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Title: TU-H-BRA-02: The Physics of Magnetic Field Isolation in a Novel Compact Linear Accelerator Based MRI-Guided Radiation Therapy System

Abstract

Purpose: To develop a method for isolating the MRI magnetic field from field-sensitive linear accelerator components at distances close to isocenter. Methods: A MRI-guided radiation therapy system has been designed that integrates a linear accelerator with simultaneous MR imaging. In order to accomplish this, the magnetron, port circulator, radiofrequency waveguide, gun driver, and linear accelerator needed to be placed in locations with low magnetic fields. The system was also required to be compact, so moving these components far from the main magnetic field and isocenter was not an option. The magnetic field sensitive components (exclusive of the waveguide) were placed in coaxial steel sleeves that were electrically and mechanically isolated and whose thickness and placement were optimized using E&M modeling software. Six sets of sleeves were placed 60° apart, 85 cm from isocenter. The Faraday effect occurs when the direction of propagation is parallel to the magnetic RF field component, rotating the RF polarization, subsequently diminishing RF power. The Faraday effect was avoided by orienting the waveguides such that the magnetic field RF component was parallel to the magnetic field. Results: The magnetic field within the shields was measured to be less than 40 Gauss, significantly below the amount neededmore » for the magnetron and port circulator. Additional mu-metal was employed to reduce the magnetic field at the linear accelerator to less than 1 Gauss. The orientation of the RF waveguides allowed the RT transport with minimal loss and reflection. Conclusion: One of the major challenges in designing a compact linear accelerator based MRI-guided radiation therapy system, that of creating low magnetic field environments for the magnetic-field sensitive components, has been solved. The measured magnetic fields are sufficiently small to enable system integration. This work supported by ViewRay, Inc.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2]; ; ; ; ;  [3]
  1. UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States)
  2. Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO (United States)
  3. ViewRay, Inc., Oakwood Village, OH (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22654025
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; COMPUTER CODES; LINEAR ACCELERATORS; MAGNETIC FIELDS; NMR IMAGING; RADIOTHERAPY; RADIOWAVE RADIATION

Citation Formats

Low, D, Mutic, S, Shvartsman, S, Chmielewski, T, Fought, G, Sharma, A, and Dempsey, J. TU-H-BRA-02: The Physics of Magnetic Field Isolation in a Novel Compact Linear Accelerator Based MRI-Guided Radiation Therapy System. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4957624.
Low, D, Mutic, S, Shvartsman, S, Chmielewski, T, Fought, G, Sharma, A, & Dempsey, J. TU-H-BRA-02: The Physics of Magnetic Field Isolation in a Novel Compact Linear Accelerator Based MRI-Guided Radiation Therapy System. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957624.
Low, D, Mutic, S, Shvartsman, S, Chmielewski, T, Fought, G, Sharma, A, and Dempsey, J. Wed . "TU-H-BRA-02: The Physics of Magnetic Field Isolation in a Novel Compact Linear Accelerator Based MRI-Guided Radiation Therapy System". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957624.
@article{osti_22654025,
title = {TU-H-BRA-02: The Physics of Magnetic Field Isolation in a Novel Compact Linear Accelerator Based MRI-Guided Radiation Therapy System},
author = {Low, D and Mutic, S and Shvartsman, S and Chmielewski, T and Fought, G and Sharma, A and Dempsey, J},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To develop a method for isolating the MRI magnetic field from field-sensitive linear accelerator components at distances close to isocenter. Methods: A MRI-guided radiation therapy system has been designed that integrates a linear accelerator with simultaneous MR imaging. In order to accomplish this, the magnetron, port circulator, radiofrequency waveguide, gun driver, and linear accelerator needed to be placed in locations with low magnetic fields. The system was also required to be compact, so moving these components far from the main magnetic field and isocenter was not an option. The magnetic field sensitive components (exclusive of the waveguide) were placed in coaxial steel sleeves that were electrically and mechanically isolated and whose thickness and placement were optimized using E&M modeling software. Six sets of sleeves were placed 60° apart, 85 cm from isocenter. The Faraday effect occurs when the direction of propagation is parallel to the magnetic RF field component, rotating the RF polarization, subsequently diminishing RF power. The Faraday effect was avoided by orienting the waveguides such that the magnetic field RF component was parallel to the magnetic field. Results: The magnetic field within the shields was measured to be less than 40 Gauss, significantly below the amount needed for the magnetron and port circulator. Additional mu-metal was employed to reduce the magnetic field at the linear accelerator to less than 1 Gauss. The orientation of the RF waveguides allowed the RT transport with minimal loss and reflection. Conclusion: One of the major challenges in designing a compact linear accelerator based MRI-guided radiation therapy system, that of creating low magnetic field environments for the magnetic-field sensitive components, has been solved. The measured magnetic fields are sufficiently small to enable system integration. This work supported by ViewRay, Inc.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4957624},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
  • Purpose: To develop a method for isolating the radiofrequency waves emanating from linear accelerator components from the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system of an integrated MRI-linac. Methods: An MRI-guided radiation therapy system has been designed that integrates a linear accelerator with simultaneous MR imaging. The radiofrequency waves created by the accelerating process would degrade MR image quality, so a method for containing the radiofrequency waves and isolating the MR imager from them was developed. The linear accelerator radiofrequency modulator was placed outside the room, so a filter was designed to eliminate the radiofrequency corresponding to the proton Larmour frequency ofmore » 14.7 MHz. Placing the radiofrequency emitting components in a typical Faraday cage would have reduced the radiofrequency emissions, but the design would be susceptible to small gaps in the shield due to the efficiency of the Faraday cage reflecting internal radiofrequency emissions. To reduce internal radiofrequency reflections, the Faraday cage was lined with carbon fiber sheets. Carbon fiber has the property of attenuating the radiofrequency energy so that the overall radiofrequency field inside the Faraday cage is reduced, decreasing any radiofrequency energy emitted from small gaps in the cage walls. Results: Within a 1.2 MHz band centered on the Larmor frequency, the radiofrequency (RF) leakage from the Faraday cage was measured to be −90 dB with no RF on, −40 dB with the RF on and no shield, returning to −90 dB with the RF on and shields in place. The radiofrequency filter attenuated the linear accelerator modulator emissions in the 14.7 MHz band by 70 dB. Conclusions: One of the major challenges in designing a compact linear accelerator based MRI-guided radiation therapy system, that of isolating the high power RF system from the MRI, has been solved. The measured radiofrequency emissions are sufficiently small to enable system integration. This research was funded by ViewRay, Inc., Oakwood, OH.« less
  • Purpose: To describe the design and characteristics of a novel linac-based MRI guided radiation therapy system that addresses RF and magnetic field interference and that can be housed in conventional radiotherapy vaults. Methods: The MR-IGRT system will provide simultaneous MR imaging combined with both simple (3D) and complex (IMRT, SBRT, SRS) techniques. The system is a combination of a) double-donut split solenoidal superconducting 0.345T MRI; and b) a 90 cm isocenter ring-gantry mounted 6MV, flattening filter-free linac coupled with a stacked doubly-focused multileaf collimator with 4 mm resolution. A novel RF shielding and absorption technology was developed to isolate themore » beam generating RF emissions from the MR, while a novel magnetic shielding sleeve system was developed to place the magnetic field-sensitive components in low-magnetic field regions. The system design produces high spatial resolution radiation beams with state-of-the art radiation dose characteristics and simultaneous MR imaging. Results: Prototype testing with a spectrum analyzer has demonstrated complete elimination of linac RF inside the treatment room. The magnetic field inside of the magnetic shielding was well below the specification, allowing the linear accelerator to operate normally. A novel on-gantry shimming system maintained < 25 ppm magnetic field homogeneity over a 45 cm spherical field of view for all gantry angles. Conclusion: The system design demonstrates the feasibility coupling a state-of-the art linac system with a 0.345T MRI, enabling highly conformal radiation therapy with simultaneous MR image guidance. S. Mutic’s employer (Washington University) has grant with ViewRay; D. Low is former ViewRay scientific advisory board member (ended October 2015); T. Chmielewski, G. Fought, M. Hernandez, I. Kawrakow, A. Sharma, S. Shvartsman, J. Dempsey are employees of ViewRay with stock options (Dempsey has leadership role and Dempsey/Kawrakow have stock).« less
  • Purpose: To describe the performance of a linear accelerator operating in a compact MRI-guided radiation therapy system. Methods: A commercial linear accelerator was placed in an MRI unit that is employed in a commercial MR-based image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) system. The linear accelerator components were placed within magnetic field-reducing hardware that provided magnetic fields of less than 40 G for the magnetron, gun driver, and port circulator, with 1 G for the linear accelerator. The system did not employ a flattening filter. The test linear accelerator was an industrial 4 MV model that was employed to test the abilitymore » to run an accelerator in the MR environment. An MR-compatible diode detector array was used to measure the beam profiles with the accelerator outside and inside the MR field and with the gradient coils on and off to examine if there was any effect on the delivered dose distribution. The beam profiles and time characteristics of the beam were measured. Results: The beam profiles exhibited characteristic unflattened Bremsstrahlung features with less than ±1.5% differences in the profile magnitude when the system was outside and inside the magnet and less than 1% differences with the gradient coils on and off. The central axis dose rate fluctuated by less than 1% over a 30 second period when outside and inside the MRI. Conclusion: A linaccompatible MR design has been shown to be effective in not perturbing the operation of a commercial linear accelerator. While the accelerator used in the tests was 4MV, there is nothing fundamentally different with the operation of a 6MV unit, implying that the design will enable operation of the proposed clinical unit. Research funding provided by ViewRay, Inc.« less
  • Purpose: MRI is a highly desirable modality to guide radiation therapy but it is difficult to combine a conventional MRI scanner directly with a linear accelerator (linac). An interior MRI (iMRI) concept has been proposed to acquire MRI images within a small field of view only covering targets and immediate surrounding tissues. The objective of this project is to design an interior MRI system to work with a linac using a magnet to provide a field around 0.2T in a cube of 20cm per side, and perform image reconstruction with a slightly inhomogeneous static magnetic fields. Methods: All the resultsmore » are simulated using a commercially available software package, FARADY. In our design, a ring structure holds the iMRI system and also imbeds a linac treatment head. The ring is synchronized to the linac gantry rotation. Half of the ring is made of steel and becomes a magnetic flux return path (yoke) so that a strong magnetic field will be limited inside the iron circuit and fringe fields will be very weak. In order to increase the static magnetic field homogeneity, special steel magnet boots or tips were simulated. Three curved boots were designed based on two-dimensional curves: arc, parabola and hyperbola. Results: Different boot surfaces modify magnetic field distributions differently. With the same pair of neodymium-iron-boron (NdFeB) magnets, the magnetic induction at the centers are 0.217T, 0.201T, 0.204T, and 0.212T for flat, arc, parabola and hyperbola boots, respectively. The hyperbola boots lead to the most homogeneous results, the static magnetic field deviations are within 0.5% in a cube of 20cm, and can be further improved using shimming techniques. Conclusion: This study supports the concept of an iMRI design. Successful development of iMRI will provide crucial information for tumor delineation in radiation therapy.« less
  • Purpose: To compare depth-dose and surface-dose measurements without and with the magnetic field in a 0.3T MR image-guided Co-60 treatment unit using MOSFET dosimeters. Methods: MOSFET dosimeters (Best Medical Canada, model TN-502RDH-10) were placed in a solid water phantom at 5cm depth with 8cm backscatter (with the MOSFET wires in different orientations to the couch long axis) and also on the surface of an 8cm solid water phantom. The phantoms were placed in an MR image-guided Co-60 treatment machine at an SAD of 105cm to the MOSFETs. Dose measurements were performed between 50 and 200cGy at 5cm depth in amore » 10.5cm × 10.5cm radiation field without the magnetic field (during a machine maintenance period) and with the nominal magnetic field of 0.3T. The dose linearity was measured at 5cm depth with an orthogonal field and the angular dose dependence was measured on the surface with an orthogonal field and oblique fields at +60 degrees and −60 degrees. Results: The measured MOSFET readings at 5cm depth were linear with dose with slopes of (2.97 +/− 0.01) mV/cGy and (3.01 +/− 0.02) mV/cGy without and with the magnetic field, respectively. No statistically significant difference was found. The surface dose measurements, however, were lower by 6.4% for the AP field (2.3 σ) with magnetic field, 4.9% for the −60 degree field (1.4 σ), and 0.4% different for the +60 degree field (0.2 σ). Conclusion: There is no statistically significant difference in the dose at depth without and with the magnetic field and different orientations of the MOSFET wires. There is a statistically significant difference for the surface dose due to the influence of the magnetic field on secondary electrons from head-scatter and the build-up region in certain field orientations. Clinical surface-dose dosimetry in a magnetic field should apply asymmetric angle-dependent corrections.« less