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Title: TU-AB-BRC-11: Moving a GPU-OpenCL-Based Monte Carlo (MC) Dose Engine Towards Routine Clinical Use: Automatic Beam Commissioning and Efficient Source Sampling

Abstract

Purpose: We have previously developed a GPU-OpenCL-based MC dose engine named goMC with built-in analytical linac beam model. To move goMC towards routine clinical use, we have developed an automatic beam-commissioning method, and an efficient source sampling strategy to facilitate dose calculations for real treatment plans. Methods: Our commissioning method is to automatically adjust the relative weights among the sub-sources, through an optimization process minimizing the discrepancies between calculated dose and measurements. Six models built for Varian Truebeam linac photon beams (6MV, 10MV, 15MV, 18MV, 6MVFFF, 10MVFFF) were commissioned using measurement data acquired at our institution. To facilitate dose calculations for real treatment plans, we employed inverse sampling method to efficiently incorporate MLC leaf-sequencing into source sampling. Specifically, instead of sampling source particles control-point by control-point and rejecting the particles blocked by MLC, we assigned a control-point index to each sampled source particle, according to MLC leaf-open duration of each control-point at the pixel where the particle intersects the iso-center plane. Results: Our auto-commissioning method decreased distance-to-agreement (DTA) of depth dose at build-up regions by 36.2% averagely, making it within 1mm. Lateral profiles were better matched for all beams, with biggest improvement found at 15MV for which root-mean-square difference wasmore » reduced from 1.44% to 0.50%. Maximum differences of output factors were reduced to less than 0.7% for all beams, with largest decrease being from1.70% to 0.37% found at 10FFF. Our new sampling strategy was tested on a Head&Neck VMAT patient case. Achieving clinically acceptable accuracy, the new strategy could reduce the required history number by a factor of ∼2.8 given a statistical uncertainty level and hence achieve a similar speed-up factor. Conclusion: Our studies have demonstrated the feasibility and effectiveness of our auto-commissioning approach and new efficient source sampling strategy, implying the potential of our GPU-based MC dose engine goMC for routine clinical use.« less

Authors:
; ; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. UT Southwestern Medical Ctr, Dallas, TX (United States)
  2. Beihang University, Beijing (China)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22653940
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; COMMISSIONING; DEPTH DOSE DISTRIBUTIONS; DIFFERENTIAL THERMAL ANALYSIS; LINEAR ACCELERATORS; MONTE CARLO METHOD; PHOTON BEAMS; SAMPLING

Citation Formats

Tian, Z, Folkerts, M, Jiang, S, Jia, X, and Li, Y. TU-AB-BRC-11: Moving a GPU-OpenCL-Based Monte Carlo (MC) Dose Engine Towards Routine Clinical Use: Automatic Beam Commissioning and Efficient Source Sampling. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4957405.
Tian, Z, Folkerts, M, Jiang, S, Jia, X, & Li, Y. TU-AB-BRC-11: Moving a GPU-OpenCL-Based Monte Carlo (MC) Dose Engine Towards Routine Clinical Use: Automatic Beam Commissioning and Efficient Source Sampling. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957405.
Tian, Z, Folkerts, M, Jiang, S, Jia, X, and Li, Y. 2016. "TU-AB-BRC-11: Moving a GPU-OpenCL-Based Monte Carlo (MC) Dose Engine Towards Routine Clinical Use: Automatic Beam Commissioning and Efficient Source Sampling". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957405.
@article{osti_22653940,
title = {TU-AB-BRC-11: Moving a GPU-OpenCL-Based Monte Carlo (MC) Dose Engine Towards Routine Clinical Use: Automatic Beam Commissioning and Efficient Source Sampling},
author = {Tian, Z and Folkerts, M and Jiang, S and Jia, X and Li, Y},
abstractNote = {Purpose: We have previously developed a GPU-OpenCL-based MC dose engine named goMC with built-in analytical linac beam model. To move goMC towards routine clinical use, we have developed an automatic beam-commissioning method, and an efficient source sampling strategy to facilitate dose calculations for real treatment plans. Methods: Our commissioning method is to automatically adjust the relative weights among the sub-sources, through an optimization process minimizing the discrepancies between calculated dose and measurements. Six models built for Varian Truebeam linac photon beams (6MV, 10MV, 15MV, 18MV, 6MVFFF, 10MVFFF) were commissioned using measurement data acquired at our institution. To facilitate dose calculations for real treatment plans, we employed inverse sampling method to efficiently incorporate MLC leaf-sequencing into source sampling. Specifically, instead of sampling source particles control-point by control-point and rejecting the particles blocked by MLC, we assigned a control-point index to each sampled source particle, according to MLC leaf-open duration of each control-point at the pixel where the particle intersects the iso-center plane. Results: Our auto-commissioning method decreased distance-to-agreement (DTA) of depth dose at build-up regions by 36.2% averagely, making it within 1mm. Lateral profiles were better matched for all beams, with biggest improvement found at 15MV for which root-mean-square difference was reduced from 1.44% to 0.50%. Maximum differences of output factors were reduced to less than 0.7% for all beams, with largest decrease being from1.70% to 0.37% found at 10FFF. Our new sampling strategy was tested on a Head&Neck VMAT patient case. Achieving clinically acceptable accuracy, the new strategy could reduce the required history number by a factor of ∼2.8 given a statistical uncertainty level and hence achieve a similar speed-up factor. Conclusion: Our studies have demonstrated the feasibility and effectiveness of our auto-commissioning approach and new efficient source sampling strategy, implying the potential of our GPU-based MC dose engine goMC for routine clinical use.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4957405},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: Low computational efficiency of Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation impedes its clinical applications. Although a number of MC dose packages have been developed over the past few years, enabling fast MC dose calculations, most of these packages were developed under NVidia’s CUDA environment. This limited their code portability to other platforms, hindering the introduction of GPU-based MC dose engines to clinical practice. To solve this problem, we developed a cross-platform fast MC dose engine named oclMC under OpenCL environment for external photon and electron radiotherapy. Methods: Coupled photon-electron simulation was implemented with standard analogue simulation scheme for photon transportmore » and Class II condensed history scheme for electron transport. We tested the accuracy and efficiency of oclMC by comparing the doses calculated using oclMC and gDPM, a previously developed GPU-based MC code on NVidia GPU platform, for a 15MeV electron beam and a 6MV photon beam in a homogenous water phantom, a water-bone-lung-water slab phantom and a half-slab phantom. We also tested code portability of oclMC on different devices, including an NVidia GPU, two AMD GPUs and an Intel CPU. Results: Satisfactory agreements were observed in all photon and electron cases, with ∼0.48%–0.53% average dose differences at regions within 10% isodose line for electron beam cases and ∼0.15%–0.17% for photon beam cases. It took oclMC 3–4 sec to perform transport simulation for electron beam on NVidia Titan GPU and 35–51 sec for photon beam, both with ∼0.5% statistical uncertainty. The computation was 6%–17% slower than gDPM due to the differences in both physics model and development environment, which is considered not significant for clinical applications. In terms of code portability, gDPM only runs on NVidia GPUs, while oclMC successfully runs on all the tested devices. Conclusion: oclMC is an accurate and fast MC dose engine. Its high cross-platform portability makes it clinically attractive.« less
  • Purpose Dose calculation is of critical importance for carbon ion therapy. Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is considered to be the most accurate method for calculation of absorbed dose and of all the more fundamental physical quantities related to biological effects. The long computation time, however, limits its routine clinical applications. We have recently started developing a fast MC package, gCMC for carbon therapy on a parallel processing platform, e.g. GPU, aiming at achieving sufficient efficiency to enable MC in clinically important tasks. This abstract reports our progress. Methods gCMC was developed in OpenCL environment. Our initial developments focused on watermore » material. gCMC supported carbon ion transport in the energy range of 1–450 MeV/u. A Class II condensed history algorithm was implemented for charged particle transport simulations with stopping power computed via Bethe-Bloch equation. Energy straggling and multiple scattering were modeled. Total cross section of nuclear interaction was extracted from Geant4. At present, nuclear interaction events were sampled but transports of secondary particles were not included. Results We tested cases with a homogeneous water phantom and a pencil carbon ion beam with energy of 200–400 MeV/u. When only electro-magnetic channel was included, dose/fluence difference between gCMC and Geant4 results averaged within 10% isodose line was <0.5% of the maximum dose/fluence. After enabling nuclear interactions without transporting secondary particles, dose and fluence agreed with the corresponding results computed by Geant4 with <1% difference. Due to the support for multiple platforms of OpenCL, gCMC was executable on NVidia and AMD GPUs, and Intel CPUs. It took ∼50 sec to transport 107 200MeV/u source carbon ions on an NVidia Titan GPU card. Conclusion Preliminary studies have demonstrated the accuracy and efficiency of gCMC. With further developments in near future, gCMC will potentially achieve clinically acceptable fast and accurate MC simulations for carbon ion therapy.« less
  • Purpose: One of the most accurate methods for radiation transport is Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. Long computation time prevents its wide applications in clinic. We have recently developed a fast MC code for carbon ion therapy called GPU-based OpenCL Carbon Monte Carlo (goCMC) and its accuracy in physical dose has been established. Since radiobiology is an indispensible aspect of carbon ion therapy, this study evaluates accuracy of goCMC in biological dose and microdosimetry by benchmarking it with FLUKA. Methods: We performed simulations of a carbon pencil beam with 150, 300 and 450 MeV/u in a homogeneous water phantom using goCMCmore » and FLUKA. Dose and energy spectra for primary and secondary ions on the central beam axis were recorded. Repair-misrepair-fixation model was employed to calculate Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE). Monte Carlo Damage Simulation (MCDS) tool was used to calculate microdosimetry parameters. Results: Physical dose differences on the central axis were <1.6% of the maximum value. Before the Bragg peak, differences in RBE and RBE-weighted dose were <2% and <1%. At the Bragg peak, the differences were 12.5% caused by small range discrepancy and sensitivity of RBE to beam spectra. Consequently, RBE-weighted dose difference was 11%. Beyond the peak, RBE differences were <20% and primarily caused by differences in the Helium-4 spectrum. However, the RBE-weighted dose agreed within 1% due to the low physical dose. Differences in microdosimetric quantities were small except at the Bragg peak. The simulation time per source particle with FLUKA was 0.08 sec, while goCMC was approximately 1000 times faster. Conclusion: Physical doses computed by FLUKA and goCMC were in good agreement. Although relatively large RBE differences were observed at and beyond the Bragg peak, the RBE-weighted dose differences were considered to be acceptable.« less
  • Purpose: Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is typically regarded as the most accurate dose calculation method for proton therapy. Yet for real clinical cases, the overall accuracy also depends on that of the MC beam model. Commissioning a beam model to faithfully represent a real beam requires finely tuning a set of model parameters, which could be tedious given the large number of pencil beams to commmission. This abstract reports an automatic beam-model commissioning method for pencil-beam scanning proton therapy via an optimization approach. Methods: We modeled a real pencil beam with energy and spatial spread following Gaussian distributions. Mean energy,more » and energy and spatial spread are model parameters. To commission against a real beam, we first performed MC simulations to calculate dose distributions of a set of ideal (monoenergetic, zero-size) pencil beams. Dose distribution for a real pencil beam is hence linear superposition of doses for those ideal pencil beams with weights in the Gaussian form. We formulated the commissioning task as an optimization problem, such that the calculated central axis depth dose and lateral profiles at several depths match corresponding measurements. An iterative algorithm combining conjugate gradient method and parameter fitting was employed to solve the optimization problem. We validated our method in simulation studies. Results: We calculated dose distributions for three real pencil beams with nominal energies 83, 147 and 199 MeV using realistic beam parameters. These data were regarded as measurements and used for commission. After commissioning, average difference in energy and beam spread between determined values and ground truth were 4.6% and 0.2%. With the commissioned model, we recomputed dose. Mean dose differences from measurements were 0.64%, 0.20% and 0.25%. Conclusion: The developed automatic MC beam-model commissioning method for pencil-beam scanning proton therapy can determine beam model parameters with satisfactory accuracy.« less
  • Purpose: An automated system, MC2, was developed to convert DICOM proton therapy treatment plans into a sequence MCNPX input files, and submit these to a computing cluster. MC2 converts the results into DICOM format, and any treatment planning system can import the data for comparison vs. conventional dose predictions. This work describes the data and the efforts made to validate the MC2 system against measured dose profiles and how the system was calibrated to predict the correct number of monitor units (MUs) to deliver the prescribed dose. Methods: A set of simulated lateral and longitudinal profiles was compared to datamore » measured for commissioning purposes and during annual quality assurance efforts. Acceptance criteria were relative dose differences smaller than 3% and differences in range (in water) of less than 2 mm. For two out of three double scattering beam lines validation results were already published. Spot checks were performed to assure proper performance. For the small snout, all available measurements were used for validation vs. simulated data. To calibrate the dose per MU, the energy deposition per source proton at the center of the spread out Bragg peaks (SOBPs) was recorded for a set of SOBPs from each option. Subsequently these were then scaled to the results of dose per MU determination based on published methods. The simulations of the doses in the magnetically scanned beam line were also validated vs. measured longitudinal and lateral profiles. The source parameters were fine tuned to achieve maximum agreement with measured data. The dosimetric calibration was performed by scoring energy deposition per proton, and scaling the results to a standard dose measurement of a 10 x 10 x 10 cm3 volume irradiation using 100 MU. Results: All simulated data passed the acceptance criteria. Conclusion: MC2 is fully validated and ready for clinical application.« less