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Title: MO-FG-BRA-06: Electromagnetic Beacon Insertion in Lung Cancer Patients and Resultant Surrogacy Errors for Dynamic MLC Tumour Tracking

Abstract

Purpose: To assess endo-bronchial electromagnetic beacon insertion and to quantify the geometric accuracy of using beacons as a surrogate for tumour motion in real-time multileaf collimator (MLC) tracking of lung tumours. Methods: The LIGHT SABR trial is a world-first clinical trial in which the MLC leaves move with lung tumours in real time on a standard linear accelerator. Tracking is performed based on implanted electromagnetic beacons (CalypsoTM, Varian Medical Systems, USA) as a surrogate for tumour motion. Five patients have been treated and have each had three beacons implanted endo-bronchially under fluoroscopic guidance. The centre of mass (C.O.M) has been used to adapt the MLC in real-time. The geometric error in using the beacon C.O.M as a surrogate for tumour motion was measured by measuring the tumour and beacon C.O.M in all phases of the respiratory cycle of a 4DCT. The surrogacy error was defined as the difference in beacon and tumour C.O.M relative to the reference phase (maximum exhale). Results: All five patients have had three beacons successfully implanted with no migration between simulation and end of treatment. Beacon placement relative to tumour C.O.M varied from 14 to 74 mm and in one patient spanned two lobes. Surrogacy errormore » was measured in each patient on the simulation 4DCT and ranged from 0 to 3 mm. Surrogacy error as measured on 4DCT was subject to artefacts in mid-ventilation phases. Surrogacy error was a function of breathing phase and was typically larger at maximum inhale. Conclusion: Beacon placement and thus surrogacy error is a major component of geometric uncertainty in MLC tracking of lung tumours. Surrogacy error must be measured on each patient and incorporated into margin calculation. Reduction of surrogacy error is limited by airway anatomy, however should be taken into consideration when performing beacon insertion and planning. This research is funded by Varian Medical Systems via a collaborative research agreement.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1]; ;  [2];  [3]
  1. Royal North Shore Hospital, St. Leonards, NSW (Australia)
  2. University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia)
  3. Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, NSW (Australia)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22653869
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; CLINICAL TRIALS; ERRORS; GEOMETRY; LINEAR ACCELERATORS; LUNGS; NEOPLASMS; PATIENTS; VISIBLE RADIATION

Citation Formats

Hardcastle, N, Booth, J, Caillet, V, Haddad, C, Crasta, C, O’Brien, R, Keall, P, and Szymura, K. MO-FG-BRA-06: Electromagnetic Beacon Insertion in Lung Cancer Patients and Resultant Surrogacy Errors for Dynamic MLC Tumour Tracking. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4957299.
Hardcastle, N, Booth, J, Caillet, V, Haddad, C, Crasta, C, O’Brien, R, Keall, P, & Szymura, K. MO-FG-BRA-06: Electromagnetic Beacon Insertion in Lung Cancer Patients and Resultant Surrogacy Errors for Dynamic MLC Tumour Tracking. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957299.
Hardcastle, N, Booth, J, Caillet, V, Haddad, C, Crasta, C, O’Brien, R, Keall, P, and Szymura, K. 2016. "MO-FG-BRA-06: Electromagnetic Beacon Insertion in Lung Cancer Patients and Resultant Surrogacy Errors for Dynamic MLC Tumour Tracking". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957299.
@article{osti_22653869,
title = {MO-FG-BRA-06: Electromagnetic Beacon Insertion in Lung Cancer Patients and Resultant Surrogacy Errors for Dynamic MLC Tumour Tracking},
author = {Hardcastle, N and Booth, J and Caillet, V and Haddad, C and Crasta, C and O’Brien, R and Keall, P and Szymura, K},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To assess endo-bronchial electromagnetic beacon insertion and to quantify the geometric accuracy of using beacons as a surrogate for tumour motion in real-time multileaf collimator (MLC) tracking of lung tumours. Methods: The LIGHT SABR trial is a world-first clinical trial in which the MLC leaves move with lung tumours in real time on a standard linear accelerator. Tracking is performed based on implanted electromagnetic beacons (CalypsoTM, Varian Medical Systems, USA) as a surrogate for tumour motion. Five patients have been treated and have each had three beacons implanted endo-bronchially under fluoroscopic guidance. The centre of mass (C.O.M) has been used to adapt the MLC in real-time. The geometric error in using the beacon C.O.M as a surrogate for tumour motion was measured by measuring the tumour and beacon C.O.M in all phases of the respiratory cycle of a 4DCT. The surrogacy error was defined as the difference in beacon and tumour C.O.M relative to the reference phase (maximum exhale). Results: All five patients have had three beacons successfully implanted with no migration between simulation and end of treatment. Beacon placement relative to tumour C.O.M varied from 14 to 74 mm and in one patient spanned two lobes. Surrogacy error was measured in each patient on the simulation 4DCT and ranged from 0 to 3 mm. Surrogacy error as measured on 4DCT was subject to artefacts in mid-ventilation phases. Surrogacy error was a function of breathing phase and was typically larger at maximum inhale. Conclusion: Beacon placement and thus surrogacy error is a major component of geometric uncertainty in MLC tracking of lung tumours. Surrogacy error must be measured on each patient and incorporated into margin calculation. Reduction of surrogacy error is limited by airway anatomy, however should be taken into consideration when performing beacon insertion and planning. This research is funded by Varian Medical Systems via a collaborative research agreement.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4957299},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: To develop a formulation for 4D treatment planning for a tumour tracking volumetric modulated arc therapy treatment (VMAT) plan for lung cancer. Methods: A VMAT plan was optimized based on a reference phase of the 4DCT of a lung cancer patient. The PTV was generated from the GTV of the reference phase. The collimator angle was set to 90 degrees such that the MLC travels along superior-inferior direction which is the main component of movement of a lung tumour. Then, each control point of the VMAT plan was assigned to a particular phase of the 4DCT in chronological order.more » The MLC positions of each control point were shifted according to the position of the tumour centroid of its assigned phase to form a tumour tracking VMAT plan. The control points of the same phase were grouped to form a pseudo VMAT plan for that particular phase. Dose calculation was performed for each pseudo VMAT plan on the corresponding phase of the 4DCT. The CTs of all phases were registered to the reference phase CT according to the displacement of the tumour centroid. The individual dose distributions of the pseudo VMAT plans were summed up and displayed on the reference phase of the 4DCT. A control VMAT plan was optimized based on a PTV generated from the ITV of all phases and compared with the tumour tracking VMAT plan. Results: Both plans achieved >95% volume coverage at the prescription dose level (96% for the tumour tracking plan and 97% for the control plan). But the normal lung volume irradiated at the prescription dose level was 39% less for the tumour tracking plan than the control plan. Conclusion: A formulation of 4D treatment planning for tumour tracking VMAT plans for lung cancer was developed.« less
  • PurposeTo correlate prostate-specific antigen (PSA), free to total PSA percentage (fPSA%) and prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) levels from peripheral and pelvic venous samples with prostatectomy specimens in patients with prostate adenocarcinoma and borderline elevation of PSA.Materials and MethodsIn this prospective institutional review board approved study, 7 patients with biopsy proven prostate cancer had a venous sampling procedure prior to prostatectomy (mean 3.2 days, range 1–7). Venous samples were taken from a peripheral vein (PVS), the right internal iliac vein, a deep right internal iliac vein branch, left internal iliac vein and a deep left internal iliac vein branch. Venous sampling resultsmore » were compared to tumour volume, laterality, stage and grade in prostatectomy surgical specimens.ResultsMean PVS PSA was 4.29, range 2.3–6 ng/ml. PSA and PAP values in PVS did not differ significantly from internal iliac or deep internal iliac vein samples (p > 0.05). fPSA% was significantly higher in internal iliac (p = 0.004) and deep internal iliac (p = 0.003) vein samples compared to PVS. One of 7 patients had unilateral tumour only. This patient, with left–sided tumour, had a fPSA% of 6, 6, 6, 14 and 12 in his peripheral, right internal iliac, deep right internal iliac branch, left internal iliac and deep left internal iliac branch samples respectively. There were no adverse events.ConclusionfPSA%, unlike total PSA or PAP, is significantly higher in pelvic vein compared to peripheral vein samples when prostate cancer is present. Larger studies including patients with higher PSA values are warranted to further investigate this counterintuitive finding.« less
  • Purpose: PET-guided dynamic tumor tracking is a novel concept of biologically targeted image guidance for radiotherapy. A dynamic tumor tracking algorithm based on list-mode PET data has been developed and previously tested on dynamic phantom data. In this study, we investigate if dynamic tumor tracking is clinically feasible by applying the method to lung cancer patient PET data. Methods: PET-guided tumor tracking estimates the target position of a segmented volume in PET images reconstructed continuously from accumulated coincidence events correlated with external respiratory motion, simulating real-time applications, i.e., only data up to the current time point is used to estimatemore » the target position. A target volume is segmented with a 50% threshold, consistently, of the maximum intensity in the predetermined volume of interest. Through this algorithm, the PET-estimated trajectories are quantified from four lung cancer patients who have distinct tumor location and size. The accuracy of the PET-estimated trajectories is evaluated by comparing to external respiratory motion because the ground-truth of tumor motion is not known in patients; however, previous phantom studies demonstrated sub-2mm accuracy using clinically derived 3D tumor motion. Results: The overall similarity of motion patterns between the PET-estimated trajectories and the external respiratory traces implies that the PET-guided tracking algorithm can provide an acceptable level of targeting accuracy. However, there are variations in the tracking accuracy between tumors due to the quality of the segmentation which depends on target-to-background ratio, tumor location and size. Conclusion: For the first time, a dynamic tumor tracking algorithm has been applied to lung cancer patient PET data, demonstrating clinical feasibility of real-time tumor tracking for integrated PET-linacs. The target-to-background ratio is a significant factor determining accuracy: screening during treatment planning would enable appropriate patient selection for PET-guided dynamic tumor tracking in radiotherapy.« less
  • Purpose: Tumor hypoxia is correlated with treatment failure. To date, there are no published studies investigating hypoxia in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients undergoing SBRT. We aim to use 18F-fluoromisonidazole (18F-FMISO) positron emission tomography (PET) imaging to non-invasively quantify the tumor hypoxic volume (HV), to elucidate potential roles of reoxygenation and tumor vascular response at high doses, and to identify an optimal prognostic imaging time-point. Methods: SBRT-eligible patients with NSCLC tumors >1cm were prospectively enrolled in an IRB-approved study. Computed Tomography and dynamic PET images (0–120min, 150–180min, and 210–240min post-injection) were acquired using a Siemens BiographmCT PET/CT scanner. 18F-FMISOmore » PET was performed on a single patient at 3 different time points around a single SBRT delivery of 18 Gy and HVs were compared using a tumor-to-blood ratio (TBR)>1.2 and rate of influx (Ki)>0.0015 (Patlak). Results: Results from our first patient showed substantial temporal changes in HV following SBRT. Using a TBR threshold >1.2 and summed images 210–240min, the HVs were 19%, 31% and 13% of total tumor volume on day 0, 2 (48 hours post-SBRT), and 4 (96 hours post-SBRT). The absolute volume of hypoxia increased by nearly a factor of 2 after 18 Gy and then decreased almost to baseline 96 hours later. Selected imaging timepoints resulted in temporal changes in HV quantification obtained with TBR. Ki, calculated using 4-hour dynamic data, evaluated HVs as 22%, 75% and 21%, respectively. Conclusions: ith the results of only one patient, this novel pilot study highlights the potential benefit of 18F-FMISO PET imaging as results indicate substantial temporal changes in tumor HV post-SBRT. Analysis suggests that TBR is not a robust parameter for accurate HV quantification and heavily influenced by imaging timepoint selection. Kinetic modeling parameters are more sensitive and may aid in future treatment individualization based on patient-specific biological information.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate the effect of inter- and intra-fractional tumor motion on the error in four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) maximal intensity projection (MIP)–based lung tumor internal target volumes (ITV), using deformable image registration of real-time 2D-sagital cine-mode MRI acquired during lung SBRT treatments. Methods: Five lung tumor patients underwent free breathing SBRT treatment on the ViewRay, with dose prescribed to PTV (4DCT MIP-based ITV+3–6mm margin). Sagittal slice cine-MR images (3.5×3.5mm pixels) were acquired through the center of the tumor at 4 frames per second throughout the treatments (3–4 fractions of 21–32 minutes duration). Tumor GTVs were contoured on the firstmore » frame of the cine and tracked throughout the treatment using off-line optical-flow based deformable registration implemented on a GPU cluster. Pseudo-4DCT MIP-based ITVs were generated from MIPs of the deformed GTV contours limited to short segments of image data. All possible pseudo-4DCT MIP-based ITV volumes were generated with 1s resolution and compared to the ITV volume of the entire treatment course. Varying pseudo-4DCT durations from 10-50s were analyzed. Results: Tumors were covered in their entirety by PTV in the patients analysed here. However, pseudo-4DCT based ITV volumes were observed that were as small as 29% of the entire treatment-ITV, depending on breathing irregularity and the duration of pseudo-4DCT. With an increase in duration of pseudo-4DCT from 10–50s the minimum volume acquired from 95% of all pseudo-4DCTs increased from 62%–81% of the treatment ITV. Conclusion: A 4DCT MIP-based ITV offers a ‘snap-shot’ of breathing motion for the brief period of time the tumor is imaged on a specific day. Real time MRI over prolonged periods of time and over multiple treatment fractions shows that the accuracy of this snap-shot varies according to inter- and intra-fractional tumor motion. Further work is required to investigate the dosimetric effect of these results.« less