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Title: TU-H-CAMPUS-IeP2-01: Quantitative Evaluation of PROPELLER DWI Using QIBA Diffusion Phantom

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this study is to determine the quantitative variability of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values when varying imaging parameters in a diffusion-weighted (DW) fast spin echo (FSE) sequence with Periodically Rotated Overlapping ParallEL Lines with Enhanced Reconstruction (PROPELLER) k-space trajectory. Methods: Using a 3T MRI scanner, a NIST traceable, quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) diffusion phantom (High Precision Devices, Inc, Boulder, Colorado) consisting of 13 vials filled with various concentrations of polymer polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) in aqueous solution was imaged with a standard Quantitative Imaging Biomarkers Alliance (QIBA) DWI spin echo, echo planar imaging (SE EPI) acquisition. The same phantom was then imaged with a DWI PROPELLER sequence at varying echo train lengths (ETL) of 8, 20, and 32, as well as b-values of 400, 900, and 2000. QIBA DWI phantom analysis software was used to generate ADC maps and create region of interests (ROIs) for quantitative measurements of each vial. Mean and standard deviations of the ROIs were compared. Results: The SE EPI sequence generated ADC values that showed very good agreement with the known ADC values of the phantom (r2 = 0.9995, slope = 1.0061). The ADC values measured from the PROPELLER sequences were inflated, butmore » were highly correlated with an r2 range from 0.8754 to 0.9880. The PROPELLER sequence with an ETL=20 and b-value of 0 and 2000 showed the closest agreement (r2 = 0.9034, slope = 0.9880). Conclusion: The DW PROPELLER sequence is promising for quantitative evaluation of ADC values. A drawback of the PROPELLER sequence is the longer acquisition time. The 180° refocusing pulses may also cause the observed increase in ADC values compared to the standard SE EPI DW sequence. However, the FSE sequence offers an advantage with in-plane motion and geometric distortion which will be investigated in future studies.« less

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22654057
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS; BIOLOGICAL MARKERS; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; COMPUTER CODES; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; DIFFUSION; IMAGES; NMR IMAGING; PHANTOMS; SPIN ECHO

Citation Formats

Yung, J, Ai, H, Liu, H, and Stafford, R. TU-H-CAMPUS-IeP2-01: Quantitative Evaluation of PROPELLER DWI Using QIBA Diffusion Phantom. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4957679.
Yung, J, Ai, H, Liu, H, & Stafford, R. TU-H-CAMPUS-IeP2-01: Quantitative Evaluation of PROPELLER DWI Using QIBA Diffusion Phantom. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957679.
Yung, J, Ai, H, Liu, H, and Stafford, R. Wed . "TU-H-CAMPUS-IeP2-01: Quantitative Evaluation of PROPELLER DWI Using QIBA Diffusion Phantom". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957679.
@article{osti_22654057,
title = {TU-H-CAMPUS-IeP2-01: Quantitative Evaluation of PROPELLER DWI Using QIBA Diffusion Phantom},
author = {Yung, J and Ai, H and Liu, H and Stafford, R},
abstractNote = {Purpose: The purpose of this study is to determine the quantitative variability of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values when varying imaging parameters in a diffusion-weighted (DW) fast spin echo (FSE) sequence with Periodically Rotated Overlapping ParallEL Lines with Enhanced Reconstruction (PROPELLER) k-space trajectory. Methods: Using a 3T MRI scanner, a NIST traceable, quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) diffusion phantom (High Precision Devices, Inc, Boulder, Colorado) consisting of 13 vials filled with various concentrations of polymer polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) in aqueous solution was imaged with a standard Quantitative Imaging Biomarkers Alliance (QIBA) DWI spin echo, echo planar imaging (SE EPI) acquisition. The same phantom was then imaged with a DWI PROPELLER sequence at varying echo train lengths (ETL) of 8, 20, and 32, as well as b-values of 400, 900, and 2000. QIBA DWI phantom analysis software was used to generate ADC maps and create region of interests (ROIs) for quantitative measurements of each vial. Mean and standard deviations of the ROIs were compared. Results: The SE EPI sequence generated ADC values that showed very good agreement with the known ADC values of the phantom (r2 = 0.9995, slope = 1.0061). The ADC values measured from the PROPELLER sequences were inflated, but were highly correlated with an r2 range from 0.8754 to 0.9880. The PROPELLER sequence with an ETL=20 and b-value of 0 and 2000 showed the closest agreement (r2 = 0.9034, slope = 0.9880). Conclusion: The DW PROPELLER sequence is promising for quantitative evaluation of ADC values. A drawback of the PROPELLER sequence is the longer acquisition time. The 180° refocusing pulses may also cause the observed increase in ADC values compared to the standard SE EPI DW sequence. However, the FSE sequence offers an advantage with in-plane motion and geometric distortion which will be investigated in future studies.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4957679},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
  • Purpose: To validate Computed Tomography Fractional Flow Reserve (CT-FFR) measurements with accurate 3D printed coronary phantoms. Methods: DICOM data from four phases in two patients imaged with a standard 320 × 0.5mm coronary CT acquisition (70–80% cardiac cycle) underwent semi-automated segmentation using a research workstation. Both patients had a >50% stenosis from the clinical image interpretation. Each volume was saved as a Stereo Lithographic (STL) file with 250 micron resolution. The 3D geometries were qualitatively assessed; the best of the four phases was 3D printed using a Stratasys Eden260V printer in Tango+, a rubber-like material that roughly emulates mechanical propertiesmore » of human vasculature. We connected the model to a programmable pump and measured the pressure drop using pressure sensors embedded proximal and distal to the arterial stenosis. Next, the STL files used for the 3D printed models were uploaded in the ANSYS meshing tool (ICEM CFD 16.1). A standard meshing process was applied and the meshed geometry was directly imported in the ANSYS Fluent for Computational Flow Dynamics simulations. The CFD simulations were used to calculate the CT-FFR and compared to the bench top FFR measured in the 3D printed phantoms. Results: FFR-CT measurements and phantoms were completed in within an hour after the segmentation. Patient 1 had a 60% stenosis that resulted in a CT-FFR of 0.68. The second case had a 50% stenosis and a CT-FFR of 0.75. The average bench top FFR measurements were 0.72 and 0.80, respectively. Conclusion: This pilot investigation demonstrated the use of a bench-top coronary model for CT-FFR validation. The measurements and the CFD simulations agreed within 6%. Project supported by Support: Toshiba America Medical Systems Corp.and NIH grant R01-EB002873. Project supported by Toshiba America Medical Systems Corp.and partial support from NIH grant R01-EB002873.« less
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