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Title: TU-H-BRC-07: Therapeutic Benefit in Spatially Fractionated Radiotherapy (GRID) Using Helical Tomotherapy

Abstract

Purpose: The aim of this project is to study the therapeutic ratio (TR) for helical Tomotherapy (HT) based spatially fractionated radiotherapy (GRID). Estimation of TR was based on the linear-quadratic cell survival model by comparing the normal cell survival in a HT GRID to that of a uniform dose delivery in an open-field for the same tumor survival. Methods: HT GRID plan was generated using a patient specific virtual GRID block pattern of non-divergent, cylinder shaped holes using MLCs. TR was defined as the ratio of normal tissue surviving fraction (SF) under HT GRID irradiation to an open field irradiation with an equivalent dose that result in the same tumor cell SF. The ratio was estimated from DVH data on ten patient plans with deep seated, bulky tumor approved by the treating radiation oncologist. Dependence of the TR values on radio-sensitivity of the tumor cells and prescription dose were also analyzed. Results: The mean ± standard deviation (SD) of TR was 4.0±0.7 (range: 3.1 to 5.5) for the 10 patients with single fraction dose of 20 Gy and tumor cell SF of 0.5 at 2 Gy. In addition, mean±SD of TR = 1±0.1 and 18.0±5.1 were found for tumor withmore » SF of 0.3 and 0.7, respectively. Reducing the prescription dose to 15 and 10 Gy lowered the TR to 2.0±0.2 and 1.2±0.04 for a tumor cell SF of 0.5 at 2 Gy. In this study, the SF of normal cells was assumed to be 0.5 at 2 Gy. Conclusion: HT GRID displayed a significant therapeutic advantage over uniform dose from an open field irradiation. TR increases with the radioresistance of the tumor cells and with prescription dose.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;  [1];  [2];  [3];  [1];  [3]
  1. Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR (United States)
  2. Comprehensive Cancer Center of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States)
  3. (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22654021
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; CT-GUIDED RADIOTHERAPY; DOSE EQUIVALENTS; GRIDS; HIGH-TC SUPERCONDUCTORS; IRRADIATION; NEOPLASMS; PATIENTS; TUMOR CELLS

Citation Formats

Narayanasamy, G, Zhang, X, Paudel, N, Morrill, S, Maraboyina, S, Peacock, L, Penagaricano, J, Meigooni, A, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Nevada Las Vegas, NV, Liang, X, and University of Florida Health Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL. TU-H-BRC-07: Therapeutic Benefit in Spatially Fractionated Radiotherapy (GRID) Using Helical Tomotherapy. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4957614.
Narayanasamy, G, Zhang, X, Paudel, N, Morrill, S, Maraboyina, S, Peacock, L, Penagaricano, J, Meigooni, A, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Nevada Las Vegas, NV, Liang, X, & University of Florida Health Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL. TU-H-BRC-07: Therapeutic Benefit in Spatially Fractionated Radiotherapy (GRID) Using Helical Tomotherapy. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957614.
Narayanasamy, G, Zhang, X, Paudel, N, Morrill, S, Maraboyina, S, Peacock, L, Penagaricano, J, Meigooni, A, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Nevada Las Vegas, NV, Liang, X, and University of Florida Health Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL. 2016. "TU-H-BRC-07: Therapeutic Benefit in Spatially Fractionated Radiotherapy (GRID) Using Helical Tomotherapy". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957614.
@article{osti_22654021,
title = {TU-H-BRC-07: Therapeutic Benefit in Spatially Fractionated Radiotherapy (GRID) Using Helical Tomotherapy},
author = {Narayanasamy, G and Zhang, X and Paudel, N and Morrill, S and Maraboyina, S and Peacock, L and Penagaricano, J and Meigooni, A and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Nevada Las Vegas, NV and Liang, X and University of Florida Health Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL},
abstractNote = {Purpose: The aim of this project is to study the therapeutic ratio (TR) for helical Tomotherapy (HT) based spatially fractionated radiotherapy (GRID). Estimation of TR was based on the linear-quadratic cell survival model by comparing the normal cell survival in a HT GRID to that of a uniform dose delivery in an open-field for the same tumor survival. Methods: HT GRID plan was generated using a patient specific virtual GRID block pattern of non-divergent, cylinder shaped holes using MLCs. TR was defined as the ratio of normal tissue surviving fraction (SF) under HT GRID irradiation to an open field irradiation with an equivalent dose that result in the same tumor cell SF. The ratio was estimated from DVH data on ten patient plans with deep seated, bulky tumor approved by the treating radiation oncologist. Dependence of the TR values on radio-sensitivity of the tumor cells and prescription dose were also analyzed. Results: The mean ± standard deviation (SD) of TR was 4.0±0.7 (range: 3.1 to 5.5) for the 10 patients with single fraction dose of 20 Gy and tumor cell SF of 0.5 at 2 Gy. In addition, mean±SD of TR = 1±0.1 and 18.0±5.1 were found for tumor with SF of 0.3 and 0.7, respectively. Reducing the prescription dose to 15 and 10 Gy lowered the TR to 2.0±0.2 and 1.2±0.04 for a tumor cell SF of 0.5 at 2 Gy. In this study, the SF of normal cells was assumed to be 0.5 at 2 Gy. Conclusion: HT GRID displayed a significant therapeutic advantage over uniform dose from an open field irradiation. TR increases with the radioresistance of the tumor cells and with prescription dose.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4957614},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: To present the first clinical applications of Helical Tomotherapy-based spatially fractionated radiotherapy (HT-GRID) for deep seated tumors and associated dosimetric study. Methods: Ten previously treated GRID patients were selected (5 HT-GRID and 5 LINAC-GRID using a commercially available GRID block). Each case was re-planned either in HT-GRID or LINAC-GRID for a total of 10 plans for both techniques using same prescribed dose of 20 Gy to maximum point dose of GRID GTV. For TOMO-GRID, a programmable virtual TOMOGRID template mimicking a GRID pattern was generated. Dosimetric parameters compared included: GRID GTV mean dose (Dmean) and equivalent uniform dose (EUD),more » GRID GTV dose inhomogeneity (Ratio(valley/peak)), normal tissue Dmean and EUD, and other organs-at-risk(OARs) doses. Results: The median tumor volume was 634 cc, ranging from 182 to 4646 cc. Median distance from skin to the deepest part of tumor was 22cm, ranging from 8.9 to 38cm. The median GRID GTV Dmean and EUD was 10.65Gy (9.8–12.5Gy) and 7.62Gy (4.31–11.06Gy) for HT-GRID and was 6.73Gy (4.44–8.44Gy) and 3.95Gy (0.14–4.2Gy) for LINAC-GRID. The median Ratio(valley/peak) was 0.144(0.05–0.29) for HT-GRID and was 0.055(0.0001–0.14) for LINAC-GRID. For normal tissue in HT-GRID, the median Dmean and EUD was 1.24Gy (0.34–2.54Gy) and 5.45 Gy(3.45–6.89Gy) and was 0.61 Gy(0.11–1.52Gy) and 6Gy(4.45–6.82Gy) for LINAC-GRID. The OAR doses were comparable between the HT-GRID and LINAC-GRID. However, in some cases it was not possible to avoid a critical structure in LINAC-GRID; while HT-GRID can spare more tissue doses for certain critical structures. Conclusion: HT-GRID delivers higher GRID GTV Dmean, EUD and Ratio(valley/peak) compared to LINAC-GRID. HT-GRID delivers higher Dmean and lower EUD for normal tissue compared to LINAC-GRID. TOMOGRID template can be highly patient-specific and allows adjustment of the GRID pattern to different tumor sizes and shapes when they are deeply-seated and cannot be safely treated with LINAC-GRID.« less
  • Purpose: To perform a dosimetric comparison of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and helical tomotherapy (HT) plans for pelvic and para-aortic RT in postoperative endometrial cancer patients; and to evaluate the integral dose (ID) received by critical structures within the radiation fields. Methods and Materials: We selected 10 patients with Stage IIIC endometrial cancer. For each patient, three plans were created with 3D-CRT, IMRT, and HT. The IMRT and HT plans were both optimized to keep the mean dose to the planning target volume (PTV) the same as that with 3D-CRT. The dosimetry and ID for the criticalmore » structures were compared. A paired two-tailed Student t test was used for data analysis. Results: Compared with the 3D-CRT plans, the IMRT plans resulted in lower IDs in the organs at risk (OARs), ranging from -3.49% to -17.59%. The HT plans showed a similar result except that the ID for the bowel increased 0.27%. The IMRT and HT plans both increased the IDs to normal tissue (see and text for definition), pelvic bone, and spine (range, 3.31-19.7%). The IMRT and HT dosimetry showed superior PTV coverage and better OAR sparing than the 3D-CRT dosimetry. Compared directly with IMRT, HT showed similar PTV coverage, lower Ids, and a decreased dose to most OARs. Conclusion: Intensity-modulated RT and HT appear to achieve excellent PTV coverage and better sparing of OARs, but at the expense of increased IDs to normal tissue and skeleton. HT allows for additional improvement in dosimetry and sparing of most OARs.« less
  • Purpose: To present results and acute toxicity in 14 patients with bulky (>=6 cm) tumors from locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck who received spatially fractionated radiotherapy (GRID) therapy to the bulky mass followed by concomitant chemoradiotherapy using simultaneous integrated boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy (SIB-IMRT). Methods and Materials: GRID therapy to the GTV was delivered by creating one treatment field with a checkerboard pattern composed of open-closed areas using a multileaf collimator. The GRID prescription was 20 Gy in one fraction. Chemotherapy started the day of GRID therapy and continued throughout the course of SIB-IMRT. The SIB-IMRTmore » prescription was 66, 60, and 54 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV), intermediate-risk PTV, and low-risk PTV, respectively, in 30 fractions. Results: With a median follow-up of 19.5 months (range, 2-38 months), the overall control rate of the GRID gross tumor volume was 79% (11 of 14). The most common acute skin and mucosal toxicities were Grade 3 and 2, respectively. Conclusion: For the treatment of locally advanced neck squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck, GRID followed by chemotherapy and SIB-IMRT is well tolerated and yields encouraging clinical and pathologic responses, with similar acute toxicity profiles as in patients receiving chemoradiotherapy without GRID.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate the impact of dose size in single fraction, spatially fractionated (grid) radiotherapy for selectively killing infiltrated melanoma cancer cells of different tumor sizes, using different radiobiological models. Methods: A Monte Carlo technique was employed to calculate the 3D dose distribution of a commercially available megavoltage grid collimator in a 6 MV beam. The linear-quadratic (LQ) and modified linear quadratic (MLQ) models were used separately to evaluate the therapeutic outcome of a series of single fraction regimens that employed grid therapy to treat both acute and late responding melanomas of varying sizes. The dose prescription point was atmore » the center of the tumor volume. Dose sizes ranging from 1 to 30 Gy at 100% dose line were modeled. Tumors were either touching the skin surface or having their centers at a depth of 3 cm. The equivalent uniform dose (EUD) to the melanoma cells and the therapeutic ratio (TR) were defined by comparing grid therapy with the traditional open debulking field. The clinical outcomes from recent reports were used to verify the authors’ model. Results: Dose profiles at different depths and 3D dose distributions in a series of 3D melanomas treated with grid therapy were obtained. The EUDs and TRs for all sizes of 3D tumors involved at different doses were derived through the LQ and MLQ models, and a practical equation was derived. The EUD was only one fifth of the prescribed dose. The TR was dependent on the prescribed dose and on the LQ parameters of both the interspersed cancer and normal tissue cells. The results from the LQ model were consistent with those of the MLQ model. At 20 Gy, the EUD and TR by the LQ model were 2.8% higher and 1% lower than by the MLQ, while at 10 Gy, the EUD and TR as defined by the LQ model were only 1.4% higher and 0.8% lower, respectively. The dose volume histograms of grid therapy for a 10 cm tumor showed different dosimetric characteristics from those of conventional radiotherapy. A significant portion of the tumor volume received a very large dose in grid therapy, which ensures significant tumor cell killing in these regions. Conversely, some areas received a relatively small dose, thereby sparing interspersed normal cells and increasing radiation tolerance. The radiobiology modeling results indicated that grid therapy could be useful for treating acutely responding melanomas infiltrating radiosensitive normal tissues. The theoretical model predictions were supported by the clinical outcomes. Conclusions: Grid therapy functions by selectively killing infiltrating tumor cells and concomitantly sparing interspersed normal cells. The TR depends on the radiosensitivity of the cell population, dose, tumor size, and location. Because the volumes of very high dose regions are small, the LQ model can be used safely to predict the clinical outcomes of grid therapy. When treating melanomas with a dose of 15 Gy or higher, single fraction grid therapy is clearly advantageous for sparing interspersed normal cells. The existence of a threshold fraction dose, which was found in the authors’ theoretical simulations, was confirmed by clinical observations.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate the impact of dose size in single fraction, spatially fractionated (grid) radiotherapy for selectively killing infiltrated melanoma cancer cells of different tumor sizes, using different radiobiological models. Methods: A Monte Carlo technique was employed to calculate the 3D dose distribution of a commercially available megavoltage grid collimator in a 6 MV beam. The linear-quadratic (LQ) and modified linear quadratic (MLQ) models were used separately to evaluate the therapeutic outcome of a series of single fraction regimens that employed grid therapy to treat both acute and late responding melanomas of varying sizes. The dose prescription point was atmore » the center of the tumor volume. Dose sizes ranging from 1 to 30 Gy at 100% dose line were modeled. Tumors were either touching the skin surface or having their centers at a depth of 3 cm. The equivalent uniform dose (EUD) to the melanoma cells and the therapeutic ratio (TR) were defined by comparing grid therapy with the traditional open debulking field. The clinical outcomes from recent reports were used to verify the authors’ model. Results: Dose profiles at different depths and 3D dose distributions in a series of 3D melanomas treated with grid therapy were obtained. The EUDs and TRs for all sizes of 3D tumors involved at different doses were derived through the LQ and MLQ models, and a practical equation was derived. The EUD was only one fifth of the prescribed dose. The TR was dependent on the prescribed dose and on the LQ parameters of both the interspersed cancer and normal tissue cells. The results from the LQ model were consistent with those of the MLQ model. At 20 Gy, the EUD and TR by the LQ model were 2.8% higher and 1% lower than by the MLQ, while at 10 Gy, the EUD and TR as defined by the LQ model were only 1.4% higher and 0.8% lower, respectively. The dose volume histograms of grid therapy for a 10 cm tumor showed different dosimetric characteristics from those of conventional radiotherapy. A significant portion of the tumor volume received a very large dose in grid therapy, which ensures significant tumor cell killing in these regions. Conversely, some areas received a relatively small dose, thereby sparing interspersed normal cells and increasing radiation tolerance. The radiobiology modeling results indicated that grid therapy could be useful for treating acutely responding melanomas infiltrating radiosensitive normal tissues. The theoretical model predictions were supported by the clinical outcomes. Conclusions: Grid therapy functions by selectively killing infiltrating tumor cells and concomitantly sparing interspersed normal cells. The TR depends on the radiosensitivity of the cell population, dose, tumor size, and location. Because the volumes of very high dose regions are small, the LQ model can be used safely to predict the clinical outcomes of grid therapy. When treating melanomas with a dose of 15 Gy or higher, single fraction grid therapy is clearly advantageous for sparing interspersed normal cells. The existence of a threshold fraction dose, which was found in the authors’ theoretical simulations, was confirmed by clinical observations.« less