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Title: TU-A-201-02: Treatment Site-Specific Considerations for Clinical IGRT

Abstract

Recent years have seen a widespread proliferation of available in-room image guidance systems for radiation therapy target localization with many centers having multiple in-room options. In this session, available imaging systems for in-room IGRT will be reviewed highlighting the main differences in workflow efficiency, targeting accuracy and image quality as it relates to target visualization. Decision-making strategies for integrating these tools into clinical image guidance protocols that are tailored to specific disease sites like H&N, lung, pelvis, and spine SBRT will be discussed. Learning Objectives: Major system characteristics of a wide range of available in-room imaging systems for IGRT. Advantages / disadvantages of different systems for site-specific IGRT considerations. Concepts of targeting accuracy and time efficiency in designing clinical imaging protocols.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. University of Virginia Health Systems (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22653930
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; DECISION MAKING; IMAGE PROCESSING; IMAGES

Citation Formats

Wijesooriya, K. TU-A-201-02: Treatment Site-Specific Considerations for Clinical IGRT. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4957394.
Wijesooriya, K. TU-A-201-02: Treatment Site-Specific Considerations for Clinical IGRT. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957394.
Wijesooriya, K. Wed . "TU-A-201-02: Treatment Site-Specific Considerations for Clinical IGRT". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957394.
@article{osti_22653930,
title = {TU-A-201-02: Treatment Site-Specific Considerations for Clinical IGRT},
author = {Wijesooriya, K.},
abstractNote = {Recent years have seen a widespread proliferation of available in-room image guidance systems for radiation therapy target localization with many centers having multiple in-room options. In this session, available imaging systems for in-room IGRT will be reviewed highlighting the main differences in workflow efficiency, targeting accuracy and image quality as it relates to target visualization. Decision-making strategies for integrating these tools into clinical image guidance protocols that are tailored to specific disease sites like H&N, lung, pelvis, and spine SBRT will be discussed. Learning Objectives: Major system characteristics of a wide range of available in-room imaging systems for IGRT. Advantages / disadvantages of different systems for site-specific IGRT considerations. Concepts of targeting accuracy and time efficiency in designing clinical imaging protocols.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4957394},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
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