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Title: TU-H-CAMPUS-IeP2-01: Quantitative Evaluation of PROPELLER DWI Using QIBA Diffusion Phantom

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this study is to determine the quantitative variability of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values when varying imaging parameters in a diffusion-weighted (DW) fast spin echo (FSE) sequence with Periodically Rotated Overlapping ParallEL Lines with Enhanced Reconstruction (PROPELLER) k-space trajectory. Methods: Using a 3T MRI scanner, a NIST traceable, quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) diffusion phantom (High Precision Devices, Inc, Boulder, Colorado) consisting of 13 vials filled with various concentrations of polymer polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) in aqueous solution was imaged with a standard Quantitative Imaging Biomarkers Alliance (QIBA) DWI spin echo, echo planar imaging (SE EPI) acquisition. The same phantom was then imaged with a DWI PROPELLER sequence at varying echo train lengths (ETL) of 8, 20, and 32, as well as b-values of 400, 900, and 2000. QIBA DWI phantom analysis software was used to generate ADC maps and create region of interests (ROIs) for quantitative measurements of each vial. Mean and standard deviations of the ROIs were compared. Results: The SE EPI sequence generated ADC values that showed very good agreement with the known ADC values of the phantom (r2 = 0.9995, slope = 1.0061). The ADC values measured from the PROPELLER sequences were inflated, butmore » were highly correlated with an r2 range from 0.8754 to 0.9880. The PROPELLER sequence with an ETL=20 and b-value of 0 and 2000 showed the closest agreement (r2 = 0.9034, slope = 0.9880). Conclusion: The DW PROPELLER sequence is promising for quantitative evaluation of ADC values. A drawback of the PROPELLER sequence is the longer acquisition time. The 180° refocusing pulses may also cause the observed increase in ADC values compared to the standard SE EPI DW sequence. However, the FSE sequence offers an advantage with in-plane motion and geometric distortion which will be investigated in future studies.« less

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22654057
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS; BIOLOGICAL MARKERS; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; COMPUTER CODES; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; DIFFUSION; IMAGES; NMR IMAGING; PHANTOMS; SPIN ECHO

Citation Formats

Yung, J, Ai, H, Liu, H, and Stafford, R. TU-H-CAMPUS-IeP2-01: Quantitative Evaluation of PROPELLER DWI Using QIBA Diffusion Phantom. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4957679.
Yung, J, Ai, H, Liu, H, & Stafford, R. TU-H-CAMPUS-IeP2-01: Quantitative Evaluation of PROPELLER DWI Using QIBA Diffusion Phantom. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957679.
Yung, J, Ai, H, Liu, H, and Stafford, R. 2016. "TU-H-CAMPUS-IeP2-01: Quantitative Evaluation of PROPELLER DWI Using QIBA Diffusion Phantom". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957679.
@article{osti_22654057,
title = {TU-H-CAMPUS-IeP2-01: Quantitative Evaluation of PROPELLER DWI Using QIBA Diffusion Phantom},
author = {Yung, J and Ai, H and Liu, H and Stafford, R},
abstractNote = {Purpose: The purpose of this study is to determine the quantitative variability of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values when varying imaging parameters in a diffusion-weighted (DW) fast spin echo (FSE) sequence with Periodically Rotated Overlapping ParallEL Lines with Enhanced Reconstruction (PROPELLER) k-space trajectory. Methods: Using a 3T MRI scanner, a NIST traceable, quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) diffusion phantom (High Precision Devices, Inc, Boulder, Colorado) consisting of 13 vials filled with various concentrations of polymer polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) in aqueous solution was imaged with a standard Quantitative Imaging Biomarkers Alliance (QIBA) DWI spin echo, echo planar imaging (SE EPI) acquisition. The same phantom was then imaged with a DWI PROPELLER sequence at varying echo train lengths (ETL) of 8, 20, and 32, as well as b-values of 400, 900, and 2000. QIBA DWI phantom analysis software was used to generate ADC maps and create region of interests (ROIs) for quantitative measurements of each vial. Mean and standard deviations of the ROIs were compared. Results: The SE EPI sequence generated ADC values that showed very good agreement with the known ADC values of the phantom (r2 = 0.9995, slope = 1.0061). The ADC values measured from the PROPELLER sequences were inflated, but were highly correlated with an r2 range from 0.8754 to 0.9880. The PROPELLER sequence with an ETL=20 and b-value of 0 and 2000 showed the closest agreement (r2 = 0.9034, slope = 0.9880). Conclusion: The DW PROPELLER sequence is promising for quantitative evaluation of ADC values. A drawback of the PROPELLER sequence is the longer acquisition time. The 180° refocusing pulses may also cause the observed increase in ADC values compared to the standard SE EPI DW sequence. However, the FSE sequence offers an advantage with in-plane motion and geometric distortion which will be investigated in future studies.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4957679},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: To validate Computed Tomography Fractional Flow Reserve (CT-FFR) measurements with accurate 3D printed coronary phantoms. Methods: DICOM data from four phases in two patients imaged with a standard 320 × 0.5mm coronary CT acquisition (70–80% cardiac cycle) underwent semi-automated segmentation using a research workstation. Both patients had a >50% stenosis from the clinical image interpretation. Each volume was saved as a Stereo Lithographic (STL) file with 250 micron resolution. The 3D geometries were qualitatively assessed; the best of the four phases was 3D printed using a Stratasys Eden260V printer in Tango+, a rubber-like material that roughly emulates mechanical propertiesmore » of human vasculature. We connected the model to a programmable pump and measured the pressure drop using pressure sensors embedded proximal and distal to the arterial stenosis. Next, the STL files used for the 3D printed models were uploaded in the ANSYS meshing tool (ICEM CFD 16.1). A standard meshing process was applied and the meshed geometry was directly imported in the ANSYS Fluent for Computational Flow Dynamics simulations. The CFD simulations were used to calculate the CT-FFR and compared to the bench top FFR measured in the 3D printed phantoms. Results: FFR-CT measurements and phantoms were completed in within an hour after the segmentation. Patient 1 had a 60% stenosis that resulted in a CT-FFR of 0.68. The second case had a 50% stenosis and a CT-FFR of 0.75. The average bench top FFR measurements were 0.72 and 0.80, respectively. Conclusion: This pilot investigation demonstrated the use of a bench-top coronary model for CT-FFR validation. The measurements and the CFD simulations agreed within 6%. Project supported by Support: Toshiba America Medical Systems Corp.and NIH grant R01-EB002873. Project supported by Toshiba America Medical Systems Corp.and partial support from NIH grant R01-EB002873.« less
  • Purpose: To characterize and compare the longitudinal reproducibility of diffusion imaging data acquired with four different protocols using a phantom. Methods: The Diffusive Quantitative Imaging Phantom (DQIP) was constructed using fifteen cylindrical compartments within a larger compartment, filled with deionized water doped with CuSO4 and NaCl. The smaller compartments contained arrays of hexagonal or cylindrical glass capillaries of varying inner diameters, for differing restraint of water diffusion. The sensitivity of diffusion imaging metrics to signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was probed by doping compartments with differing ratios of deuterium oxide to H2O. A cork phantom enclosure was constructed to increase thermal stabilitymore » during scanning and a cork holder was made to reproduce scanner positioning. Four different protocols of DWI (diffusion weighted imaging) and DTI (Diffusion tensor imaging) imaging were assembled on a GE Excite HDx 3.0T MRI scanner to collect imaging data over 9-10 days. Data was processed with in-house software created in Matlab to obtain fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values. Results: All DTI and DWI sequences showed good longitudinal stability of mean FA and ADC values per compartment, exhibiting low standard deviation ∼9%. A t-test was performed to compare mean FA values from the DTI clinical protocol to those of the DTI special protocol, indicating significantly different values in the majority of compartments. ANOVA performed on ADC values for all DTI and DWI sequences also showed significantly different values in a majority of compartments. Conclusion: This work has the potential for quantifying systemic variations between diffusion imaging sequences from different platforms. Characterization of DWI and DTI performance were done over four sequences with predictable results. This data suggests that the DQIP phantom may be a reliable method of monitoring day-to-day and scan-to-scan variation in diffusion imaging sequences from different platforms. Schott Glass North America and The Phantom Laboratory have donated materials and personnel time to this project.« less
  • Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of using classic textural feature extraction in radiotherapy response assessment, we studied a unique cohort of early stage breast cancer patients with paired pre - and post-radiation Diffusion Weighted MRI (DWI-MRI) and Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI). Methods: 15 female patients from our prospective phase I trial evaluating preoperative radiotherapy were included in this retrospective study. Each patient received a single-fraction radiation treatment, and DWI and DCE scans were conducted before and after the radiotherapy. DWI scans were acquired using a spin-echo EPI sequence with diffusion weighting factors of b = 0 and b =more » 500 mm{sup 2} /s, and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps were calculated. DCE-MRI scans were acquired using a T{sub 1}-weighted 3D SPGR sequence with a temporal resolution of about 1 minute. The contrast agent (CA) was intravenously injected with a 0.1 mmol/kg bodyweight dose at 2 ml/s. Two parameters, volume transfer constant (K{sup trans} ) and k{sub ep} were analyzed using the two-compartment Tofts kinetic model. For DCE parametric maps and ADC maps, 33 textural features were generated from the clinical target volume (CTV) in a 3D fashion using the classic gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCOM) and gray level run length matrix (GLRLM). Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to determine the significance of each texture feature’s change after the radiotherapy. The significance was set to 0.05 with Bonferroni correction. Results: For ADC maps calculated from DWI-MRI, 24 out of 33 CTV features changed significantly after the radiotherapy. For DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters, all 33 CTV features of K{sup trans} and 33 features of k{sub ep} changed significantly. Conclusion: Initial results indicate that those significantly changed classic texture features are sensitive to radiation-induced changes and can be used for assessment of radiotherapy response in breast cancer.« less
  • Purpose: Advanced dosimetry in CT (e.g. the Monte Carlo method) requires an accurate characterization of the shaped filter and radiation quality used during a scan. The purpose of this work was to develop a method where half value layer (HVL) profiles along shaped filters could be made. From the HVL profiles the beam shaping properties and effective photon spectrum for a particular scan can be inferred. Methods: A measurement rig was developed to allow determinations of the HVL under a scatter-free narrow-beam geometry and constant focal spot to ionization chamber distance for different fan angles. For each fan angle themore » HVL is obtained by fitting the transmission of radiation through different thicknesses of an Al absorber (type 1100) using an appropriate model. The effective Al thickness of shaped filters and effective photon spectra are estimated using a model of photon emission from a Tungsten anode. This method is used to obtain the effective photon spectra and effective Al thickness of shaped filters for a CT scanner recently introduced to the market. Results: This study resulted in a set of effective photon spectra (central ray) for each kVp along with effective Al thicknesses of the different shaped filters. The effective photon spectra and effective Al thicknesses of shaped filters were used to obtain numerically approximated HVL profiles and compared to measured HVL profiles (mean absolute percentage error = 0.02). The central axis HVL found in the vendor’s technical documentation were compared to approximated HVL values (mean absolute percentage error = 0.03). Conclusion: This work has resulted in a unique method of measuring HVL profiles along shaped filters in CT. Further the effective photon spectra and the effective Al thicknesses of shaped filters that were obtained can be incorporated into Monte Carlo simulations.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of size-specific dose estimates (SSDE) in CT in the presence of simulated metal prostheses. Methods: Radiation dose in tissue (f-factor = 0.94) was measured at various chamber positions in a conventional nested CTDI phantom with nominal 0.5 inch metal rods inserted to simulate the presence of prosthetic implant(s). An average weighted tissue dose (AWTD) was calculated in a manner similar to CTDIw. Subsequent scans were performed with varying phantom diameter, number of metal rods and type of metal. The scan acquisition parameters were fixed for all such measurements (i.e. CTDIvol was constant). Axial CT imagesmore » reconstructed both with and without a metal artifact reduction algorithm (SEMAR) were used to calculate the water-equivalent diameter (Dw) per AAPM TG Report 220. The Dw values were subsequently used to determine the SSDE from the known CTDIvol. In addition SSDE was also calculated from the effective diameter per AAPM TG Report 204. Accuracy of the calculated SSDE values were assessed by comparing to the AWTD measurements. Results: In the 32-cm diameter phantom the SSDE calculations from Dw (TG-220) were within ±1% of the AWTD measurements regardless of type of metal and number of metal rods while SSDE calculated from effective diameter (TG-204) overestimated the AWTD by 7–10%. In the 16-cm diameter phantom the SSDE calculations from Dw (TG-220) were within ±4% of the AWTD measurement. The Dw calculations used to determine SSDE varied by less than 0.2% between the images reconstructed with and without the metal artifact reduction algorithm. Conclusion: The TG-220 SSDE method can provide an accurate estimation of tissue dose in the presence of metal while TG-204 SSDE method overestimates the dose. The determination of Dw is independent of reconstruction algorithm.« less