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Title: TU-D-209-01: Dosimetry of Diagnostic Work Up Mammography

Abstract

Purpose: To investigate patient average glandular dose (AGD) characteristics of diagnostic mammography. Methods: The techniques used to image 14420 patients who received diagnostic work up mammography from October 2008 to December 2014 at one academic hospital were retrospectively collected. The most common diagnostic views and the techniques used for each according to compressed breast thickness were determined. For all techniques, 1st half value layer and air kerma output per tube current-exposure time product were measured; then the incident air kerma for each acquisition was calculated. The values for normalized glandular dose (DgN) were obtained with a validated Monte Carlo simulation of mammographic acquisition. The mono-energetic DgN results were combined according to relative fluence using the TASMICS model to obtain DgN coefficients for each spectrum. The spectral DgN and calculated incident air kerma were used to estimate AGD of patients with breast thickness ranging from 2 to 8 cm. Results: The most common views utilized during diagnostic mammography were magnification craniocaudal (24%), magnification mediolateral (19%), spot craniocaudal (28%), and spot mediolateral oblique (24%). The AGD increased with increasing breast thickness for both the magnification and spot views. The AGD for a 5.5 cm thick breast was approximately 6.8 mGy and 2.2more » mGy for the magnification and spot views, respectively. The AGD ranged from 3.6 mGy to 6.8 mGy for the magnification views and from 1.0 mGy to 3.1 mGy for spot views. The difference in AGD between the two magnification views or the two spot views was not significant. Conclusion: These results provide information on breast dose to which screening recalled women are exposed to. In addition to understanding the dose used for common clinical imaging tests, this data could be used when comparing use of mammography for diagnostic workup to other potential modalities, such as breast tomosynthesis and breast CT.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States)
  2. Radboud University Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22653973
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; KERMA; MAMMARY GLANDS; MONTE CARLO METHOD; PATIENTS; RADIATION DOSES; THICKNESS

Citation Formats

Jallow, N, and Sechopoulos, I. TU-D-209-01: Dosimetry of Diagnostic Work Up Mammography. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4957502.
Jallow, N, & Sechopoulos, I. TU-D-209-01: Dosimetry of Diagnostic Work Up Mammography. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957502.
Jallow, N, and Sechopoulos, I. Wed . "TU-D-209-01: Dosimetry of Diagnostic Work Up Mammography". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957502.
@article{osti_22653973,
title = {TU-D-209-01: Dosimetry of Diagnostic Work Up Mammography},
author = {Jallow, N and Sechopoulos, I},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To investigate patient average glandular dose (AGD) characteristics of diagnostic mammography. Methods: The techniques used to image 14420 patients who received diagnostic work up mammography from October 2008 to December 2014 at one academic hospital were retrospectively collected. The most common diagnostic views and the techniques used for each according to compressed breast thickness were determined. For all techniques, 1st half value layer and air kerma output per tube current-exposure time product were measured; then the incident air kerma for each acquisition was calculated. The values for normalized glandular dose (DgN) were obtained with a validated Monte Carlo simulation of mammographic acquisition. The mono-energetic DgN results were combined according to relative fluence using the TASMICS model to obtain DgN coefficients for each spectrum. The spectral DgN and calculated incident air kerma were used to estimate AGD of patients with breast thickness ranging from 2 to 8 cm. Results: The most common views utilized during diagnostic mammography were magnification craniocaudal (24%), magnification mediolateral (19%), spot craniocaudal (28%), and spot mediolateral oblique (24%). The AGD increased with increasing breast thickness for both the magnification and spot views. The AGD for a 5.5 cm thick breast was approximately 6.8 mGy and 2.2 mGy for the magnification and spot views, respectively. The AGD ranged from 3.6 mGy to 6.8 mGy for the magnification views and from 1.0 mGy to 3.1 mGy for spot views. The difference in AGD between the two magnification views or the two spot views was not significant. Conclusion: These results provide information on breast dose to which screening recalled women are exposed to. In addition to understanding the dose used for common clinical imaging tests, this data could be used when comparing use of mammography for diagnostic workup to other potential modalities, such as breast tomosynthesis and breast CT.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4957502},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
  • A goal of an imaging accreditation program is to ensure adequate image quality, verify appropriate staff qualifications, and to assure patient and personnel safety. Currently, more than 35,000 facilities in 10 modalities have been accredited by the American College of Radiology (ACR), making the ACR program one of the most prolific accreditation options in the U.S. In addition, the ACR is one of the accepted accreditations required by some state laws, CMS/MIPPA insurance and others. Familiarity with the ACR accreditation process is therefore essential to clinical diagnostic medical physicists. Maintaining sufficient knowledge of the ACR program must include keeping up-to-datemore » as the various modality requirements are refined to better serve the goals of the program and to accommodate newer technologies and practices. This session consists of presentations from authorities in four ACR accreditation modality programs, including magnetic resonance imaging, mammography, ultrasound, and computed tomography. Each speaker will discuss the general components of the modality program and address any recent changes to the requirements. Learning Objectives: To understand the requirements of the ACR MR accreditation program. The discussion will include accreditation of whole-body general purpose magnets, dedicated extremity systems well as breast MRI accreditation. Anticipated updates to the ACR MRI Quality Control Manual will also be reviewed. To understand the current ACR MAP Accreditation requirement and present the concepts and structure of the forthcoming ACR Digital Mammography QC Manual and Program. To understand the new requirements of the ACR ultrasound accreditation program, and roles the physicist can play in annual equipment surveys and setting up and supervising the routine QC program. To understand the requirements of the ACR CT accreditation program, including updates to the QC manual as well as updates through the FAQ process.« less
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  • Over the past few years, numerous Accreditation Bodies, Regulatory Agencies, and State Regulations have implemented requirements for Radiation Safety Surveys following installation or modification to x-ray rooms. The objective of this session is to review best practices in performing radiation safety surveys for both Therapy and Diagnostic installations, as well as a review of appropriate survey instruments. This session will be appropriate for both therapy and imaging physicists who are looking to increase their working knowledge of radiation safety surveys. Learning Objectives: Identify Appropriate Survey Meters for Radiation Safety Surveys Develop best practices for Radiation Safety Surveys for Therapy unitsmore » that include common areas of concern. Develop best practices for Radiation Safety Surveys of Diagnostic and Nuclear Medicine rooms. Identify acceptable dose levels and the factors that affect the calculations associated with performing Radiation Safety Surveys.« less
  • Purpose: Performance and reliability of medical X-ray tubes for imaging are crucial from an ethical, clinical and economic perspective. This lecture will deliver insight into the aspects to consider during the decision making process to invest in X-ray imaging equipment. Outdated metric still hampers realistic product comparison. It is time to change this and to comply with latest standards, which consider current technology. Failure modes and ways to avoid down-time of the equipment shall be discussed. In view of the increasing number of interventional procedures and the hazards associated with ionizing radiation, toxic contrast agents, and the combination thereof, themore » aspect of system reliability is of paramount importance. Methods: A comprehensive picture of trends for different modalities (CT, angiography, general radiology) has been drawn and led to the development of novel X-ray tube technology. Results: Recent X-ray tubes feature enhanced reliability and unprecedented performance. Relevant metrics for product comparison still have to be implemented in practice. Conclusion: The speed of scientific and industrial development of new diagnostic and therapeutic X-ray sources remains tremendous. Still, users suffer from gaps between desire and reality in day-to-day diagnostic routine. X-ray sources are still limiting cutting-edge medical procedures. Side-effects of wear and tear, limitations of the clinical work flow, costs, the characteristics of the X-ray spectrum and others topics need to be further addressed. New applications and modalities, like detection-based color-resolved X-ray and phase-contrast / dark-field imaging will impact the course of new developments of X-ray sources. Learning Objectives: Understand the basic requirements on medical diagnostic X-ray sources per modality Learn to select the optimal equipment employing state-of-the-art metric Know causes of failures, depending on the way X-ray sources are operated Understand methods to remediate critical situations Understand the meaning of different warranty models I am employee of Royal Philips; R. Behling, No external funding. I am employee of Royal Philips.« less
  • Madan M. Rehani, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston Methods for Eye Lens Dosimetry and Studies On Lens Opacities with Interventionalists Radiation induced cataract is a major threat among staff working in interventional suites. Nearly 16 million interventional procedures are performed annually in USA. Recent studies by the principal investigator’s group, primarily among interventional cardiologists, on behalf of the International Atomic Energy Agency, show posterior subcapsular (PSC) changes in the eye lens in 38–53% of main operators and 21–45% of support staff. These changes have potential to lead to cataract in future years, as per information from A-Bombmore » survivors. The International Commission on Radiological Protection has reduced dose limit for staff by a factor of 7.5 (from 150 mSv/y to 20 mSv/y). With increasing emphasis on radiation induced cataracts and reduction in threshold dose for eye lens, there is a need to implement strategies for estimating eye lens dose. Unfortunately eye lens dosimetry is at infancy when it comes to routine application. Various approaches are being tried namely direct measurement using active or passive dosimeters kept close to eyes, retrospective estimations and lastly correlating patient dose in interventional procedures with staff eye dose. The talk will review all approaches available and ongoing active research in this area, as well as data from surveys done in Europe on status of eye dose monitoring in interventional radiology and nuclear medicine. The talk will provide update on how good is Hp(10) against Hp(3), estimations from CTDI values, Monte Carlo based simulations and current status of eye lens dosimetry in USA and Europe. The cataract risk among patients is in CT examinations of the head. Since radiation induced cataract predominantly occurs in posterior sub-capsular (PSC) region and is thus distinguishable from age or drug related cataracts and is also preventable, actions on awareness can lead to avoidance or even prevention. Learning Objectives: To understand recent changes in eye lens dose limits and thresholds for tissue reactions To understand different approaches to dose estimation for eye lens To learn about challenges in eye lens opacities among staff in interventional fluoroscopy Di Zhang, Toshiba America Medical Systems, Tustin, CA, USA Eye lens radiation dose from brain perfusion CT exams CT perfusion imaging requires repeatedly exposing one location of the head to monitor the uptake and washout of iodinated contrast. The accumulated radiation dose to the eye lens can be high, leading to concerns about potential radiation injury from these scans. CTDIvol assumes continuous z coverage and can overestimate eye lens dose in CT perfusion scans where the table do not increment. The radiation dose to the eye lens from clinical CT brain perfusion studies can be estimated using Monte Carlo simulation methods on voxelized patient models. MDCT scanners from four major manufacturers were simulated and the eye lens doses were estimated using the AAPM posted clinical protocols. They were also compared to CTDIvol values to evaluate the overestimation from CTDIvol. The efficacy of eye lens dose reduction techniques such as tilting the gantry and moving the scan location away from the eyelens were also investigated. Eye lens dose ranged from 81 mGy to 279 mGy, depending on the scanner and protocol used. It is between 59% and 63% of the CTDIvol values reported by the scanners. The eye lens dose is significantly reduced when the eye lenses were not directly irradiated. CTDIvol should not be interpreted as patient dose; this study has shown it to overestimate dose to the eye lens. These results may be used to provide more accurate estimates of actual dose to ensure that protocols are operated safely below thresholds. Tilting the gantry or moving the scanning region further away from the eyes are effective for reducing lens dose in clinical practice. These actions should be considered when they are consistent with the clinical task and patient anatomy. Learning Objectives: To become familiar with method of eye dose estimation for patient in specific situation of brain perfusion CT To become familiar with level of eye lens radiation doses in patients undergoing brain perfusion MDCT To understand methods for reducing eye lens dose to patient Jong Min Park, Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Korea Eye lens dosimetry in radiotherapy using contact lens-shaped applicator Dose calculation accuracy of commercial treatment planning systems is relatively low at shallow depths. Therefore, in-vivo measurements are often performed in the clinic to verify delivered doses to eye lens which are located at shallow depth. Current in-vivo dosimetry for eye lens during radiotherapy is generally performed with small in-vivo dosimeters on the surface of patient eyelid. Since this procedure potentially contains considerable uncertainty, a contact lens-shaped applicator made of acrylic (lens applicator) was developed for in-vivo measurements of eye lens dose during radiotherapy to reduce uncertainty. The lens applicator allows the insertion of commercially available metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters. Computed tomography (CT) images of an anthropomorphic phantom with and without the lens applicator were acquired. A total of 20 VMAT plans were delivered to an anthropomorphic phantom and the doses with the lens applicator and the doses at the surface of the eyelid were measured using both micro and standard MOSFET dosimeters. The differences in measured dose at the surface of the eyelid from the calculated lens dose were acquired. 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