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Title: MO-FG-CAMPUS-JeP1-03: Luminescence Imaging of Water During Proton Beam Irradiation for Range Estimation

Abstract

Purpose: Since proton therapy has the ability to selectively deliver a dose to a target tumor, the dose distribution should be accurately measured. A precise and efficient method to evaluate the dose distribution is desired. We found that luminescence was emitted from water during proton irradiation and thought this phenomenon could be used for estimating the dose distribution. Methods: For this purpose, we placed water phantoms set on a table with a spot-scanning proton-therapy system, and luminescence images of these phantoms were measured with a high-sensitivity cooled charge coupled device (CCD) camera during proton-beam irradiation. We also conducted the imaging of phantoms of pure-water, fluorescein solution and acrylic block. We made three dimensional images from the projection data. Results: The luminescence images of water phantoms during the proton-beam irradiations showed clear Bragg peaks, and the measured proton ranges from the images were almost the same as those obtained with an ionization chamber. The image of the pure-water phantom also showed almost the same distribution as the tap-water phantom, indicating that the luminescence image was not related to impurities in the water. The luminescence image of fluorescein solution had ∼3 times higher intensity than water, with the same proton range asmore » that of water. The luminescence image of the acrylic phantom had 14.5% shorter proton range than that of water; the proton range in the acrylic phantom was relatively matched with the calculated value. The luminescence images of the tap-water phantom during proton irradiation could be obtained in less than 2 sec. Three dimensional images were successfully obtained which have more quantitative information. Conclusion: Luminescence imaging during proton-beam irradiation has the potential to be a new method for range estimations in proton therapy.« less

Authors:
;  [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi (Japan)
  2. Nagoya Proton Therapy Center, Nagoya, Aichi (Japan)
  3. Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22653890
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; CHARGE-COUPLED DEVICES; DRINKING WATER; IMAGES; IONIZATION CHAMBERS; IRRADIATION; LUMINESCENCE; MATHEMATICAL SOLUTIONS; PHANTOMS; PROTON BEAMS; RADIATION DOSE DISTRIBUTIONS; RADIOTHERAPY; THREE-DIMENSIONAL CALCULATIONS

Citation Formats

Yamamoto, S, Komori, M, Toshito, T, and Watabe, H. MO-FG-CAMPUS-JeP1-03: Luminescence Imaging of Water During Proton Beam Irradiation for Range Estimation. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4957340.
Yamamoto, S, Komori, M, Toshito, T, & Watabe, H. MO-FG-CAMPUS-JeP1-03: Luminescence Imaging of Water During Proton Beam Irradiation for Range Estimation. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957340.
Yamamoto, S, Komori, M, Toshito, T, and Watabe, H. 2016. "MO-FG-CAMPUS-JeP1-03: Luminescence Imaging of Water During Proton Beam Irradiation for Range Estimation". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957340.
@article{osti_22653890,
title = {MO-FG-CAMPUS-JeP1-03: Luminescence Imaging of Water During Proton Beam Irradiation for Range Estimation},
author = {Yamamoto, S and Komori, M and Toshito, T and Watabe, H},
abstractNote = {Purpose: Since proton therapy has the ability to selectively deliver a dose to a target tumor, the dose distribution should be accurately measured. A precise and efficient method to evaluate the dose distribution is desired. We found that luminescence was emitted from water during proton irradiation and thought this phenomenon could be used for estimating the dose distribution. Methods: For this purpose, we placed water phantoms set on a table with a spot-scanning proton-therapy system, and luminescence images of these phantoms were measured with a high-sensitivity cooled charge coupled device (CCD) camera during proton-beam irradiation. We also conducted the imaging of phantoms of pure-water, fluorescein solution and acrylic block. We made three dimensional images from the projection data. Results: The luminescence images of water phantoms during the proton-beam irradiations showed clear Bragg peaks, and the measured proton ranges from the images were almost the same as those obtained with an ionization chamber. The image of the pure-water phantom also showed almost the same distribution as the tap-water phantom, indicating that the luminescence image was not related to impurities in the water. The luminescence image of fluorescein solution had ∼3 times higher intensity than water, with the same proton range as that of water. The luminescence image of the acrylic phantom had 14.5% shorter proton range than that of water; the proton range in the acrylic phantom was relatively matched with the calculated value. The luminescence images of the tap-water phantom during proton irradiation could be obtained in less than 2 sec. Three dimensional images were successfully obtained which have more quantitative information. Conclusion: Luminescence imaging during proton-beam irradiation has the potential to be a new method for range estimations in proton therapy.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4957340},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: Proton therapy has the ability to selectively deliver a dose to the target tumor, so the dose distribution should be accurately measured by a precise and efficient method. The authors found that luminescence was emitted from water during proton irradiation and conjectured that this phenomenon could be used for estimating the dose distribution. Methods: To achieve more accurate dose distribution, the authors set water phantoms on a table with a spot scanning proton therapy system and measured the luminescence images of these phantoms with a high-sensitivity, cooled charge coupled device camera during proton-beam irradiation. The authors imaged the phantomsmore » of pure water, fluorescein solution, and an acrylic block. Results: The luminescence images of water phantoms taken during proton-beam irradiation showed clear Bragg peaks, and the measured proton ranges from the images were almost the same as those obtained with an ionization chamber. Furthermore, the image of the pure-water phantom showed almost the same distribution as the tap-water phantom, indicating that the luminescence image was not related to impurities in the water. The luminescence image of the fluorescein solution had ∼3 times higher intensity than water, with the same proton range as that of water. The luminescence image of the acrylic phantom had a 14.5% shorter proton range than that of water; the proton range in the acrylic phantom generally matched the calculated value. The luminescence images of the tap-water phantom during proton irradiation could be obtained in less than 2 s. Conclusions: Luminescence imaging during proton-beam irradiation is promising as an effective method for range estimation in proton therapy.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate and characterize a multi-slit collimated imaging system for use in prompt gamma range verification of proton therapy. Methods: Acrylic (PMMA) targets were irradiated with a 50 MeV proton beam. With the collimator placed 13 cm from the beam axis, photons of energy from 2–7 MeV were measured. Image reconstruction provided 2-dimensional distribution of gamma rays. Estimated Bragg peak location was compared with 1-dimensional profiles of photon images. Shifts in Bragg peak were simulated by physically moving the targets in 1 mm increments. Results: The imaging system measured prompt gamma emissions resulting from a 50 MeV proton beam,more » at currents up to 2 nA, incident on a PMMA target. Overall system detection efficiency was approximately 2.6×10{sup −5} gamma/proton. With delivery of 1×10{sup 11} protons, shifts of 1 mm in the target location were detected in 2D prompt gamma images and 1D profiles. With delivery of 1×10{sup 8} protons, shifts of approximately 3 mm were detectable. Conclusion: This work has characterized the performance of a prototype multi-slit collimated imaging system. The system can produce 2D images of prompt gamma distributions and detect shifts in Bragg peak location down to 1 mm. These results encourage further development and optimization of the system for clinical proton beam applications. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number: DENA0000979 through the Nuclear Science and Security Consortium.« less
  • Purpose: Prompt gammas are emitted along the proton beam path and have an emission profile correlated with the depth dose profile. In this study, the accuracy of in-vivo proton range verification using a 1-D prompt gamma camera is assessed. Methods: The 1-D camera is comprised of a tungsten slit collimator positioned in front of a linear array of LYSO scintillating crystals coupled to silicon photomultipliers. The imaged gamma profiles of individual pencil beam spots and energy layers were analyzed by determining the relative shifts from the expected gamma profiles based on analytic prediction or reference measurements. The range retrieval precisionmore » was evaluated by reproducibility measurements and by irradiation through a heterogeneous phantom composed of materials with known stopping power ratios. The camera was evaluated at clinical doses in pencil beam scanning mode on a head-and-neck phantom (HN). Two scenarios were studied: 5 mm systematic range error; and setup error of 10 mm transverse to the proton beam. Results: The camera range retrieval precision was 2 mm at clinical doses. For the heterogeneous phantom and HN phantom studies, the discrepancies between the analytic model and measurements were less than 2 mm for both spot and iso-energy layer analysis. For the simulated 5 mm range error, the retrieved shifts were 4.3±2.0 mm. For the 10 mm setup error, large shifts (> 4 mm) were observed for some spots due to differences in the irradiated and expected beam path from the measurements without setup error. Conclusion: Our studies demonstrated that in-vivo proton range verification is feasible using a 1D prompt gamma camera with a 2 mm range retrieval precision. Pencil beam spot under or over ranging can be detected via comparison between measured and expected profiles.« less
  • Purpose: The authors previously reported successful luminescence imaging of water during proton irradiation and its application to range estimation. However, since the feasibility of this approach for carbon-ion irradiation remained unclear, the authors conducted luminescence imaging during carbon-ion irradiation and estimated the ranges. Methods: The authors placed a pure-water phantom on the patient couch of a carbon-ion therapy system and measured the luminescence images with a high-sensitivity, cooled charge-coupled device camera during carbon-ion irradiation. The authors also carried out imaging of three types of phantoms (tap-water, an acrylic block, and a plastic scintillator) and compared their intensities and distributions withmore » those of a phantom containing pure-water. Results: The luminescence images of pure-water phantoms during carbon-ion irradiation showed clear Bragg peaks, and the measured carbon-ion ranges from the images were almost the same as those obtained by simulation. The image of the tap-water phantom showed almost the same distribution as that of the pure-water phantom. The acrylic block phantom’s luminescence image produced seven times higher luminescence and had a 13% shorter range than that of the water phantoms; the range with the acrylic phantom generally matched the calculated value. The plastic scintillator showed ∼15 000 times higher light than that of water. Conclusions: Luminescence imaging during carbon-ion irradiation of water is not only possible but also a promising method for range estimation in carbon-ion therapy.« less
  • Purpose: Range uncertainty from X-ray CT number conversion to stopping power ratio (SPR) is one of the key factors limiting the potential of proton therapy. The large margins required for deep seated tumors degrade the organ sparing achievable with the technology. Of interest is the application of dual energy CT (DECT) to SPR estimation. In this planning study proton range differences between SECT and DECT have been quantified for brain cases. Methods: A last generation dual source DECT scanner was used to acquire SECT (150 kVp with Sn filtration) and DECT (additionally 90 kVp) scans of phantoms and 5 headmore » trauma patients, acting as surrogate cancer patients. Phantom materials were characterized in terms of SPR in a particle beam to obtain reference values. IMPT treatment plans were generated on the basis of SECT and DECT SPR images for hypothetical brain tumors using a short and a long beam path. Range differences between SECT and DECT from plan recalculations were evaluated in beam-eye-view (BEV) by comparing the 80% isodose. Results: For the 18 phantom materials the SECT RMS SPR errors were 2.6% compared to 1.1% for DECT. Group median relative range differences between SECT and DECT plans were −1.0% for the short beam path over the 5 patients investigated in this study. For the long beam path the median difference was −1.4%. These relative range differences corresponded to −0.5 mm and −1.4 mm shifts respectively. Conclusion: This is the first study performing proton therapy treatment planning on DECT patient images. Important range differences of more than 1 mm were observed between SECT and DECT treatment plans, and DECT SPR accuracy was found superior on the basis of phantom measurements. While the patients investigated in this study did not have brain tumors, the findings we observed should apply to cancer patients. Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (MAP); Bundesministerium fur Bildung und Forschung (01IB13001)« less