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Title: TU-H-CAMPUS-IeP3-02: Neurovascular 4D Parametric Imaging Using Co-Registration of Biplane DSA Sequences with 3D Vascular Geometry Obtained From Cone Beam CT

Abstract

Purpose: To create 4D parametric images using biplane Digital Subtraction Angiography (DSA) sequences co-registered with the 3D vascular geometry obtained from Cone Beam-CT (CBCT). Methods: We investigated a method to derive multiple 4D Parametric Imaging (PI) maps using only one CBCT acquisition. During this procedure a 3D-DSA geometry is stored and used subsequently for all 4D images. Each time a biplane DSA is acquired, we calculate 2D parametric maps of Bolus Arrival Time (BAT), Mean Transit Time (MTT) and Time to Peak (TTP). Arterial segments which are nearly parallel with one of the biplane imaging planes in the 2D parametric maps are co-registered with the 3D geometry. The values in the remaining vascular network are found using spline interpolation since the points chosen for co-registration on the vasculature are discrete and remaining regions need to be interpolated. To evaluate the method we used a patient CT volume data set for 3D printing a neurovascular phantom containing a complete Circle of Willis. We connected the phantom to a flow loop with a peristaltic pump, simulating physiological flow conditions. Contrast media was injected with an automatic injector at 10 ml/sec. Images were acquired with a Toshiba Infinix C-arm and 4D parametric imagemore » maps of the vasculature were calculated. Results: 4D BAT, MTT, and TTP parametric image maps of the Circle of Willis were derived. We generated color-coded 3D geometries which avoided artifacts due to vessel overlap or foreshortening in the projection direction. Conclusion: The software was tested successfully and multiple 4D parametric images were obtained from biplane DSA sequences without the need to acquire additional 3D-DSA runs. This can benefit the patient by reducing the contrast media and the radiation dose normally associated with these procedures. Partial support from NIH Grant R01-EB002873 and Toshiba Medical Systems Corp.« less

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. Toshiba Stroke and Vascular Research Centre, SUNY at Buffalo (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22654071
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; BLOOD VESSELS; COMPUTER CODES; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; CONTRAST MEDIA; IMAGES; RADIATION DOSES

Citation Formats

Balasubramoniam, A, Bednarek, D, Rudin, S, and Ionita, C. TU-H-CAMPUS-IeP3-02: Neurovascular 4D Parametric Imaging Using Co-Registration of Biplane DSA Sequences with 3D Vascular Geometry Obtained From Cone Beam CT. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4957695.
Balasubramoniam, A, Bednarek, D, Rudin, S, & Ionita, C. TU-H-CAMPUS-IeP3-02: Neurovascular 4D Parametric Imaging Using Co-Registration of Biplane DSA Sequences with 3D Vascular Geometry Obtained From Cone Beam CT. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957695.
Balasubramoniam, A, Bednarek, D, Rudin, S, and Ionita, C. 2016. "TU-H-CAMPUS-IeP3-02: Neurovascular 4D Parametric Imaging Using Co-Registration of Biplane DSA Sequences with 3D Vascular Geometry Obtained From Cone Beam CT". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957695.
@article{osti_22654071,
title = {TU-H-CAMPUS-IeP3-02: Neurovascular 4D Parametric Imaging Using Co-Registration of Biplane DSA Sequences with 3D Vascular Geometry Obtained From Cone Beam CT},
author = {Balasubramoniam, A and Bednarek, D and Rudin, S and Ionita, C},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To create 4D parametric images using biplane Digital Subtraction Angiography (DSA) sequences co-registered with the 3D vascular geometry obtained from Cone Beam-CT (CBCT). Methods: We investigated a method to derive multiple 4D Parametric Imaging (PI) maps using only one CBCT acquisition. During this procedure a 3D-DSA geometry is stored and used subsequently for all 4D images. Each time a biplane DSA is acquired, we calculate 2D parametric maps of Bolus Arrival Time (BAT), Mean Transit Time (MTT) and Time to Peak (TTP). Arterial segments which are nearly parallel with one of the biplane imaging planes in the 2D parametric maps are co-registered with the 3D geometry. The values in the remaining vascular network are found using spline interpolation since the points chosen for co-registration on the vasculature are discrete and remaining regions need to be interpolated. To evaluate the method we used a patient CT volume data set for 3D printing a neurovascular phantom containing a complete Circle of Willis. We connected the phantom to a flow loop with a peristaltic pump, simulating physiological flow conditions. Contrast media was injected with an automatic injector at 10 ml/sec. Images were acquired with a Toshiba Infinix C-arm and 4D parametric image maps of the vasculature were calculated. Results: 4D BAT, MTT, and TTP parametric image maps of the Circle of Willis were derived. We generated color-coded 3D geometries which avoided artifacts due to vessel overlap or foreshortening in the projection direction. Conclusion: The software was tested successfully and multiple 4D parametric images were obtained from biplane DSA sequences without the need to acquire additional 3D-DSA runs. This can benefit the patient by reducing the contrast media and the radiation dose normally associated with these procedures. Partial support from NIH Grant R01-EB002873 and Toshiba Medical Systems Corp.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4957695},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
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