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Title: MO-E-BRC-03: Fast Online Replanning Techniques

Abstract

Online adaptive radiation therapy has the potential to ensure delivery of optimal treatment to the patient by accounting for anatomical and potentially functional changes that occur from one fraction to the next and over the course of treatment. While on-line adaptive RT (ART) has been a topic of many publications, discussions, and research, it has until very recently remained largely a concept and not a practical implementation. However, recent advances in on-table imaging, use of deformable image registration for contour generation and dose tracking, faster and more efficient plan optimization, as well as fast quality assurance method has enabled the implementation of ART in the clinic in the past couple of years. The introduction of these tools into routine clinical use requires many considerations and progressive knowledge to understand how processes that have historically taken hours/days to complete can now be done in less than 30 minutes. This session will discuss considerations to perform real time contouring, planning and patient specific QA, as well as a practical workflow and the required resources. Learning Objectives: To understand the difficulties, challenges and available technologies for online adaptive RT. To understand how to implement online adaptive therapy in a clinical environment and tomore » understand the workflow and resources required. To understand the limitations and sources of uncertainty in the online adaptive process I have research funding from ViewRay Inc. and Philips Medical Systems.; R. Kashani, I have research funding from ViewRay Inc. and Philips Medical Systems.; X. Li, Research supported by Elekta Inc.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Medical College of Wisconsin (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22653842
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; IMPLEMENTATION; QUALITY ASSURANCE; RADIOTHERAPY

Citation Formats

Li, X. MO-E-BRC-03: Fast Online Replanning Techniques. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4957271.
Li, X. MO-E-BRC-03: Fast Online Replanning Techniques. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957271.
Li, X. 2016. "MO-E-BRC-03: Fast Online Replanning Techniques". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957271.
@article{osti_22653842,
title = {MO-E-BRC-03: Fast Online Replanning Techniques},
author = {Li, X.},
abstractNote = {Online adaptive radiation therapy has the potential to ensure delivery of optimal treatment to the patient by accounting for anatomical and potentially functional changes that occur from one fraction to the next and over the course of treatment. While on-line adaptive RT (ART) has been a topic of many publications, discussions, and research, it has until very recently remained largely a concept and not a practical implementation. However, recent advances in on-table imaging, use of deformable image registration for contour generation and dose tracking, faster and more efficient plan optimization, as well as fast quality assurance method has enabled the implementation of ART in the clinic in the past couple of years. The introduction of these tools into routine clinical use requires many considerations and progressive knowledge to understand how processes that have historically taken hours/days to complete can now be done in less than 30 minutes. This session will discuss considerations to perform real time contouring, planning and patient specific QA, as well as a practical workflow and the required resources. Learning Objectives: To understand the difficulties, challenges and available technologies for online adaptive RT. To understand how to implement online adaptive therapy in a clinical environment and to understand the workflow and resources required. To understand the limitations and sources of uncertainty in the online adaptive process I have research funding from ViewRay Inc. and Philips Medical Systems.; R. Kashani, I have research funding from ViewRay Inc. and Philips Medical Systems.; X. Li, Research supported by Elekta Inc.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4957271},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: Clinical use of online adaptive replanning has been hampered by the unpractically long time required to delineate volumes based on the image of the day. The authors propose a new replanning algorithm, named gradient maintenance (GM), which does not require the delineation of organs at risk (OARs), and can enhance automation, drastically reducing planning time and improving consistency and throughput of online replanning. Methods: The proposed GM algorithm is based on the hypothesis that if the dose gradient toward each OAR in daily anatomy can be maintained the same as that in the original plan, the intended plan qualitymore » of the original plan would be preserved in the adaptive plan. The algorithm requires a series of partial concentric rings (PCRs) to be automatically generated around the target toward each OAR on the planning and the daily images. The PCRs are used in the daily optimization objective function. The PCR dose constraints are generated with dose–volume data extracted from the original plan. To demonstrate this idea, GM plans generated using daily images acquired using an in-room CT were compared to regular optimization and image guided radiation therapy repositioning plans for representative prostate and pancreatic cancer cases. Results: The adaptive replanning using the GM algorithm, requiring only the target contour from the CT of the day, can be completed within 5 min without using high-power hardware. The obtained adaptive plans were almost as good as the regular optimization plans and were better than the repositioning plans for the cases studied. Conclusions: The newly proposed GM replanning algorithm, requiring only target delineation, not full delineation of OARs, substantially increased planning speed for online adaptive replanning. The preliminary results indicate that the GM algorithm may be a solution to improve the ability for automation and may be especially suitable for sites with small-to-medium size targets surrounded by several critical structures.« less
  • Purpose: To report the application of an adaptive replanning technique for prostate cancer radiotherapy (RT), consisting of two steps: (1) segment aperture morphing (SAM), and (2) segment weight optimization (SWO), to account for interfraction variations. Methods and Materials: The new 'SAM+SWO' scheme was retroactively applied to the daily CT images acquired for 10 prostate cancer patients on a linear accelerator and CT-on-Rails combination during the course of RT. Doses generated by the SAM+SWO scheme based on the daily CT images were compared with doses generated after patient repositioning using the current planning target volume (PTV) margin (5 mm, 3 mmmore » toward rectum) and a reduced margin (2 mm), along with full reoptimization scans based on the daily CT images to evaluate dosimetry benefits. Results: For all cases studied, the online replanning method provided significantly better target coverage when compared with repositioning with reduced PTV (13% increase in minimum prostate dose) and improved organ sparing when compared with repositioning with regular PTV (13% decrease in the generalized equivalent uniform dose of rectum). The time required to complete the online replanning process was 6 {+-} 2 minutes. Conclusion: The proposed online replanning method can be used to account for interfraction variations for prostate RT with a practically acceptable time frame (5-10 min) and with significant dosimetric benefits. On the basis of this study, the developed online replanning scheme is being implemented in the clinic for prostate RT.« less
  • To introduce an approach for online adaptive replanning (i.e., dose-guided radiosurgery) in frameless stereotactic radiosurgery, when a 6-dimensional (6D) robotic couch is not available in the linear accelerator (linac). Cranial radiosurgical treatments are planned in our department using intensity-modulated technique. Patients are immobilized using thermoplastic mask. A cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan is acquired after the initial laser-based patient setup (CBCT{sub setup}). The online adaptive replanning procedure we propose consists of a 6D registration-based mapping of the reference plan onto actual CBCT{sub setup}, followed by a reoptimization of the beam fluences (“6D plan”) to achieve similar dosage as originally wasmore » intended, while the patient is lying in the linac couch and the original beam arrangement is kept. The goodness of the online adaptive method proposed was retrospectively analyzed for 16 patients with 35 targets treated with CBCT-based frameless intensity modulated technique. Simulation of reference plan onto actual CBCT{sub setup}, according to the 4 degrees of freedom, supported by linac couch was also generated for each case (4D plan). Target coverage (D99%) and conformity index values of 6D and 4D plans were compared with the corresponding values of the reference plans. Although the 4D-based approach does not always assure the target coverage (D99% between 72% and 103%), the proposed online adaptive method gave a perfect coverage in all cases analyzed as well as a similar conformity index value as was planned. Dose-guided radiosurgery approach is effective to assure the dose coverage and conformity of an intracranial target volume, avoiding resetting the patient inside the mask in a “trial and error” way so as to remove the pitch and roll errors when a robotic table is not available.« less
  • Purpose: To develop a fast replanning algorithm based on segment aperture morphing (SAM) for online replanning of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with flattening filtered (FF) and flattening filter free (FFF) beams. Methods: A software tool was developed to interface with a VMAT planning system ((Monaco, Elekta), enabling the output of detailed beam/machine parameters of original VMAT plans generated based on planning CTs for FF or FFF beams. A SAM algorithm, previously developed for fixed-beam IMRT, was modified to allow the algorithm to correct for interfractional variations (e.g., setup error, organ motion and deformation) by morphing apertures based on themore » geometric relationship between the beam's eye view of the anatomy from the planning CT and that from the daily CT for each control point. The algorithm was tested using daily CTs acquired using an in-room CT during daily IGRT for representative prostate cancer cases along with their planning CTs. The algorithm allows for restricted MLC leaf travel distance between control points of the VMAT delivery to prevent SAM from increasing leaf travel, and therefore treatment delivery time. Results: The VMAT plans adapted to the daily CT by SAM were found to improve the dosimetry relative to the IGRT repositioning plans for both FF and FFF beams. For the adaptive plans, the changes in leaf travel distance between control points were < 1cm for 80% of the control points with no restriction. When restricted to the original plans' maximum travel distance, the dosimetric effect was minimal. The adaptive plans were delivered successfully with similar delivery times as the original plans. The execution of the SAM algorithm was < 10 seconds. Conclusion: The SAM algorithm can quickly generate deliverable online-adaptive VMAT plans based on the anatomy of the day for both FF and FFF beams.« less
  • Purpose: In a situation that couch shift for patient positioning is not preferred or prohibited (e.g., MR-Linac), segment aperture morphing (SAM) can address target dislocation and deformation. For IMRT/VMAT with flattening filter free (FFF) beams, however, SAM method would lead to an adverse translational dose effect due to the beam unflattening. Here we propose a new 2-step process to address both the translational effect of FFF beams and the target deformation. Methods: The replanning method consists of an offline and an online steps. The offline step is to create a series of pre-shifted plans (PSP) obtained by a so calledmore » “warm start” optimization (starting optimization from the original plan, rather from scratch) at a series of isocenter shifts with fixed distance (e.g. 2 cm, at x,y,z = 2,0,0 ; 2,2,0 ; 0,2,0; …;− 2,0,0). The PSPs all have the same number of segments with very similar shapes, since the warm-start optimization only adjusts the MLC positions instead of regenerating them. In the online step, a new plan is obtained by linearly interpolating the MLC positions and the monitor units of the closest PSPs for the shift determined from the image of the day. This two-step process is completely automated, and instantaneously fast (no optimization or dose calculation needed). The previously-developed SAM algorithm is then applied for daily deformation. We tested the method on sample prostate and pancreas cases. Results: The two-step interpolation method can account for the adverse dose effects from FFF beams, while SAM corrects for the target deformation. The whole process takes the same time as the previously reported SAM process (5–10 min). Conclusion: The new two-step method plus SAM can address both the translation effects of FFF beams and target deformation, and can be executed in full automation requiring no additional time from the SAM process. This research was supported by Elekta inc. (Crawley, UK)« less