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Title: MO-FG-CAMPUS-IeP2-03: Validation of an SSDE-To-Organ-Dose Calculation Methodology Developed for Pediatric CT in An Adult Population

Abstract

Purpose: To discover if a previously published methodology for estimating patient-specific organ dose in a pediatric population (5–55kg) is translatable to the adult sized patient population (> 55 kg). Methods: An adult male anthropomorphic phantom was scanned with metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters placed at 23 organ locations in the chest and abdominopelvic regions to determine absolute organ dose. Organ-dose-to-SSDE correlation factors were developed by dividing individual phantom organ doses by SSDE of the phantom; where SSDE was calculated at the center of the scan volume of the chest and abdomen/pelvis separately. Organ dose correlation factors developed in phantom were multiplied by 28 chest and 22 abdominopelvic patient SSDE values to estimate organ dose. The median patient weight from the CT examinations was 68.9 kg (range 57–87 kg) and median age was 17 years (range 13–28 years). Calculated organ dose estimates were compared to published Monte Carlo simulated patient and phantom results. Results: Organ-dose-to-SSDE correlation was determined for a total of 23 organs in the chest and abdominopelvic regions. For organs fully covered by the scan volume, correlation in the chest (median 1.3; range 1.1–1.5) and abdominopelvic (median 0.9; range 0.7–1.0) was 1.0 ± 10%. For organsmore » that extended beyond the scan volume (i.e. skin bone marrow and bone surface) correlation was determined to be a median of 0.3 (range 0.1–0.4). Calculated patient organ dose using patient SSDE agreed to better than 6% (chest) and 15% (abdominopelvic) to published values. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that our previous published methodology for calculating organ dose using patient-specific SSDE for the chest and abdominopelvic regions is translatable to adult sized patients for organs fully covered by the scan volume.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2]; ;  [3]
  1. Christian Brothers University, Memphis, TN (United States)
  2. (United States)
  3. St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22653899
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; ADULTS; BONE MARROW; CHEST; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; CORRELATIONS; MONTE CARLO METHOD; OXIDES; PATIENTS; PEDIATRICS; PHANTOMS; RADIATION DOSES

Citation Formats

Mead, H, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN, Brady, S, and Kaufman, R. MO-FG-CAMPUS-IeP2-03: Validation of an SSDE-To-Organ-Dose Calculation Methodology Developed for Pediatric CT in An Adult Population. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4957351.
Mead, H, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN, Brady, S, & Kaufman, R. MO-FG-CAMPUS-IeP2-03: Validation of an SSDE-To-Organ-Dose Calculation Methodology Developed for Pediatric CT in An Adult Population. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957351.
Mead, H, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN, Brady, S, and Kaufman, R. 2016. "MO-FG-CAMPUS-IeP2-03: Validation of an SSDE-To-Organ-Dose Calculation Methodology Developed for Pediatric CT in An Adult Population". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957351.
@article{osti_22653899,
title = {MO-FG-CAMPUS-IeP2-03: Validation of an SSDE-To-Organ-Dose Calculation Methodology Developed for Pediatric CT in An Adult Population},
author = {Mead, H and St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN and Brady, S and Kaufman, R},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To discover if a previously published methodology for estimating patient-specific organ dose in a pediatric population (5–55kg) is translatable to the adult sized patient population (> 55 kg). Methods: An adult male anthropomorphic phantom was scanned with metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters placed at 23 organ locations in the chest and abdominopelvic regions to determine absolute organ dose. Organ-dose-to-SSDE correlation factors were developed by dividing individual phantom organ doses by SSDE of the phantom; where SSDE was calculated at the center of the scan volume of the chest and abdomen/pelvis separately. Organ dose correlation factors developed in phantom were multiplied by 28 chest and 22 abdominopelvic patient SSDE values to estimate organ dose. The median patient weight from the CT examinations was 68.9 kg (range 57–87 kg) and median age was 17 years (range 13–28 years). Calculated organ dose estimates were compared to published Monte Carlo simulated patient and phantom results. Results: Organ-dose-to-SSDE correlation was determined for a total of 23 organs in the chest and abdominopelvic regions. For organs fully covered by the scan volume, correlation in the chest (median 1.3; range 1.1–1.5) and abdominopelvic (median 0.9; range 0.7–1.0) was 1.0 ± 10%. For organs that extended beyond the scan volume (i.e. skin bone marrow and bone surface) correlation was determined to be a median of 0.3 (range 0.1–0.4). Calculated patient organ dose using patient SSDE agreed to better than 6% (chest) and 15% (abdominopelvic) to published values. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that our previous published methodology for calculating organ dose using patient-specific SSDE for the chest and abdominopelvic regions is translatable to adult sized patients for organs fully covered by the scan volume.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4957351},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: The intensive use of Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) during radiotherapy treatments raise some questions about the dose to healthy tissues delivered during image acquisitions. We hence developed a Monte Carlo (MC)-based tool to predict doses to organs delivered by the Elekta XVI kV-CBCT. This work aims at assessing the dosimetric accuracy of the MC tool, in all tissue types. Methods: The kV-CBCT MC model was developed using the PENELOPE code. The beam properties were validated against measured lateral and depth dose profiles in water, and energy spectra measured with a CdTe detector. The CBCT simulator accuracy then required verificationmore » in clinical conditions. For this, we compared calculated and experimental dose values obtained with OSL nanoDots and XRQA2 films inserted in CIRS anthropomorphic phantoms (male, female, and 5-year old child). Measurements were performed at different locations, including bone and lung structures, and for several acquisition protocols: lung, head-and-neck, and pelvis. OSLs and film measurements were corrected when possible for energy dependence, by taking into account for spectral variations between calibration and measurement conditions. Results: Comparisons between measured and MC dose values are summarized in table 1. A mean difference of 8.6% was achieved for OSLs when the energy correction was applied, and 89.3% of the 84 dose points were within uncertainty intervals, including those in bones and lungs. Results with XRQA2 are not as good, because incomplete information about electronic equilibrium in film layers hampered the application of a simple energy correction procedure. Furthermore, measured and calculated doses (Fig.1) are in agreement with the literature. Conclusion: The MC-based tool developed was validated with an extensive set of measurements, and enables the organ dose calculation with accuracy. It can now be used to compute and report doses to organs for clinical cases, and also to drive strategies to optimize imaging protocols.« less
  • Purpose: Investigate the correlation of SSDE with organ dose in a pediatric population. Methods: Four anthropomorphic phantoms, representing a range of pediatric body habitus, were scanned with MOSFET dosimeters placed at 23 organ locations to determine absolute organ dosimetry. Phantom organ dosimetry was divided by phantom SSDE to determine correlation between organ dose and SSDE. Correlation factors were then multiplied by patient SSDE to estimate patient organ dose. Patient demographics consisted of 352 chest and 241 abdominopelvic CT examinations, 22 ± 15 kg (range 5−55 kg) mean weight, and 6 ± 5 years (range 4 mon to 23 years) meanmore » age. Patient organ dose estimates were compared to published pediatric Monte Carlo study results. Results: Phantom effective diameters were matched with patient population effective diameters to within 4 cm. 23 organ correlation factors were determined in the chest and abdominopelvic region across nine pediatric weight subcategories. For organs fully covered by the scan volume, correlation in the chest (average 1.1; range 0.7−1.4) and abdominopelvic (average 0.9; range 0.7−1.3) was near unity. For organs that extended beyond the scan volume (i.e., skin, bone marrow, and bone surface), correlation was determined to be poor (average 0.3; range: 0.1−0.4) for both the chest and abdominopelvic regions, respectively. Pediatric organ dosimetry was compared to published values and was found to agree in the chest to better than an average of 5% (27.6/26.2) and in the abdominopelvic region to better than 2% (73.4/75.0). Conclusion: Average correlation of SSDE and organ dosimetry was found to be better than ± 10% for fully covered organs within the scan volume. This study provides a list of organ dose correlation factors for the chest and abdominopelvic regions, and describes a simple methodology to estimate individual pediatric patient organ dose based on patient SSDE.« less
  • Purpose: To investigate the correlation of size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) with absorbed organ dose, and to develop a simple methodology for estimating patient organ dose in a pediatric population (5–55 kg). Methods: Four physical anthropomorphic phantoms representing a range of pediatric body habitus were scanned with metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters placed at 23 organ locations to determine absolute organ dose. Phantom absolute organ dose was divided by phantom SSDE to determine correlation between organ dose and SSDE. Organ dose correlation factors (CF{sub SSDE}{sup organ}) were then multiplied by patient-specific SSDE to estimate patient organ dose. Themore » CF{sub SSDE}{sup organ} were used to retrospectively estimate individual organ doses from 352 chest and 241 abdominopelvic pediatric CT examinations, where mean patient weight was 22 kg ± 15 (range 5–55 kg), and mean patient age was 6 yrs ± 5 (range 4 months to 23 yrs). Patient organ dose estimates were compared to published pediatric Monte Carlo study results. Results: Phantom effective diameters were matched with patient population effective diameters to within 4 cm; thus, showing appropriate scalability of the phantoms across the entire pediatric population in this study. IndividualCF{sub SSDE}{sup organ} were determined for a total of 23 organs in the chest and abdominopelvic region across nine weight subcategories. For organs fully covered by the scan volume, correlation in the chest (average 1.1; range 0.7–1.4) and abdominopelvic region (average 0.9; range 0.7–1.3) was near unity. For organ/tissue that extended beyond the scan volume (i.e., skin, bone marrow, and bone surface), correlation was determined to be poor (average 0.3; range: 0.1–0.4) for both the chest and abdominopelvic regions, respectively. A means to estimate patient organ dose was demonstrated. Calculated patient organ dose, using patient SSDE and CF{sub SSDE}{sup organ}, was compared to previously published pediatric patient doses that accounted for patient size in their dose calculation, and was found to agree in the chest to better than an average of 5% (27.6/26.2) and in the abdominopelvic region to better than 2% (73.4/75.0). Conclusions: For organs fully covered within the scan volume, the average correlation of SSDE and organ absolute dose was found to be better than ±10%. In addition, this study provides a complete list of organ dose correlation factors (CF{sub SSDE}{sup organ}) for the chest and abdominopelvic regions, and describes a simple methodology to estimate individual pediatric patient organ dose based on patient SSDE.« less
  • Purpose: To validate the accuracy of a Monte Carlo source model of the Siemens SOMATOM Sensation 16 CT scanner using organ doses measured in physical anthropomorphic phantoms. Methods: The x-ray output of the Siemens SOMATOM Sensation 16 multidetector CT scanner was simulated within the Monte Carlo radiation transport code, MCNPX version 2.6. The resulting source model was able to perform various simulated axial and helical computed tomographic (CT) scans of varying scan parameters, including beam energy, filtration, pitch, and beam collimation. Two custom-built anthropomorphic phantoms were used to take dose measurements on the CT scanner: an adult male and amore » 9-month-old. The adult male is a physical replica of University of Florida reference adult male hybrid computational phantom, while the 9-month-old is a replica of University of Florida Series B 9-month-old voxel computational phantom. Each phantom underwent a series of axial and helical CT scans, during which organ doses were measured using fiber-optic coupled plastic scintillator dosimeters developed at University of Florida. The physical setup was reproduced and simulated in MCNPX using the CT source model and the computational phantoms upon which the anthropomorphic phantoms were constructed. Average organ doses were then calculated based upon these MCNPX results. Results: For all CT scans, good agreement was seen between measured and simulated organ doses. For the adult male, the percent differences were within 16% for axial scans, and within 18% for helical scans. For the 9-month-old, the percent differences were all within 15% for both the axial and helical scans. These results are comparable to previously published validation studies using GE scanners and commercially available anthropomorphic phantoms. Conclusions: Overall results of this study show that the Monte Carlo source model can be used to accurately and reliably calculate organ doses for patients undergoing a variety of axial or helical CT examinations on the Siemens SOMATOM Sensation 16 scanner.« less
  • Purpose: To investigate the radiation dose for pediatric high pitch cardiac CTA Methods: A total of 14 cases were included in this study, with mean age of 6.2 years (ranges from 2 months to 15 years). Cardiac CTA was performed using a dual-source CT system (Definition Flash, Siemens). Tube voltage (70, 80 and 100kV) was chosen based on patient weight. All patients were scanned using a high-pitch spiral mode (pitch ranges from 2.5 to 3) with tube current modulation technique (CareDose4D, Siemens). For each case, the three dimensional dose distributions were calculated using a Monte Carlo software package (IMPACT-MC, CTmore » Image GmbH). Scanning parameters of each exam, including tube voltage, tube current, beamshaping filters, beam collimation, were defined in the Monte Carlo calculation. Tube current profile along projection angles was obtained from projection data of each tube, which included data within the over-scanning range along z direction. The volume of lungs was segmented out with CT images (3DSlicer). Lung doses of all patients were calculated and compared with CTDIvol, DLP, and SSDE. Results: The average (range) of CTDIvol, DLP and SSDE of all patients was 1.19 mGy (0.58 to 3.12mGy), 31.54 mGy*cm (12.56 to 99 mGy*cm), 2.26 mGy (1.19 to 6.24 mGy), respectively. Radiation dose to the lungs ranged from 0.83 to 4.18 mGy. Lung doses correlated with CTDIvol, DLP and SSDE with correlation coefficients(k) at 0.98, 0.93, and 0.99. However, for the cases with CTDIvol less than 1mGy, only SSDE preserved a strong correlation with lung doses (k=0.83), while much weaker correlations were found for CTDIvol (k=0.29) and DLP (k=-0.47). Conclusion: Lung doses to pediatric patients during Cardiac CTA were estimated. SSDE showed the most robust correlation with lung doses in contrast to CTDIvol and DLP.« less