skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: TU-AB-BRA-12: Quality Assurance of An Integrated Magnetic Resonance Image Guided Adaptive Radiotherapy Machine Using Cherenkov Imaging

Abstract

Purpose: To investigate the viability of using Cherenkov imaging as a fast and robust method for quality assurance tests in the presence of a magnetic field, where other instruments can be limited. Methods: Water tank measurements were acquired from a clinically utilized adaptive magnetic resonance image guided radiation therapy (MR-IGRT) machine with three multileaf-collimator equipped 60Co sources. Cherenkov imaging used an intensified charge coupled device (ICCD) camera placed 3.5m from the treatment isocenter, looking down the bore of the 0.35T MRI into a water tank. Images were post-processed to make quantitative comparison between Cherenkov light intensity with both film and treatment planning system predictions, in terms of percent depth dose curves as well as lateral beam profile measurements. A TG-119 commissioning test plan (C4: C-Shape) was imaged in real-time at 6.33 frames per second to investigate the temporal and spatial resolution of the Cherenkov imaging technique. Results: A .33mm/pixel Cherenkov image resolution was achieved across 1024×1024 pixels in this setup. Analysis of the Cherenkov image of a 10.5×10.5cm treatment beam in the water tank successfully measured the beam width at the depth of maximum dose within 1.2% of the film measurement at the same point. The percent depth dose curvemore » for the same beam was on average within 2% of ionization chamber measurements for corresponding depths between 3–100mm. Cherenkov video of the TG-119 test plan provided qualitative agreement with the treatment planning system dose predictions, and a novel temporal verification of the treatment. Conclusions: Cherenkov imaging was successfully used to make QA measurements of percent depth dose curves and cross beam profiles of MRI-IGRT radiotherapy machines after only several seconds of beam-on time and data capture; both curves were extracted from the same data set. Video-rate imaging of a dynamic treatment plan provided new information regarding temporal dose deposition. This study has been funded by NIH grants R21EB17559 and R01CA109558, as well as Norris Cotton Cancer Center Pilot funding.« less

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]; ; ;  [2];  [3]
  1. Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (United States)
  2. Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO (United States)
  3. Dartmouth-Hitchcock Med. Ctr., Lebanon, NH (Lebanon)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22653954
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; BEAM PROFILES; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; CHARGE-COUPLED DEVICES; COBALT 60; DEPTH DOSE DISTRIBUTIONS; IMAGES; IONIZATION CHAMBERS; NMR IMAGING; PLANNING; QUALITY ASSURANCE; RADIOTHERAPY; SPATIAL RESOLUTION; VISIBLE RADIATION; WATER

Citation Formats

Andreozzi, J, Bruza, P, Saunders, S, Pogue, B, Mooney, K, Curcuru, A, Green, O, and Gladstone, D. TU-AB-BRA-12: Quality Assurance of An Integrated Magnetic Resonance Image Guided Adaptive Radiotherapy Machine Using Cherenkov Imaging. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4957422.
Andreozzi, J, Bruza, P, Saunders, S, Pogue, B, Mooney, K, Curcuru, A, Green, O, & Gladstone, D. TU-AB-BRA-12: Quality Assurance of An Integrated Magnetic Resonance Image Guided Adaptive Radiotherapy Machine Using Cherenkov Imaging. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957422.
Andreozzi, J, Bruza, P, Saunders, S, Pogue, B, Mooney, K, Curcuru, A, Green, O, and Gladstone, D. 2016. "TU-AB-BRA-12: Quality Assurance of An Integrated Magnetic Resonance Image Guided Adaptive Radiotherapy Machine Using Cherenkov Imaging". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957422.
@article{osti_22653954,
title = {TU-AB-BRA-12: Quality Assurance of An Integrated Magnetic Resonance Image Guided Adaptive Radiotherapy Machine Using Cherenkov Imaging},
author = {Andreozzi, J and Bruza, P and Saunders, S and Pogue, B and Mooney, K and Curcuru, A and Green, O and Gladstone, D},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To investigate the viability of using Cherenkov imaging as a fast and robust method for quality assurance tests in the presence of a magnetic field, where other instruments can be limited. Methods: Water tank measurements were acquired from a clinically utilized adaptive magnetic resonance image guided radiation therapy (MR-IGRT) machine with three multileaf-collimator equipped 60Co sources. Cherenkov imaging used an intensified charge coupled device (ICCD) camera placed 3.5m from the treatment isocenter, looking down the bore of the 0.35T MRI into a water tank. Images were post-processed to make quantitative comparison between Cherenkov light intensity with both film and treatment planning system predictions, in terms of percent depth dose curves as well as lateral beam profile measurements. A TG-119 commissioning test plan (C4: C-Shape) was imaged in real-time at 6.33 frames per second to investigate the temporal and spatial resolution of the Cherenkov imaging technique. Results: A .33mm/pixel Cherenkov image resolution was achieved across 1024×1024 pixels in this setup. Analysis of the Cherenkov image of a 10.5×10.5cm treatment beam in the water tank successfully measured the beam width at the depth of maximum dose within 1.2% of the film measurement at the same point. The percent depth dose curve for the same beam was on average within 2% of ionization chamber measurements for corresponding depths between 3–100mm. Cherenkov video of the TG-119 test plan provided qualitative agreement with the treatment planning system dose predictions, and a novel temporal verification of the treatment. Conclusions: Cherenkov imaging was successfully used to make QA measurements of percent depth dose curves and cross beam profiles of MRI-IGRT radiotherapy machines after only several seconds of beam-on time and data capture; both curves were extracted from the same data set. Video-rate imaging of a dynamic treatment plan provided new information regarding temporal dose deposition. This study has been funded by NIH grants R21EB17559 and R01CA109558, as well as Norris Cotton Cancer Center Pilot funding.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4957422},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • We reviewed the quality assurance procedures that have been used to test fan- and cone-beam megavoltage-based in-room imaging systems. Phantom-based tests have been used to establish the geometric accuracy and precision of megavoltage-based systems. However, the clinical implementation of any system is accompanied by challenges that are best tested in a clinical setting using clinical images. To objectively judge and monitor image quality, a set of standard tests and phantoms can be used. The image noise and spatial and contrast resolution have been assessed using standard computed tomography phantoms. The dose to the patient resulting from the imaging procedure canmore » be determined using calculations or measurements. The off-line use of patient images is of interest for the evaluation of dosimetric changes throughout the treatment course. The accuracy of the dosimetric calculations based on the megavoltage images has been tested for the fan- and cone-beam systems. Some of the described tests are typically performed before the clinical implementation of the imaging system; others are suited to monitor the system's performances.« less
  • The requirements of quality assurance (QA) for both brachytherapy and imaging devices are well-defined, but image-guided brachytherapy has raised new issues. Image guidance in brachytherapy involves the transition from reference point dosimetry using films to volumetric imaging such as computed tomography, ultrasonography, and magnetic resonance imaging for treatment planning and guidance of applicator, needle, or seed placement. The QA of these devices might not reflect the conditions of use in brachytherapy or the requirements of brachytherapy treatment planning. Image interpretation becomes much more important with image-guided brachytherapy. The success of a procedure could depend on the interpretation of a singlemore » image in a calibration phase done under the time pressures of the operative setting. This change has implications at the level of treatment, the process, and the field of brachytherapy as a whole. The QA concerns arising from brachytherapy procedures using ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging guidance are discussed, as are the problems associated with using imaging in an interventional setting. This report was intended to indicate the QA concerns arising from the convergence of brachytherapy and imaging-highlighting areas in which technical improvements are needed.« less
  • Purpose: To test the sensitivity of the quality assurance (QA) tools actively used on a clinical MR-IGRT system for potential delivery errors. Methods: Patient-specific QA procedures have been implemented for a commercially available Cobalt-60 MR-IGRT system. The QA tools utilized were a MR-compatible cylindrical diode-array detector (ArcCHECK) with a custom insert which positions an ionization chamber (Exradin A18) in the middle of the device, as well as an in-house treatment delivery verification program. These tools were tested to investigate their sensitivity to delivery errors. For the ArcCHECK and ion chamber, a baseline was established with a static field irradiation tomore » a known dose. Variations of the baseline were investigated which included rotated gantry, altered field size, directional shifts, and different delivery time. In addition, similar variations were tested with the automated delivery verification program that compared the treatment parameters in the machine delivery logs to the ones in the plan. To test the software, a 3-field conformal plan was generated as the baseline. Results: ArcCHECK noted at least a 13% decrease in passing rate from baseline in the following scenarios: gantry rotation of 1 degree from plan, 5mm change in field size, 2mm lateral shift, and delivery time decrease. Ion chamber measurements remained consistent for these variations except for the 5 second decrease in delivery time scenario which resulted in an 8% difference from baseline. The delivery verification software was able to detect and report the simulated errors such as when the gantry was rotated by 0.6 degrees, the beam weighting was changed by a percent, a single multileaf collimator was moved by 1cm, and the dose was changed from 2 to 1.8Gy. Conclusion: The results show that the current tools used for patient specific QA are capable of detecting small errors in RT delivery with presence of magnetic field.« less
  • The quality assurance/quality control purpose is this. We design a treatment plan, and we wish to be as certain as reasonably possible that the treatment is delivered as planned. In the case of conventionally planned prostate brachytherapy, implementing to the letter the implantation plan is rarely attainable and therefore can require adaptive replanning (a quality control issue). The reasons for this state of affairs include changes in the prostate shape and volume during implantation and treatment delivery (e.g., edema resolution) and unavoidable inaccuracy in the placement of the seeds in the prostate. As a result, quality-control activities (e.g., the needmore » to monitor-ideally, on the fly-the target and urethral and rectal dosage) must be also addressed.« less
  • Quality assurance has long been implemented in radiation treatment as systematic actions necessary to provide adequate confidence that the radiation oncology service will satisfy the given requirements for quality care. The existing reports from the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Groups 40 and 53 have provided highly detailed QA guidelines for conventional radiotherapy and treatment planning. However, advanced treatment processes recently developed with emerging high technology have introduced new QA requirements that have not been addressed previously in the conventional QA program. Therefore, it is necessary to expand the existing QA guidelines to also include new considerations. Image-guidedmore » adaptive radiation therapy (IGART) is a closed-loop treatment process that is designed to include the individual treatment information, such as patient-specific anatomic variation and delivered dose assessed during the therapy course in treatment evaluation and planning optimization. Clinical implementation of IGART requires high levels of automation in image acquisition, registration, segmentation, treatment dose construction, and adaptive planning optimization, which brings new challenges to the conventional QA program. In this article, clinical QA procedures for IGART are outlined. The discussion focuses on the dynamic or four-dimensional aspects of the IGART process, avoiding overlap with conventional QA guidelines.« less