skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: WE-AB-BRA-03: Non-Invasive Controlled Release from Implantable Hydrogel Scaffolds Using Ultrasound

Abstract

Purpose: To control release of a model payload in acoustically responsive scaffolds (ARSs) using focused ultrasound (FUS). Methods: Fluorescently-labeled dextran (10 kDa) was encapsulated in sonosensitive perfluorocarbon (C{sub 6}F{sub 14} or C{sub 5}F{sub 12}) double emulsions (mean diameter: 2.9±0.1 µm). For in vitro release studies, 0.5 mL ARSs (10 mg/mL fibrin, 1% (v/v) emulsion) were polymerized in 24 well plates and covered with 0.5 mL medium. Starting one day after polymerization, ARSs were exposed to FUS (2.5 MHz, Pr = 8 MPa, 13 cycles, 100 Hz PRF) for 2 min daily. The amount of dextran released into the media was quantified. For in vivo studies, 0.25 mL ARSs were prepared as described previously and injected subcutaneously in the lower back of BALB/c mice. After polymerization, a subset of the implanted ARSs were exposed to FUS (as previously described). Animals were imaged longitudinally using a fluorescence imaging system to quantify the amount of dextran released from the ARSs. Results: In vitro: Over 6 days, +FUS displayed an 8.2-fold increase in dextran release compared to −FUS (−FUS: 2.7±0.6%; +FUS: 22.2±3.0%) for C{sub 6}F{sub 14} ARSs, and a 6.7-fold increase (−FUS: 5.0±0.8%; +FUS: 38.5±1.6%) for C{sub 5}F{sub 12}:C{sub 6}F{sub 14} ARSs. In vivo:more » +FUS displayed statistically greater dextran release compared to −FUS one day after implantation for C{sub 5}F{sub 12}:C{sub 6}F{sub 14} ARSs (−FUS: 55.1±1.5%; +FUS: 74.1±2.2%) and three days after implantation for C{sub 6}F{sub 14} ARSs (−FUS: 1.4±6.5%; +FUS: 30.4±5.4%). Conclusion: FUS enables non-invasive control of payload release from an ARS, which could benefit growth factor delivery for tissue regeneration. ARS are versatile due to their tunability (i.e. stiffness, emulsion composition, FUS pressure, FUS frequency, etc.) and can be modified to for optimal payload release. Future work will optimize ARS formulations for in vivo use to minimize payload release in the absence of FUS. This work was supported by NIH Grant R21 AR065010 (M.L. Fabiilli) and the Basic Radiologic Sciences Innovative Research Award (M.L. Fabiilli). A. Moncion is supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Student Research Fellowship (Grant DGE 1256260).« less

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22654094
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; DEXTRAN; EMULSIONS; FLUORINE COMPOUNDS; GROWTH FACTORS; MHZ RANGE 01-100; PLANT GROWTH; PRESSURE RANGE MEGA PA; ULTRASONOGRAPHY

Citation Formats

Moncion, A, Kripfgans, O.D, Putnam, A.J, Frances chi, R.T, and Fabiilli, M.L. WE-AB-BRA-03: Non-Invasive Controlled Release from Implantable Hydrogel Scaffolds Using Ultrasound. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4957732.
Moncion, A, Kripfgans, O.D, Putnam, A.J, Frances chi, R.T, & Fabiilli, M.L. WE-AB-BRA-03: Non-Invasive Controlled Release from Implantable Hydrogel Scaffolds Using Ultrasound. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957732.
Moncion, A, Kripfgans, O.D, Putnam, A.J, Frances chi, R.T, and Fabiilli, M.L. 2016. "WE-AB-BRA-03: Non-Invasive Controlled Release from Implantable Hydrogel Scaffolds Using Ultrasound". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957732.
@article{osti_22654094,
title = {WE-AB-BRA-03: Non-Invasive Controlled Release from Implantable Hydrogel Scaffolds Using Ultrasound},
author = {Moncion, A and Kripfgans, O.D and Putnam, A.J and Frances chi, R.T and Fabiilli, M.L},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To control release of a model payload in acoustically responsive scaffolds (ARSs) using focused ultrasound (FUS). Methods: Fluorescently-labeled dextran (10 kDa) was encapsulated in sonosensitive perfluorocarbon (C{sub 6}F{sub 14} or C{sub 5}F{sub 12}) double emulsions (mean diameter: 2.9±0.1 µm). For in vitro release studies, 0.5 mL ARSs (10 mg/mL fibrin, 1% (v/v) emulsion) were polymerized in 24 well plates and covered with 0.5 mL medium. Starting one day after polymerization, ARSs were exposed to FUS (2.5 MHz, Pr = 8 MPa, 13 cycles, 100 Hz PRF) for 2 min daily. The amount of dextran released into the media was quantified. For in vivo studies, 0.25 mL ARSs were prepared as described previously and injected subcutaneously in the lower back of BALB/c mice. After polymerization, a subset of the implanted ARSs were exposed to FUS (as previously described). Animals were imaged longitudinally using a fluorescence imaging system to quantify the amount of dextran released from the ARSs. Results: In vitro: Over 6 days, +FUS displayed an 8.2-fold increase in dextran release compared to −FUS (−FUS: 2.7±0.6%; +FUS: 22.2±3.0%) for C{sub 6}F{sub 14} ARSs, and a 6.7-fold increase (−FUS: 5.0±0.8%; +FUS: 38.5±1.6%) for C{sub 5}F{sub 12}:C{sub 6}F{sub 14} ARSs. In vivo: +FUS displayed statistically greater dextran release compared to −FUS one day after implantation for C{sub 5}F{sub 12}:C{sub 6}F{sub 14} ARSs (−FUS: 55.1±1.5%; +FUS: 74.1±2.2%) and three days after implantation for C{sub 6}F{sub 14} ARSs (−FUS: 1.4±6.5%; +FUS: 30.4±5.4%). Conclusion: FUS enables non-invasive control of payload release from an ARS, which could benefit growth factor delivery for tissue regeneration. ARS are versatile due to their tunability (i.e. stiffness, emulsion composition, FUS pressure, FUS frequency, etc.) and can be modified to for optimal payload release. Future work will optimize ARS formulations for in vivo use to minimize payload release in the absence of FUS. This work was supported by NIH Grant R21 AR065010 (M.L. Fabiilli) and the Basic Radiologic Sciences Innovative Research Award (M.L. Fabiilli). A. Moncion is supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Student Research Fellowship (Grant DGE 1256260).},
doi = {10.1118/1.4957732},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Stimulus-responsive hydrogel materials that stabilize and control protein dynamics have the potential to enable a range of applications to take advantage of the inherent specificity and catalytic efficiencies of proteins. Here we describe the modular construction of a hydrogel using an engineered calmodulin (CaM) within a polyethylene glycol (PEG) matrix that involves the reversible tethering of proteins through an engineered CaM-binding sequence. For these measurements, maltose binding protein (MBP) was isotopically labeled with [13C] and [15N], permitting dynamic structural measurements using TROSY-HSQC NMR spectroscopy. Upon initial formation of hydrogels protein dynamics are suppressed, with concomitant increases in protein stability. Relaxationmore » of the hydrogel matrix following transient heating results in the activation of protein dynamics and restoration of substrate-induced large-amplitude domain motions necessary for substrate binding.« less
  • As a first step toward the design and fabrication of biomimetic bonelike composite materials, we have developed a template-driven nucleation and mineral growth process for the high-affinity integration of hydroxyapatite with a poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (pHEMA) hydrogel scaffold. A mineralization technique was developed that exposes carboxylate groups on the surface of cross-linked pHEMA, promoting high-affinity nucleation and growth of calcium phosphate on the surface, along with extensive calcification of the hydrogel interior. Robust surface mineral layers a few microns thick were obtained. The same mineralization technique, when applied to a hydrogel that is less prone to surface hydrolysis, led to distinctlymore » different mineralization patterns, in terms of both the extent of mineralization and the crystallinity of the apatite grown on the hydrogel surface. This template-driven mineralization technique provides an efficient approach toward bonelike composites with high mineral -hydrogel interfacial adhesion strength.« less
  • As a first step toward the design and fabrication of biomimetic bonelike composite materials, we have developed a template-driven nucleation and mineral growth process for the high-affinity integration of hydroxyapatite with a poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (pHEMA) hydrogel scaffold. A mineralization technique was developed that exposes carboxylate groups on the surface of cross-linked pHEMA, promoting high-affinity nucleation and growth of calcium phosphate on the surface, along with extensive calcification of the hydrogel interior. Robust surface mineral layers a few microns thick were obtained. The same mineralization technique, when applied to a hydrogel that is less prone to surface hydrolysis, led to distinctlymore » different mineralization patterns, in terms of both the extent of mineralization and the crystallinity of the apatite grown on the hydrogel surface. This template-driven mineralization technique provides an efficient approach toward bonelike composites with high mineral -hydrogel interfacial adhesion strength.« less
  • Integration into a soft material of all the molecular components necessary to generate storable fuels is an interesting target in supramolecular chemistry. The concept is inspired by the internal structure of photosynthetic organelles, such as plant chloroplasts, which colocalize molecules involved in light absorption, charge transport and catalysis to create chemical bonds using light energy. We report in this paper on the light-driven production of hydrogen inside a hydrogel scaffold built by the supramolecular self-assembly of a perylene monoimide amphiphile. The charged ribbons formed can electrostatically attract a nickel-based catalyst, and electrolyte screening promotes gelation. We found the emergent phenomenonmore » that screening by the catalyst or the electrolytes led to two-dimensional crystallization of the chromophore assemblies and enhanced the electronic coupling among the molecules. Finally, photocatalytic production of hydrogen is observed in the three-dimensional environment of the hydrogel scaffold and the material is easily placed on surfaces or in the pores of solid supports.« less