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Title: TU-H-BRC-01: A New Fabrication Method for Secondary Skin Collimation Using 3D Scanner and 3D Printer

Abstract

Purpose: Using secondary skin collimation (SSC) to protect the critical organ surrounding the tumors is always desirable for electron and/or ortho-voltage treatments. However, the time-consuming and labor-intensive fabrication processes of current method (manually fabricate the lead mask) restrict the general use of SSC. The aim of this study is to develop a new SSC fabrication method using 3D scanning and 3D printing technologies in order to largely decrease the human labor involvement and fabrication time, also improve the fabrication accuracy. Methods: First, the patient surface was scanned with a 3D scanner (Structure Sensor, Occipital, CO). The raw scan data was subsequently transferred to a 3D modeling software (Rhinoceros, Ver. 5.0, McNeel North America, Seattle, WA). The tumor contour was then digitized and shielding region was determined by clinicians in the same software. The corresponding SCC conformed to the skin surface was then automatically generated by the software with the proper shielding thickness. The shell of the SCC (with hollow inside) was consequently printed by a 3D printer (Lulzbot TAZ, Aleph Objects, CO) using plastic material. Finally, the hollow mold of SCC was filled up with a melted cerrobend alloy. Once the cerrobend alloy cooled down, the fabrication of SCC wasmore » accomplished. Results: The results indicated the proposed method can achieve a much shorter time on making a SCC compared with tradition fabrication method. The processes of making a skin contour model for patients have been eliminated with the new method. SCC created by the new method possessed better accuracy and better conformality to patient’s skin contours. Conclusion: In this study, we have demonstrated a new method for the SCC fabrication. It is anticipated that our method can be an alternative way to replace conventional manual-based methods for electron and/or ortho-voltage SCC fabrication. This research was supported by the Global Ph.D. Fellowship Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education (Grant No. 2015H1A2A1034071), Republic of Korea.« less

Authors:
 [1]; ;  [2];  [3];  [4]
  1. The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, N/A (Korea, Republic of)
  2. The catholic university of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)
  3. University Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)
  4. University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22654016
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; COMPUTER CODES; CRITICAL ORGANS; FABRICATION; IMAGE PROCESSING; PATIENTS; SKIN

Citation Formats

Jung, J, Potter, N, Suh, T, Liu, C, and Lu, B. TU-H-BRC-01: A New Fabrication Method for Secondary Skin Collimation Using 3D Scanner and 3D Printer. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4957599.
Jung, J, Potter, N, Suh, T, Liu, C, & Lu, B. TU-H-BRC-01: A New Fabrication Method for Secondary Skin Collimation Using 3D Scanner and 3D Printer. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957599.
Jung, J, Potter, N, Suh, T, Liu, C, and Lu, B. 2016. "TU-H-BRC-01: A New Fabrication Method for Secondary Skin Collimation Using 3D Scanner and 3D Printer". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957599.
@article{osti_22654016,
title = {TU-H-BRC-01: A New Fabrication Method for Secondary Skin Collimation Using 3D Scanner and 3D Printer},
author = {Jung, J and Potter, N and Suh, T and Liu, C and Lu, B},
abstractNote = {Purpose: Using secondary skin collimation (SSC) to protect the critical organ surrounding the tumors is always desirable for electron and/or ortho-voltage treatments. However, the time-consuming and labor-intensive fabrication processes of current method (manually fabricate the lead mask) restrict the general use of SSC. The aim of this study is to develop a new SSC fabrication method using 3D scanning and 3D printing technologies in order to largely decrease the human labor involvement and fabrication time, also improve the fabrication accuracy. Methods: First, the patient surface was scanned with a 3D scanner (Structure Sensor, Occipital, CO). The raw scan data was subsequently transferred to a 3D modeling software (Rhinoceros, Ver. 5.0, McNeel North America, Seattle, WA). The tumor contour was then digitized and shielding region was determined by clinicians in the same software. The corresponding SCC conformed to the skin surface was then automatically generated by the software with the proper shielding thickness. The shell of the SCC (with hollow inside) was consequently printed by a 3D printer (Lulzbot TAZ, Aleph Objects, CO) using plastic material. Finally, the hollow mold of SCC was filled up with a melted cerrobend alloy. Once the cerrobend alloy cooled down, the fabrication of SCC was accomplished. Results: The results indicated the proposed method can achieve a much shorter time on making a SCC compared with tradition fabrication method. The processes of making a skin contour model for patients have been eliminated with the new method. SCC created by the new method possessed better accuracy and better conformality to patient’s skin contours. Conclusion: In this study, we have demonstrated a new method for the SCC fabrication. It is anticipated that our method can be an alternative way to replace conventional manual-based methods for electron and/or ortho-voltage SCC fabrication. This research was supported by the Global Ph.D. Fellowship Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education (Grant No. 2015H1A2A1034071), Republic of Korea.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4957599},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Skin collimation is an important tool for electron beam therapy that is used to minimize the penumbra when treating near critical structures, at extended treatment distances, with bolus, or using arc therapy. It is usually made of lead or lead alloy material that conforms to and is placed on patient surface. Presently, commercially available treatment-planning systems lack the ability to model skin collimation and to accurately calculate dose in its presence. The purpose of the present work was to evaluate the use of the pencil beam redefinition algorithm (PBRA) in calculating dose in the presence of skin collimation. Skin collimationmore » was incorporated into the PBRA by terminating the transport of electrons once they enter the skin collimator. Both fixed- and arced-beam dose calculations for arced-beam geometries were evaluated by comparing them with measured dose distributions for 10- and 15-MeV beams. Fixed-beam dose distributions were measured in water at 88-cm source-to-surface distance with an air gap of 32 cm. The 6x20-cm{sup 2} field (dimensions projected to isocenter) had a 10-mm thick lead collimator placed on the surface of the water with its edge 5 cm inside the field's edge located at +10 cm. Arced-beam dose distributions were measured in a 13.5-cm radius polystyrene circular phantom. The beam was arced 90 deg. (-45 deg. to +45 deg. ), and 10-mm thick lead collimation was placed at {+-}30 deg. . For the fixed beam at 10 MeV, the PBRA-calculated dose agreed with measured dose to within 2.0-mm distance to agreement (DTA) in the regions of high-dose gradient and 2.0% in regions of low dose gradient. At 15 MeV, the PBRA agreed to within a 2.0-mm DTA in the regions of high-dose gradient; however, the PBRA underestimated the dose by as much as 5.3% over small regions at depths less than 2 cm because it did not model electrons scattered from the edge of the skin collimation. For arced beams at 10 MeV, the agreement was 1-mm DTA in the high-dose gradient regions, and 2% in the low-dose gradient regions. For arced beams at 15 MeV, the agreement was 1 mm in the high-dose gradient regions, and in the low-dose gradient region at depth less than 2 cm, as much as 5% dose difference was observed. This study demonstrated the ease with which skin collimation can be incorporated into the PBRA. The good agreement of PBRA calculated with measured dose shows that the PBRA is likely sufficiently accurate for clinical use in the presence of skin collimation for electron arc therapy. To further improve the accuracy of the PBRA in regions having significant electrons scattered from the edge of the skin collimation would require transporting the electrons through the lead skin collimation near its edges.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate the effect of a tungsten eye-shield on the dose distribution of a patient. Methods: A 3D scanner was used to extract the dimension and shape of a tungsten eye-shield in the STL format. Scanned data was transferred into a 3D printer. A dummy eye shield was then produced using bio-resin (3D systems, VisiJet M3 Proplast). For a patient with mucinous carcinoma, the planning CT was obtained with the dummy eye-shield placed on the patient’s right eye. Field shaping of 6 MeV was performed using a patient-specific cerrobend block on the 15 x 15 cm{sup 2} applicator. Themore » gantry angle was 330° to cover the planning target volume near by the lens. EGS4/BEAMnrc was commissioned from our measurement data from a Varian 21EX. For the CT-based dose calculation using EGS4/DOSXYZnrc, the CT images were converted to a phantom file through the ctcreate program. The phantom file had the same resolution as the planning CT images. By assigning the CT numbers of the dummy eye-shield region to 17000, the real dose distributions below the tungsten eye-shield were calculated in EGS4/DOSXYZnrc. In the TPS, the CT number of the dummy eye-shield region was assigned to the maximum allowable CT number (3000). Results: As compared to the maximum dose, the MC dose on the right lens or below the eye shield area was less than 2%, while the corresponding RTP calculated dose was an unrealistic value of approximately 50%. Conclusion: Utilizing a 3D scanner and a 3D printer, a dummy eye-shield for electron treatment can be easily produced. The artifact-free CT images were successfully incorporated into the CT-based Monte Carlo simulations. The developed method was useful in predicting the realistic dose distributions around the lens blocked with the tungsten shield.« less
  • Purpose: In this study, newly formulated XR-RV3 GafChromic film was calibrated with National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) traceability for measurement of patient skin dose during fluoroscopically guided interventional procedures. Methods: The film was calibrated free-in-air to air kerma levels between 15 and 1100 cGy using four moderately filtered x-ray beam qualities (60, 80, 100, and 120 kVp). The calibration films were scanned with a commercial flatbed document scanner. Film reflective density-to-air kerma calibration curves were constructed for each beam quality, with both the orange and white sides facing the x-ray source. A method to correct for nonuniformity inmore » scanner response (up to 25% depending on position) was developed to enable dose measurement with large films. The response of XR-RV3 film under patient backscattering conditions was examined using on-phantom film exposures and Monte Carlo simulations. Results: The response of XR-RV3 film to a given air kerma depended on kVp and film orientation. For a 200 cGy air kerma exposure with the orange side of the film facing the source, the film response increased by 20% from 60 to 120 kVp. At 500 cGy, the increase was 12%. When 500 cGy exposures were performed with the white side facing the x-ray source, the film response increased by 4.0% (60 kVp) to 9.9% (120 kVp) compared to the orange-facing orientation. On-phantom film measurements and Monte Carlo simulations show that using a NIST-traceable free-in-air calibration curve to determine air kerma in the presence of backscatter results in an error from 2% up to 8% depending on beam quality. The combined uncertainty in the air kerma measurement from the calibration curves and scanner nonuniformity correction was {+-}7.1% (95% C.I.). The film showed notable stability. Calibrations of film and scanner separated by 1 yr differed by 1.0%. Conclusions: XR-RV3 radiochromic film response to a given air kerma shows dependence on beam quality and film orientation. The presence of backscatter slightly modifies the x-ray energy spectrum; however, the increase in film response can be attributed primarily to the increase in total photon fluence at the sensitive layer. Film calibration curves created under free-in-air conditions may be used to measure dose from fluoroscopic quality x-ray beams, including patient backscatter with an error less than the uncertainty of the calibration in most cases.« less
  • Video-printer (VP) images of 24 abnormal views from a body CT scanner were made. Although the physical quality of printer images was poor, a group of radiologists and clinicians found that VP images are adequate to confirm the lesion described in the radiology report. The VP images can be used as secondary images, and they can be attached to a report as a part of the radiology service to increase communication between radiologists and clinicians and to prevent the loss of primary images from the radiology file.
  • This study introduces a charge coupled device (CCD) area detector based optical-computed tomography (optical-CT) scanner for comprehensive verification of radiation dose distributions recorded in nonscattering radiochromic dosimeters. Defining characteristics include: (i) a very fast scanning time of {approx}5 min to acquire a complete three-dimensional (3D) dataset, (ii) improved image formation through the use of custom telecentric optics, which ensures accurate projection images and minimizes artifacts from scattered and stray-light sources, and (iii) high resolution (potentially 50 {mu}m) isotropic 3D dose readout. The performance of the CCD scanner for 3D dose readout was evaluated by comparison with independent 3D readout frommore » the single laser beam OCTOPUS-scanner for the same PRESAGE dosimeters. The OCTOPUS scanner was considered the 'gold standard' technique in light of prior studies demonstrating its accuracy. Additional comparisons were made against calculated dose distributions from the ECLIPSE treatment-planning system. Dose readout for the following treatments were investigated: (i) a single rectangular beam irradiation to investigate small field and very steep dose gradient dosimetry away from edge effects, (ii) a 2-field open beam parallel-opposed irradiation to investigate dosimetry along steep dose gradients, and (iii) a 7-field intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) irradiation to investigate dosimetry for complex treatment delivery involving modulation of fluence and for dosimetry along moderate dose gradients. Dose profiles, dose-difference plots, and gamma maps were employed to evaluate quantitative estimates of agreement between independently measured and calculated dose distributions. Results indicated that dose readout from the CCD scanner was in agreement with independent gold-standard readout from the OCTOPUS-scanner as well as the calculated ECLIPSE dose distribution for all treatments, except in regions within a few millimeters of the edge of the dosimeter, where edge artifact is predominant. Agreement of line profiles was observed, even along steep dose gradients. Dose difference plots indicated that the CCD scanner dose readout differed from the OCTOPUSscanner readout and ECLIPSE calculations by {approx}10% along steep dose gradients and by {approx}5% along moderate dose gradients. Gamma maps (3% dose-difference and 3 mm distance-to-agreement acceptance criteria) revealed agreement, except for regions within 5 mm of the edge of the dosimeter where the edge artifact occurs. In summary, the data demonstrate feasibility of using the fast, high-resolution CCD scanner for comprehensive 3D dosimetry in all applications, except where dose readout is required close to the edges of the dosimeter. Further work is ongoing to reduce this artifact.« less