung Ventilation in Humans},
author = {Pinkham, D and Schueler, E and Diehn, M and Mittra, E and Loo, B and Maxim, P and Negahdar, M and Yamamoto, T},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To demonstrate the efficacy of a novel functional lung imaging method that utilizes single-inhalation, single-energy xenon CT (Xe-CT) lung ventilation scans, and to compare it against the current clinical standard, ventilation single-photon emission CT (V-SPECT). Methods: In an IRB-approved clinical study, 14 patients undergoing thoracic radiotherapy received two successive single inhalation, single energy (80keV) CT images of the entire lung using 100% oxygen and a 70%/30% xenon-oxygen mixture. A subset of ten patients also received concurrent SPECT ventilation scans. Anatomic reproducibility between the two scans was achieved using a custom video biofeedback apparatus. The CT images were registered to each other by deformable registration, and a calculated difference image served as surrogate xenon ventilation map. Both lungs were partitioned into twelve sectors, and a sector-wise correlation was performed between the xenon and V-SPECT scans. A linear regression model was developed with forced expiratory volume (FEV) as a predictor and the coefficient of variation (CoV) as the outcome. Results: The ventilation comparison for five of the patients had either moderate to strong Pearson correlation coefficients (0.47 to 0.69, p<0.05). Of these, four also had moderate to strong Spearman correlation coefficients (0.46 to 0.80, p<0.03). The patients with the strongest correlation had clear regional ventilation deficits. The patient comparisons with the weakest correlations had more homogeneous ventilation distributions, and those patients also had diminished lung function as assessed by spirometry. Analysis of the relationship between CoV and FEV yielded a non-significant trend toward negative correlation (Pearson coefficient −0.60, p<0.15). Conclusion: Significant correlations were found between the Xe-CT and V-SPECT ventilation imagery. The results from this small cohort of patients indicate that single inhalation, single energy Xe-CT has the potential to quantify regional lung ventilation volumetrically with high resolution using widely accessible radiologic equipment. Bill Loo and Peter Maxim are founders of TibaRay, Inc. Bill Loo is also a board member. Bill Loo and Peter Maxim have received research grants from Varian Medical Systems, Inc. and RaySearch Laboratory.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4957749},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: We propose a novel lung functional imaging method to determine the spatial distribution of xenon (Xe) gas in a single inhalation as a measure of regional ventilation. We compare Xe-CT ventilation to single-photon emission CT (SPECT) ventilation, which is the current clinical reference. Regional lung ventilation information may be useful for the diagnosis and monitoring of pulmonary diseases such as COPD, radiotherapy planning, and assessing the progression of toxicity after radiation therapy. Methods: In an IRB-approved clinical study, Xe-CT and SPECT ventilation scans were acquired for three patients including one patient with severe emphysema and two lung cancer patientsmore » treated with radiotherapy. For Xe- CT, we acquired two breath-hold single energy CT images of the entire lung with inspiration of 100% O2 and a mixture of 70% Xe and 30% O2, respectively. A video biofeedback system was used to achieve reproducible breath-holds. We used deformable image registration to align the breathhold images with each other to accurately subtract them, producing a map of the distribution of Xe as a surrogate of lung ventilation. We divided each lung into twelve parts and correlated the Hounsfield unit (HU) enhancement at each part with the SPECT ventilation count of the corresponding part of the lung. Results: The mean of the Pearson linear correlation coefficient values between the Xe-CT and ventilation SPECT count for all three patients were 0.62 (p<0.01). The Xe-CT image had a higher resolution than SPECT, and did not show central airway deposition artifacts that were present in the SPECT image. Conclusion: We developed a rapid, safe, clinically practical, and potentially widely accessible method for regional lung functional imaging. We demonstrated strong correlations between the Xe-CT ventilation image and SPECT ventilation image as the clinical reference. This ongoing study will investigate more patients to confirm this finding.« less
  • The use of xenon Xe-133 ventilation-perfusion lung scans for the early diagnosis of inhalation injury was evaluated in 67 patients with acute thermal burns. Study results were interpreted as normal if there was complete pulmonary clearance of the radioactive gas by 150 seconds. Thirty-two scans were normal, 32 abnormal, and three technically inadequate. There were three true false-positive study results and one false-negative study result. Good correlation was found between the scan results and various historical, physical, and laboratory values currently used to evaluate inhalation injury. The scans appeared to be the most sensitive method for the detection of earlymore » involvement, often being abnormal several days before the chest roentgenogram. Xenon lung scanning is a safe, easy, accurate, and sensitive method for the early diagnosis of inhalation injury and has important therapeutic and prognostic implications as well.« less
  • Purpose: To test the hypothesis: 4D-CT ventilation imaging can show the known effects of radiotherapy on lung function: (1) radiation-induced ventilation reductions, and (2) ventilation increases caused by tumor regression. Methods: Repeat 4D-CT scans (pre-, mid- and/or post-treatment) were acquired prospectively for 11 thoracic cancer patients in an IRB-approved clinical trial. A ventilation image for each time point was created using deformable image registration and the Hounsfield unit (HU)-based or Jacobian-based metric. The 11 patients were divided into two subgroups based on tumor volume reduction using a threshold of 5 cm{sup 3}. To quantify radiation-induced ventilation reduction, six patients whomore » showed a small tumor volume reduction (<5 cm{sup 3}) were analyzed for dose-response relationships. To investigate ventilation increase caused by tumor regression, two of the other five patients were analyzed to compare ventilation changes in the lung lobes affected and unaffected by the tumor. The remaining three patients were excluded because there were no unaffected lobes. Results: Dose-dependent reductions of HU-based ventilation were observed in a majority of the patient-specific dose-response curves and in the population-based dose-response curve, whereas no clear relationship was seen for Jacobian-based ventilation. The post-treatment population-based dose-response curve of HU-based ventilation demonstrated the average ventilation reductions of 20.9±7.0% at 35–40 Gy (equivalent dose in 2-Gy fractions, EQD2), and 40.6±22.9% at 75–80 Gy EQD2. Remarkable ventilation increases in the affected lobes were observed for the two patients who showed an average tumor volume reduction of 37.1 cm{sup 3} and re-opening airways. The mid-treatment increase in HU-based ventilation of patient 3 was 100.4% in the affected lobes, which was considerably greater than 7.8% in the unaffected lobes. Conclusion: This study has demonstrated that 4D-CT ventilation imaging shows the known effects of radiotherapy on lung function: radiation-induced ventilation reduction and ventilation increase caused by tumor regression, providing validation for 4D-CT ventilation imaging. This study was supported in part by a National Lung Cancer Partnership Young Investigator Research grant.« less
  • Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of complete target immobilization by means of high-frequency jet ventilation (HFJV); and to show that the saving of planning target volume (PTV) on the stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) under HFJV, compared with SBRT with respiratory motion, can be predicted with reliable accuracy by computed tomography (CT) scans at peak inspiration phase. Methods and Materials: A comparison regarding different methods for defining the PTV was carried out in 22 patients with tumors that clearly moved with respiration. A movement span of the gross tumor volume (GTV) was defined by fusing respiration-correlated CT scans. The PTVmore » enclosed the GTV positions with a safety margin throughout the breathing cycle. To create a PTV from CT scans acquired under HFJV, the same margins were drawn around the immobilized target. In addition, peak inspiration phase CT images (PIP-CTs) were used to approximate a target immobilized by HFJV. Results: The resulting HFJV-PTVs were between 11.6% and 45.4% smaller than the baseline values calculated as respiration-correlated CT-PTVs (median volume reduction, 25.4%). Tentative planning by means of PIP-CT PTVs predicted that in 19 of 22 patients, use of HFJV would lead to a reduction in volume of {>=}20%. Using this threshold yielded a positive predictive value of 0.89, as well as a sensitivity of 0.94 and a specificity of 0.5. Conclusions: In all patients, SBRT under HFJV provided a reliable immobilization of the GTVs and achieved a reduction in PTVs, regardless of patient compliance. Tentative planning facilitated the selection of patients who could better undergo radiation in respiratory standstill, both with greater accuracy and lung protection.« less
  • We have described a patient with paralysis of the diaphragm, in whom dyspnea, hypoxemia, and hypercapnia increased when he changed from the upright to the supine position. Ventilation (V) and perfusion (P) images of the right lung appeared to be normal and remained nearly the same in the upright and supine positions. In contrast, V and P images of the left lung were smaller than those of the right lung in the upright position and decreased further in the supine position. In addition, the ventilation image of the left lung was much smaller than the perfusion image in both positions.