skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: WE-AB-BRA-11: Improved Imaging of Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy Seed Implants by Combining an Endorectal X-Ray Sensor with a CT Scanner

Abstract

Purpose: To test feasibility of the use of a digital endorectal x-ray sensor for improved image resolution of permanent brachytherapy seed implants compared to conventional CT. Methods: Two phantoms simulating the male pelvic region were used to test the capabilities of a digital endorectal x-ray sensor for imaging permanent brachytherapy seed implants. Phantom 1 was constructed from acrylic plastic with cavities milled in the locations of the prostate and the rectum. The prostate cavity was filled a Styrofoam plug implanted with 10 training seeds. Phantom 2 was constructed from tissue-equivalent gelatins and contained a prostate phantom implanted with 18 strands of training seeds. For both phantoms, an intraoral digital dental x-ray sensor was placed in the rectum within 2 cm of the seed implants. Scout scans were taken of the phantoms over a limited arc angle using a CT scanner (80 kV, 120–200 mA). The dental sensor was removed from the phantoms and normal helical CT and scout (0 degree) scans using typical parameters for pelvic CT (120 kV, auto-mA) were collected. A shift-and add tomosynthesis algorithm was developed to localize seed plane location normal to detector face. Results: The endorectal sensor produced images with improved resolution compared to CTmore » scans. Seed clusters and individual seed geometry were more discernable using the endorectal sensor. Seed 3D locations, including seeds that were not located in every projection image, were discernable using the shift and add algorithm. Conclusion: This work shows that digital endorectal x-ray sensors are a feasible method for improving imaging of permanent brachytherapy seed implants. Future work will consist of optimizing the tomosynthesis technique to produce higher resolution, lower dose images of 1) permanent brachytherapy seed implants for post-implant dosimetry and 2) fine anatomic details for imaging and managing prostatic disease compared to CT images. Funding: LSU Faculty Start-up Funding. Disclosure: XDR Radiography has loaned our research group the digital x-ray detector used in this work. CoI: None.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22654101
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; BRACHYTHERAPY; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; IMAGES; PHANTOMS; PROSTATE; RADIATION SOURCE IMPLANTS; RESOLUTION; SENSORS; X RADIATION

Citation Formats

Steiner, J, Matthews, K, and Jia, G. WE-AB-BRA-11: Improved Imaging of Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy Seed Implants by Combining an Endorectal X-Ray Sensor with a CT Scanner. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4957740.
Steiner, J, Matthews, K, & Jia, G. WE-AB-BRA-11: Improved Imaging of Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy Seed Implants by Combining an Endorectal X-Ray Sensor with a CT Scanner. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957740.
Steiner, J, Matthews, K, and Jia, G. 2016. "WE-AB-BRA-11: Improved Imaging of Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy Seed Implants by Combining an Endorectal X-Ray Sensor with a CT Scanner". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957740.
@article{osti_22654101,
title = {WE-AB-BRA-11: Improved Imaging of Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy Seed Implants by Combining an Endorectal X-Ray Sensor with a CT Scanner},
author = {Steiner, J and Matthews, K and Jia, G},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To test feasibility of the use of a digital endorectal x-ray sensor for improved image resolution of permanent brachytherapy seed implants compared to conventional CT. Methods: Two phantoms simulating the male pelvic region were used to test the capabilities of a digital endorectal x-ray sensor for imaging permanent brachytherapy seed implants. Phantom 1 was constructed from acrylic plastic with cavities milled in the locations of the prostate and the rectum. The prostate cavity was filled a Styrofoam plug implanted with 10 training seeds. Phantom 2 was constructed from tissue-equivalent gelatins and contained a prostate phantom implanted with 18 strands of training seeds. For both phantoms, an intraoral digital dental x-ray sensor was placed in the rectum within 2 cm of the seed implants. Scout scans were taken of the phantoms over a limited arc angle using a CT scanner (80 kV, 120–200 mA). The dental sensor was removed from the phantoms and normal helical CT and scout (0 degree) scans using typical parameters for pelvic CT (120 kV, auto-mA) were collected. A shift-and add tomosynthesis algorithm was developed to localize seed plane location normal to detector face. Results: The endorectal sensor produced images with improved resolution compared to CT scans. Seed clusters and individual seed geometry were more discernable using the endorectal sensor. Seed 3D locations, including seeds that were not located in every projection image, were discernable using the shift and add algorithm. Conclusion: This work shows that digital endorectal x-ray sensors are a feasible method for improving imaging of permanent brachytherapy seed implants. Future work will consist of optimizing the tomosynthesis technique to produce higher resolution, lower dose images of 1) permanent brachytherapy seed implants for post-implant dosimetry and 2) fine anatomic details for imaging and managing prostatic disease compared to CT images. Funding: LSU Faculty Start-up Funding. Disclosure: XDR Radiography has loaned our research group the digital x-ray detector used in this work. CoI: None.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4957740},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: Permanent prostate implant brachytherapy (PPI), three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), and conformal proton beam radiotherapy (CPBRT) are used in the treatment of localized prostate cancer, although no head-to-head trials have compared these modalities. We studied the biochemical control (biochemical no evidence of disease [bNED]) and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) nadir achieved with contemporary PPI, and evaluated it against 3D-CRT and CPBRT. Patients and Methods: A total of 249 patients were treated with PPI at the University of California, San Francisco, and the outcomes were compared with those from a 3D-CRT cohort and the published results of a high-dose CPBRT boost (CPBRTB)more » trial. For each comparison, subsets of the PPI cohort were selected with patient and disease criteria similar to those of the reference group. Results: With a median follow-up of 5.3 years, the bNED rate at 5 and 7 years achieved with PPI was 92% and 86%, respectively, using the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) definition, and 93% using the PSA nadir plus 2 ng/mL definition. Using the ASTRO definition, a 5-year bNED rate of 78% was achieved for the 3D-CRT patients compared with 94% for a comparable PPI subset and 93% vs. 92%, respectively, using the PSA nadir plus 2 ng/mL definition. The median PSA nadir for patients treated with PPI and 3D-CRT was 0.10 and 0.40 ng/mL, respectively (p < .0001). For the CPBRT comparison, the 5-year bNED rate after a CPBRTB was 91% using the ASTRO definition vs. 93% for a similar group of PPI patients. A greater proportion of PPI patients achieved a lower PSA nadir compared with those achieved in the CPBRTB trial (PSA nadir <=0.5 ng/mL, 91% vs. 59%, respectively). Conclusion: We have demonstrated excellent outcomes in low- to intermediate-risk patients treated with PPI, suggesting at least equivalent 5-year bNED rates and a greater proportion of men achieving lower PSA nadirs compared with 3D-CRT or CPBRTB.« less
  • Purpose: To present a method for the dosimetric analysis of permanent prostate brachytherapy implants using a combination of stereoscopic X-ray radiography and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (XMR) in an XMR facility, and to compare the clinical results between XMR- and computed tomography (CT)-based dosimetry. Methods and Materials: Patients who had received nonstranded iodine-125 permanent prostate brachytherapy implants underwent XMR and CT imaging 4 weeks later. Four observers outlined the prostate gland on both sets of images. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were derived, and agreement was compared among the observers and between the modalities. Results: A total of 30 patients were evaluated.more » Inherent XMR registration based on prior calibration and optical tracking required a further automatic seed registration step that revealed a median root mean square registration error of 4.2 mm (range, 1.6-11.4). The observers agreed significantly more closely on prostate base and apex positions as well as outlining contours on the MR images than on those from CT. Coefficients of variation were significantly higher for observed prostate volumes, D90, and V100 parameters on CT-based dosimetry as opposed to XMR. The XMR-based dosimetry showed little agreement with that from CT for all observers, with D90 95% limits of agreement ranges of 65, 118, 79, and 73 Gy for Observers 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. Conclusions: The study results showed that XMR-based dosimetry offers an alternative to other imaging modalities and registration methods with the advantages of MR-based prostate delineation and confident three-dimensional reconstruction of the implant. The XMR-derived dose-volume histograms differ from the CT-derived values and demonstrate less interobserver variability.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate the metabolic response by comparing the time to resolution of spectroscopic abnormalities (TRSA) and the time to prostate-specific antigen level in low-risk prostate cancer patients after treatment with three-dimensional conformal external beam radiotherapy (3D-CRT) compared with permanent prostate implantation (PPI). Recent studies have suggested that the treatment of low-risk prostate cancer yields similar results for patients treated with 3D-CRT or PPI. Methods and Materials: A total of 50 patients, 25 in each group, who had been treated with 3D-CRT or PPI, had undergone endorectal magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging before and/or at varying times after therapy. The 3D-CRTmore » patients had received radiation doses of {>=}72 Gy compared with 144 Gy for the PPI patients. The spectra from all usable voxels were examined for detectable levels of metabolic signal, and the percentages of atrophic and cancerous voxels were tabulated. Results: The median time to resolution of the spectroscopic abnormalities was 32.2 and 24.8 months and the time to the nadir prostate-specific antigen level was 52.4 and 38.0 months for the 3D-CRT and PPI patients, respectively. Of the 3D-CRT patients, 92% achieved negative endorectal magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging findings, with 40% having complete metabolic atrophy. All 25 PPI patients had negative endorectal magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging findings, with 60% achieving complete metabolic atrophy. Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that metabolic and biochemical responses of the prostate are more pronounced after PPI. Our results have not proved PPI is more effective at curing prostate cancer, but they have demonstrated that it may be more effective at destroying prostate metabolism.« less
  • Purpose: To investigate the effects of brachytherapy seed size on the quality of x-ray computed tomography (CT), ultrasound (US), and magnetic resonance (MR) images and seed localization through comparison of the 6711 and 9011 {sup 125}I sources. Methods: For CT images, an acrylic phantom mimicking a clinical implantation plan and embedded with low contrast regions of interest (ROIs) was designed for both the 0.774 mm diameter 6711 (standard) and the 0.508 mm diameter 9011 (thin) seed models (Oncura, Inc., and GE Healthcare, Arlington Heights, IL). Image quality metrics were assessed using the standard deviation of ROIs between the seeds andmore » the contrast to noise ratio (CNR) within the low contrast ROIs. For US images, water phantoms with both single and multiseed arrangements were constructed for both seed sizes. For MR images, both seeds were implanted into a porcine gel and imaged with pelvic imaging protocols. The standard deviation of ROIs and CNR values were used as metrics of artifact quantification. Seed localization within the CT images was assessed using the automated seed finder in a commercial brachytherapy treatment planning system. The number of erroneous seed placements and the average and maximum error in seed placements were recorded as metrics of the localization accuracy. Results: With the thin seeds, CT image noise was reduced from 48.5 {+-} 0.2 to 32.0 {+-} 0.2 HU and CNR improved by a median value of 74% when compared with the standard seeds. Ultrasound image noise was measured at 50.3 {+-} 17.1 dB for the thin seed images and 50.0 {+-} 19.8 dB for the standard seed images, and artifacts directly behind the seeds were smaller and less prominent with the thin seed model. For MR images, CNR of the standard seeds reduced on average 17% when using the thin seeds for all different imaging sequences and seed orientations, but these differences are not appreciable. Automated seed localization required an average ({+-}SD) of 7.0 {+-} 3.5 manual corrections in seed positions for the thin seed scans and 3.0 {+-} 1.2 manual corrections in seed positions for the standard seed scans. The average error in seed placement was 1.2 mm for both seed types and the maximum error in seed placement was 2.1 mm for the thin seed scans and 1.8 mm for the standard seed scans. Conclusions: The 9011 thin seeds yielded significantly improved image quality for CT and US images but no significant differences in MR image quality.« less
  • Purpose: To compare contrast-enhanced, T1-weighted, three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (CEMR) and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (T2MR) with computed tomography (CT) for prostate brachytherapy seed location for dosimetric calculations. Methods and Materials: Postbrachytherapy prostate MRI was performed on a 1.5 Tesla unit with combined surface and endorectal coils in 13 patients. Both CEMR and T2MR used a section thickness of 3 mm. Spiral CT used a section thickness of 5 mm with a pitch factor of 1.5. All images were obtained in the transverse plane. Two readers using CT and MR imaging assessed brachytherapy seed distribution independently. The dependency of datamore » read by both readers for a specific subject was assessed with a linear mixed effects model. Results: The mean percentage ({+-} standard deviation) values of the readers for seed detection and location are presented. Of 1205 implanted seeds, CEMR, T2MR, and CT detected 91.5% {+-} 4.8%, 78.5% {+-} 8.5%, and 96.1% {+-} 2.3%, respectively, with 11.8% {+-} 4.5%, 8.5% {+-} 3.5%, 1.9% {+-} 1.0% extracapsular, respectively. Assignment to periprostatic structures was not possible with CT. Periprostatic seed assignments for CEMR and T2MR, respectively, were as follows: neurovascular bundle, 3.5% {+-} 1.6% and 2.1% {+-} 0.9%; seminal vesicles, 0.9% {+-} 1.8% and 0.3% {+-} 0.7%; periurethral, 7.1% {+-} 3.3% and 5.8% {+-} 2.9%; penile bulb, 0.6% {+-} 0.8% and 0.3% {+-} 0.6%; Denonvillier's Fascia/rectal wall, 0.5% {+-} 0.6% and 0%; and urinary bladder, 0.1% {+-} 0.3% and 0%. Data dependency analysis showed statistical significance for the type of imaging but not for reader identification. Conclusion: Both enumeration and localization of implanted seeds are readily accomplished with CEMR. Calculations with MRI dosimetry do not require CT data. Dose determinations to specific extracapsular sites can be obtained with MRI but not with CT.« less