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Title: TU-D-207B-03: Early Assessment of Response to Chemoradiotherapy Based On Textural Analysis of Pre and Mid-Treatment FDG-PET Image in Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate whether tumor textural features extracted from both pre- and mid-treatment FDG-PET images predict early response to chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced head and neck cancer, and investigate whether they provide complementary value to conventional volume-based measurements. Methods: Ninety-four patients with locally advanced head and neck cancers were retrospectively studied. All patients received definitive chemoradiotherapy and underwent FDG-PET planning scans both before and during treatment. Within the primary tumor we extracted 6 textural features based on gray-level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM): entropy, dissimilarity, contrast, correlation, energy, and homogeneity. These image features were evaluated for their predictive power of treatment response to chemoradiotherapy in terms of local recurrence free survival (LRFS) and progression free survival (PFS). Logrank test were used to assess the statistical significance of the stratification between low- and high-risk groups. P-values were adjusted for multiple comparisons by the false discovery rate (FDR) method. Results: All six textural features extracted from pre-treatment PET images significantly differentiated low- and high-risk patient groups for LRFS (P=0.011–0.038) and PFS (P=0.029–0.034). On the other hand, none of the textural features on mid-treatment PET images was statistically significant in stratifying LRFS (P=0.212–0.445) or PFS (P=0.168–0.299). An imaging signature that combines textural feature (GLCM homogeneity)more » and metabolic tumor volume showed an improved performance for predicting LRFS (hazard ratio: 22.8, P<0.0001) and PFS (hazard ratio: 13.9, P=0.0005) in leave-one-out cross validation. Intra-tumor heterogeneity measured by textural features was significantly lower in mid-treatment PET images than in pre-treatment PET images (T-test: P<1.4e-6). Conclusion: Tumor textural features on pretreatment FDG-PET images are predictive for response to chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced head and neck cancer. The complementary information offered by textural features improves patient stratification and may potentially aid in personalized risk-adaptive therapy.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22653982
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; COMBINED THERAPY; HEAD; IMAGES; NECK; NEOPLASMS; PATIENTS; POSITRON COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY

Citation Formats

Cui, Y, Pollom, E, Loo, B, Le, Q, Hara, W, and Li, R. TU-D-207B-03: Early Assessment of Response to Chemoradiotherapy Based On Textural Analysis of Pre and Mid-Treatment FDG-PET Image in Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4957511.
Cui, Y, Pollom, E, Loo, B, Le, Q, Hara, W, & Li, R. TU-D-207B-03: Early Assessment of Response to Chemoradiotherapy Based On Textural Analysis of Pre and Mid-Treatment FDG-PET Image in Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957511.
Cui, Y, Pollom, E, Loo, B, Le, Q, Hara, W, and Li, R. 2016. "TU-D-207B-03: Early Assessment of Response to Chemoradiotherapy Based On Textural Analysis of Pre and Mid-Treatment FDG-PET Image in Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957511.
@article{osti_22653982,
title = {TU-D-207B-03: Early Assessment of Response to Chemoradiotherapy Based On Textural Analysis of Pre and Mid-Treatment FDG-PET Image in Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer},
author = {Cui, Y and Pollom, E and Loo, B and Le, Q and Hara, W and Li, R},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To evaluate whether tumor textural features extracted from both pre- and mid-treatment FDG-PET images predict early response to chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced head and neck cancer, and investigate whether they provide complementary value to conventional volume-based measurements. Methods: Ninety-four patients with locally advanced head and neck cancers were retrospectively studied. All patients received definitive chemoradiotherapy and underwent FDG-PET planning scans both before and during treatment. Within the primary tumor we extracted 6 textural features based on gray-level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM): entropy, dissimilarity, contrast, correlation, energy, and homogeneity. These image features were evaluated for their predictive power of treatment response to chemoradiotherapy in terms of local recurrence free survival (LRFS) and progression free survival (PFS). Logrank test were used to assess the statistical significance of the stratification between low- and high-risk groups. P-values were adjusted for multiple comparisons by the false discovery rate (FDR) method. Results: All six textural features extracted from pre-treatment PET images significantly differentiated low- and high-risk patient groups for LRFS (P=0.011–0.038) and PFS (P=0.029–0.034). On the other hand, none of the textural features on mid-treatment PET images was statistically significant in stratifying LRFS (P=0.212–0.445) or PFS (P=0.168–0.299). An imaging signature that combines textural feature (GLCM homogeneity) and metabolic tumor volume showed an improved performance for predicting LRFS (hazard ratio: 22.8, P<0.0001) and PFS (hazard ratio: 13.9, P=0.0005) in leave-one-out cross validation. Intra-tumor heterogeneity measured by textural features was significantly lower in mid-treatment PET images than in pre-treatment PET images (T-test: P<1.4e-6). Conclusion: Tumor textural features on pretreatment FDG-PET images are predictive for response to chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced head and neck cancer. The complementary information offered by textural features improves patient stratification and may potentially aid in personalized risk-adaptive therapy.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4957511},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Chemoradiotherapy (CRT) has led to improved efficacy in treating locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (LA-SCCHN) but has led to almost universal in-field mucositis. Patients treated with the same regimen often have differences in mucositis occurrence and severity. Mucositis induced via radiation is known to represent an intense inflammatory response histologically. We hypothesized that patients destined to display severe mucocutaneous toxicity would demonstrate greater alterations in thermal intensity early in therapy than identically treated counterparts. This will allow identification of patients that will require more intensive supportive care using thermal imaging technology.
  • Purpose: Administration of gemcitabine together with cisplatin at cytotoxic doses in a chemoradiotherapy regimen is hampered by a high degree of local toxicity. Using the pharmacologic properties of the drug we designed a modified schedule aimed at reducing toxicity while preserving activity. Methods and Materials: Patients with squamous cell carcinomas of the oral cavity, pharynx and larynx, bulky T4, and/or N2 to N3 were eligible. Gemcitabine was administered at a dose of 800 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1 and 12 and cisplatin at a dose of 20 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 2 to 5, every 21 days for 3 courses.more » Radiotherapy, delivered with standard fractionation, was given on Days 8 to 12 and 15 to 19 and was repeated 3 times up to a total dose of {>=}60 Gy. Results: A total of 28 patients were selected. Grade 3 to 4 stomatitis was recorded in 25 patients (89%). Thirteen patients (46%) experienced Grade 3 to 4 neutropenia. Febrile neutropenia occurred in 8 patients (29%) and in 2 was complicated by infection and death. The overall complete response rate was 79%. At a median follow up of 71 months, 11 patients had a locoregional relapse (3-year locoregional control, 64%); 6 patients had distant metastases, among whom only 2 were without locoregional recurrence. The 3-year progression-free survival is 39% and 3-year overall survival has been 43%. Conclusion: The schedule modification did not attenuate local toxicity. Moreover, infections and especially pneumonia, were a major problem. The high activity of gemcitabine when combined with radiotherapy would most likely be better exploited in the context of modified radiation schemes.« less
  • Purpose: Volumetric modulated arc therapy (RapidArc, Varian Medical Systems) permits the delivery of highly conformal dose distributions. We studied planning and delivery in patients who underwent RapidArc for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer (HNC). Methods and Materials: A total of 35 consecutive patients who completed RapidArc with concurrent chemotherapy for Stages III-IV tumors of the oro- and hypopharynx/larynx in our center were identified. All underwent bilateral neck irradiation and 21 patients had at least N2 disease. A simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) delivered 70 Gy (in 2 Gy/fraction) to the planning target volume (PTV){sub boost} and elective nodal regions (PTV{sub elect}) receivedmore » 57.75 Gy. A standard planning constraint set was used and constraints for parotid glands were individually adapted. Treatments were delivered using two arcs after all plans were verified in a solid water phantom using GafChromic External Beam Therapy films. Results: RapidArc planning generally took 1.5-2 h, which was faster than with our previous seven-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy sliding window technique. Film dosimetry revealed that 0.6% of films exceeded a combination of dose differences {>=}3% or distance to agreement {>=}2 mm. More than 99% of both PTVs received {>=}95% of the prescription dose. Average plan conformity index was 1.13 and mean dose to ipsilateral and contralateral parotid glands were 31.4 Gy and 26.1 Gy, respectively. The mean beam-on time was <3 min and mean number of monitor units was 426. Conclusions: RapidArc achieved excellent target coverage and normal tissue sparing, with delivery completed in less than 3 min. RA is currently our standard intensity-modulated radiotherapy approach for advanced HNC.« less
  • Purpose: The tumor volume has been established as a significant predictor of outcomes among patients with head-and-neck cancer undergoing radiotherapy alone. The present study attempted to add to the existing data on tumor volume as a prognostic factor among patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 78 patients who had undergone definitive chemoradiotherapy for Stage III-IV squamous cell cancer of the hypopharynx, oropharynx, and larynx were identified. The primary tumor volumes were calculated from the treatment planning computed tomography scans, and these were correlated to the survival and tumor control data obtained from the retrospective analysis. Results: Themore » interval to progression correlated with the primary tumor volume (p = .007). The critical cutoff point for the tumor volume was identified as 35 cm{sup 3}, and patients with a tumor volume <35 cm{sup 3} had a significantly better prognosis than those with a tumor volume >35 cm{sup 3} at 5 years (43% vs. 71%, p = .010). Longer survival was also correlated with smaller primary tumor volumes (p = .022). Similarly, patients with a primary tumor volume <35 cm{sup 3} had a better prognosis in terms of both progression-free survival (61% vs. 33%, p = .004) and overall survival (84% vs. 41%, p = < .001). On multivariate analysis, the primary tumor volume was the best predictor of recurrence (hazard ratio 4.7, 95% confidence interval 1.9-11.6; p = .001) and survival (hazard ratio 10.0, 95% confidence interval 2.9-35.1; p = < .001). In contrast, the T stage and N stage were not significant factors. Analysis of variance revealed that tumors with locoregional failure were on average 21.6 cm{sup 3} larger than tumors without locoregional failure (p = .028) and 27.1-cm{sup 3} larger than tumors that recurred as distant metastases (p = .020). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that the primary tumor volume is a significant prognostic factor in patients with advanced cancer of the head and neck undergoing definitive chemoradiotherapy and correlated with the treatment outcomes better than the T or N stage.« less
  • Purpose: To present results and acute toxicity in 14 patients with bulky (>=6 cm) tumors from locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck who received spatially fractionated radiotherapy (GRID) therapy to the bulky mass followed by concomitant chemoradiotherapy using simultaneous integrated boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy (SIB-IMRT). Methods and Materials: GRID therapy to the GTV was delivered by creating one treatment field with a checkerboard pattern composed of open-closed areas using a multileaf collimator. The GRID prescription was 20 Gy in one fraction. Chemotherapy started the day of GRID therapy and continued throughout the course of SIB-IMRT. The SIB-IMRTmore » prescription was 66, 60, and 54 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV), intermediate-risk PTV, and low-risk PTV, respectively, in 30 fractions. Results: With a median follow-up of 19.5 months (range, 2-38 months), the overall control rate of the GRID gross tumor volume was 79% (11 of 14). The most common acute skin and mucosal toxicities were Grade 3 and 2, respectively. Conclusion: For the treatment of locally advanced neck squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck, GRID followed by chemotherapy and SIB-IMRT is well tolerated and yields encouraging clinical and pathologic responses, with similar acute toxicity profiles as in patients receiving chemoradiotherapy without GRID.« less