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Title: MO-FG-CAMPUS-IeP2-03: Validation of an SSDE-To-Organ-Dose Calculation Methodology Developed for Pediatric CT in An Adult Population

Abstract

Purpose: To discover if a previously published methodology for estimating patient-specific organ dose in a pediatric population (5–55kg) is translatable to the adult sized patient population (> 55 kg). Methods: An adult male anthropomorphic phantom was scanned with metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters placed at 23 organ locations in the chest and abdominopelvic regions to determine absolute organ dose. Organ-dose-to-SSDE correlation factors were developed by dividing individual phantom organ doses by SSDE of the phantom; where SSDE was calculated at the center of the scan volume of the chest and abdomen/pelvis separately. Organ dose correlation factors developed in phantom were multiplied by 28 chest and 22 abdominopelvic patient SSDE values to estimate organ dose. The median patient weight from the CT examinations was 68.9 kg (range 57–87 kg) and median age was 17 years (range 13–28 years). Calculated organ dose estimates were compared to published Monte Carlo simulated patient and phantom results. Results: Organ-dose-to-SSDE correlation was determined for a total of 23 organs in the chest and abdominopelvic regions. For organs fully covered by the scan volume, correlation in the chest (median 1.3; range 1.1–1.5) and abdominopelvic (median 0.9; range 0.7–1.0) was 1.0 ± 10%. For organsmore » that extended beyond the scan volume (i.e. skin bone marrow and bone surface) correlation was determined to be a median of 0.3 (range 0.1–0.4). Calculated patient organ dose using patient SSDE agreed to better than 6% (chest) and 15% (abdominopelvic) to published values. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that our previous published methodology for calculating organ dose using patient-specific SSDE for the chest and abdominopelvic regions is translatable to adult sized patients for organs fully covered by the scan volume.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2]; ;  [3]
  1. Christian Brothers University, Memphis, TN (United States)
  2. (United States)
  3. St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22653899
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; ADULTS; BONE MARROW; CHEST; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; CORRELATIONS; MONTE CARLO METHOD; OXIDES; PATIENTS; PEDIATRICS; PHANTOMS; RADIATION DOSES

Citation Formats

Mead, H, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN, Brady, S, and Kaufman, R. MO-FG-CAMPUS-IeP2-03: Validation of an SSDE-To-Organ-Dose Calculation Methodology Developed for Pediatric CT in An Adult Population. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4957351.
Mead, H, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN, Brady, S, & Kaufman, R. MO-FG-CAMPUS-IeP2-03: Validation of an SSDE-To-Organ-Dose Calculation Methodology Developed for Pediatric CT in An Adult Population. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957351.
Mead, H, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN, Brady, S, and Kaufman, R. Wed . "MO-FG-CAMPUS-IeP2-03: Validation of an SSDE-To-Organ-Dose Calculation Methodology Developed for Pediatric CT in An Adult Population". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957351.
@article{osti_22653899,
title = {MO-FG-CAMPUS-IeP2-03: Validation of an SSDE-To-Organ-Dose Calculation Methodology Developed for Pediatric CT in An Adult Population},
author = {Mead, H and St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN and Brady, S and Kaufman, R},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To discover if a previously published methodology for estimating patient-specific organ dose in a pediatric population (5–55kg) is translatable to the adult sized patient population (> 55 kg). Methods: An adult male anthropomorphic phantom was scanned with metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters placed at 23 organ locations in the chest and abdominopelvic regions to determine absolute organ dose. Organ-dose-to-SSDE correlation factors were developed by dividing individual phantom organ doses by SSDE of the phantom; where SSDE was calculated at the center of the scan volume of the chest and abdomen/pelvis separately. Organ dose correlation factors developed in phantom were multiplied by 28 chest and 22 abdominopelvic patient SSDE values to estimate organ dose. The median patient weight from the CT examinations was 68.9 kg (range 57–87 kg) and median age was 17 years (range 13–28 years). Calculated organ dose estimates were compared to published Monte Carlo simulated patient and phantom results. Results: Organ-dose-to-SSDE correlation was determined for a total of 23 organs in the chest and abdominopelvic regions. For organs fully covered by the scan volume, correlation in the chest (median 1.3; range 1.1–1.5) and abdominopelvic (median 0.9; range 0.7–1.0) was 1.0 ± 10%. For organs that extended beyond the scan volume (i.e. skin bone marrow and bone surface) correlation was determined to be a median of 0.3 (range 0.1–0.4). Calculated patient organ dose using patient SSDE agreed to better than 6% (chest) and 15% (abdominopelvic) to published values. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that our previous published methodology for calculating organ dose using patient-specific SSDE for the chest and abdominopelvic regions is translatable to adult sized patients for organs fully covered by the scan volume.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4957351},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
  • Purpose: Investigate the correlation of SSDE with organ dose in a pediatric population. Methods: Four anthropomorphic phantoms, representing a range of pediatric body habitus, were scanned with MOSFET dosimeters placed at 23 organ locations to determine absolute organ dosimetry. Phantom organ dosimetry was divided by phantom SSDE to determine correlation between organ dose and SSDE. Correlation factors were then multiplied by patient SSDE to estimate patient organ dose. Patient demographics consisted of 352 chest and 241 abdominopelvic CT examinations, 22 ± 15 kg (range 5−55 kg) mean weight, and 6 ± 5 years (range 4 mon to 23 years) meanmore » age. Patient organ dose estimates were compared to published pediatric Monte Carlo study results. Results: Phantom effective diameters were matched with patient population effective diameters to within 4 cm. 23 organ correlation factors were determined in the chest and abdominopelvic region across nine pediatric weight subcategories. For organs fully covered by the scan volume, correlation in the chest (average 1.1; range 0.7−1.4) and abdominopelvic (average 0.9; range 0.7−1.3) was near unity. For organs that extended beyond the scan volume (i.e., skin, bone marrow, and bone surface), correlation was determined to be poor (average 0.3; range: 0.1−0.4) for both the chest and abdominopelvic regions, respectively. Pediatric organ dosimetry was compared to published values and was found to agree in the chest to better than an average of 5% (27.6/26.2) and in the abdominopelvic region to better than 2% (73.4/75.0). Conclusion: Average correlation of SSDE and organ dosimetry was found to be better than ± 10% for fully covered organs within the scan volume. This study provides a list of organ dose correlation factors for the chest and abdominopelvic regions, and describes a simple methodology to estimate individual pediatric patient organ dose based on patient SSDE.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of size-specific dose estimates (SSDE) in CT in the presence of simulated metal prostheses. Methods: Radiation dose in tissue (f-factor = 0.94) was measured at various chamber positions in a conventional nested CTDI phantom with nominal 0.5 inch metal rods inserted to simulate the presence of prosthetic implant(s). An average weighted tissue dose (AWTD) was calculated in a manner similar to CTDIw. Subsequent scans were performed with varying phantom diameter, number of metal rods and type of metal. The scan acquisition parameters were fixed for all such measurements (i.e. CTDIvol was constant). Axial CT imagesmore » reconstructed both with and without a metal artifact reduction algorithm (SEMAR) were used to calculate the water-equivalent diameter (Dw) per AAPM TG Report 220. The Dw values were subsequently used to determine the SSDE from the known CTDIvol. In addition SSDE was also calculated from the effective diameter per AAPM TG Report 204. Accuracy of the calculated SSDE values were assessed by comparing to the AWTD measurements. Results: In the 32-cm diameter phantom the SSDE calculations from Dw (TG-220) were within ±1% of the AWTD measurements regardless of type of metal and number of metal rods while SSDE calculated from effective diameter (TG-204) overestimated the AWTD by 7–10%. In the 16-cm diameter phantom the SSDE calculations from Dw (TG-220) were within ±4% of the AWTD measurement. The Dw calculations used to determine SSDE varied by less than 0.2% between the images reconstructed with and without the metal artifact reduction algorithm. Conclusion: The TG-220 SSDE method can provide an accurate estimation of tissue dose in the presence of metal while TG-204 SSDE method overestimates the dose. The determination of Dw is independent of reconstruction algorithm.« less
  • Purpose: The intensive use of Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) during radiotherapy treatments raise some questions about the dose to healthy tissues delivered during image acquisitions. We hence developed a Monte Carlo (MC)-based tool to predict doses to organs delivered by the Elekta XVI kV-CBCT. This work aims at assessing the dosimetric accuracy of the MC tool, in all tissue types. Methods: The kV-CBCT MC model was developed using the PENELOPE code. The beam properties were validated against measured lateral and depth dose profiles in water, and energy spectra measured with a CdTe detector. The CBCT simulator accuracy then required verificationmore » in clinical conditions. For this, we compared calculated and experimental dose values obtained with OSL nanoDots and XRQA2 films inserted in CIRS anthropomorphic phantoms (male, female, and 5-year old child). Measurements were performed at different locations, including bone and lung structures, and for several acquisition protocols: lung, head-and-neck, and pelvis. OSLs and film measurements were corrected when possible for energy dependence, by taking into account for spectral variations between calibration and measurement conditions. Results: Comparisons between measured and MC dose values are summarized in table 1. A mean difference of 8.6% was achieved for OSLs when the energy correction was applied, and 89.3% of the 84 dose points were within uncertainty intervals, including those in bones and lungs. Results with XRQA2 are not as good, because incomplete information about electronic equilibrium in film layers hampered the application of a simple energy correction procedure. Furthermore, measured and calculated doses (Fig.1) are in agreement with the literature. Conclusion: The MC-based tool developed was validated with an extensive set of measurements, and enables the organ dose calculation with accuracy. It can now be used to compute and report doses to organs for clinical cases, and also to drive strategies to optimize imaging protocols.« less
  • Purpose: To validate Computed Tomography Fractional Flow Reserve (CT-FFR) measurements with accurate 3D printed coronary phantoms. Methods: DICOM data from four phases in two patients imaged with a standard 320 × 0.5mm coronary CT acquisition (70–80% cardiac cycle) underwent semi-automated segmentation using a research workstation. Both patients had a >50% stenosis from the clinical image interpretation. Each volume was saved as a Stereo Lithographic (STL) file with 250 micron resolution. The 3D geometries were qualitatively assessed; the best of the four phases was 3D printed using a Stratasys Eden260V printer in Tango+, a rubber-like material that roughly emulates mechanical propertiesmore » of human vasculature. We connected the model to a programmable pump and measured the pressure drop using pressure sensors embedded proximal and distal to the arterial stenosis. Next, the STL files used for the 3D printed models were uploaded in the ANSYS meshing tool (ICEM CFD 16.1). A standard meshing process was applied and the meshed geometry was directly imported in the ANSYS Fluent for Computational Flow Dynamics simulations. The CFD simulations were used to calculate the CT-FFR and compared to the bench top FFR measured in the 3D printed phantoms. Results: FFR-CT measurements and phantoms were completed in within an hour after the segmentation. Patient 1 had a 60% stenosis that resulted in a CT-FFR of 0.68. The second case had a 50% stenosis and a CT-FFR of 0.75. The average bench top FFR measurements were 0.72 and 0.80, respectively. Conclusion: This pilot investigation demonstrated the use of a bench-top coronary model for CT-FFR validation. The measurements and the CFD simulations agreed within 6%. Project supported by Support: Toshiba America Medical Systems Corp.and NIH grant R01-EB002873. Project supported by Toshiba America Medical Systems Corp.and partial support from NIH grant R01-EB002873.« less
  • Purpose: To investigate the correlation of size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) with absorbed organ dose, and to develop a simple methodology for estimating patient organ dose in a pediatric population (5–55 kg). Methods: Four physical anthropomorphic phantoms representing a range of pediatric body habitus were scanned with metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters placed at 23 organ locations to determine absolute organ dose. Phantom absolute organ dose was divided by phantom SSDE to determine correlation between organ dose and SSDE. Organ dose correlation factors (CF{sub SSDE}{sup organ}) were then multiplied by patient-specific SSDE to estimate patient organ dose. Themore » CF{sub SSDE}{sup organ} were used to retrospectively estimate individual organ doses from 352 chest and 241 abdominopelvic pediatric CT examinations, where mean patient weight was 22 kg ± 15 (range 5–55 kg), and mean patient age was 6 yrs ± 5 (range 4 months to 23 yrs). Patient organ dose estimates were compared to published pediatric Monte Carlo study results. Results: Phantom effective diameters were matched with patient population effective diameters to within 4 cm; thus, showing appropriate scalability of the phantoms across the entire pediatric population in this study. IndividualCF{sub SSDE}{sup organ} were determined for a total of 23 organs in the chest and abdominopelvic region across nine weight subcategories. For organs fully covered by the scan volume, correlation in the chest (average 1.1; range 0.7–1.4) and abdominopelvic region (average 0.9; range 0.7–1.3) was near unity. For organ/tissue that extended beyond the scan volume (i.e., skin, bone marrow, and bone surface), correlation was determined to be poor (average 0.3; range: 0.1–0.4) for both the chest and abdominopelvic regions, respectively. A means to estimate patient organ dose was demonstrated. Calculated patient organ dose, using patient SSDE and CF{sub SSDE}{sup organ}, was compared to previously published pediatric patient doses that accounted for patient size in their dose calculation, and was found to agree in the chest to better than an average of 5% (27.6/26.2) and in the abdominopelvic region to better than 2% (73.4/75.0). Conclusions: For organs fully covered within the scan volume, the average correlation of SSDE and organ absolute dose was found to be better than ±10%. In addition, this study provides a complete list of organ dose correlation factors (CF{sub SSDE}{sup organ}) for the chest and abdominopelvic regions, and describes a simple methodology to estimate individual pediatric patient organ dose based on patient SSDE.« less