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Title: Long-Term Results of a Highly Performing Conformal Electron Therapy Technique for Chest Wall Irradiation After Mastectomy

Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate locoregional control and survival after mastectomy, as well as toxicity, in patients irradiated by a previously described postmastectomy highly conformal electron beam radiation therapy technique (PMERT). Methods and Materials: We included all women irradiated by postmastectomy electron beam radiation therapy for nonmetastatic breast cancer between 2007 and 2011 in our department. Acute and late toxicities were retrospectively assessed using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0 criteria. Results: Among the 796 women included, 10.1% were triple-negative, 18.8% HER2-positive, and 24.6% received neoadjuvant chemotherapy (CT). Multifocal lesions were observed in 51.3% of women, and 64.6% had at least 1 involved lymph node (LN). Internal mammary chain, supraclavicular, infraclavicular, and axillary LNs were treated in 85.6%, 88.3%, 77.9%, and 14.9% of cases, respectively. With a median follow-up of 64 months (range, 6-102 months), 5-year locoregional recurrence–free survival and overall survival were 90% (95% confidence interval 88.1%-92.4%) and 90.9% (95% confidence interval 88.9%-93%), respectively. Early skin toxicity was scored as grade 1 in 58.5% of patients, grade 2 in 35.9%, and grade 3 in 4.5%. Concomitant CT was associated with increased grade 3 toxicity (P<.001). At long-term follow-up, 29.8% of patients presented temporary or permanent hyperpigmentation or telangiectasia or fibrosis (grade 1:more » 23.6%; grade 2: 5.2%; grade 3: 1%), with higher rates among smokers (P=.06); 274 patients (34.4%) underwent breast reconstruction. Only 24 patients (3%) had early esophagitis of grade 1. Only 3 patients developed ischemic heart disease: all had been treated by anthracycline-based CT with or without trastuzumab, all had been irradiated to the left chest wall and LN, and all presented numerous cardiovascular risk factors (2-4 factors). Conclusions: This study demonstrated the good efficacy of this technique in terms of locoregional control and survival, and good short-term and long-term safety. Longer follow-up is required to analyze chronic cardiac events.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2]; ; ;  [1];  [2];  [1];  [3];  [4];  [2]; ;  [1]
  1. Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie, Paris (France)
  2. Department of Biostatistics, Institut Curie, Paris (France)
  3. Department of Surgical Oncology, Institut Curie, Paris (France)
  4. Department of Medical Oncology, Institut Curie, Paris (France)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22649924
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics; Journal Volume: 98; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2017 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; CHEMOTHERAPY; CHEST; ELECTRON BEAMS; IRRADIATION; LYMPH NODES; MAMMARY GLANDS; PATIENTS; RADIATION HAZARDS; RADIOTHERAPY; TOXICITY; WOMEN

Citation Formats

Grellier Adedjouma, Noemie, E-mail: grellier.noemie@gmail.com, Chevrier, Marion, Fourquet, Alain, Costa, Emilie, Xu, Haoping, Berger, Frederique, Campana, Francois, Laki, Fatima, Beuzeboc, Philippe, Lefeuvre, Delphine, Fournier-Bidoz, Nathalie, and Kirova, Youlia M.. Long-Term Results of a Highly Performing Conformal Electron Therapy Technique for Chest Wall Irradiation After Mastectomy. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2017.01.205.
Grellier Adedjouma, Noemie, E-mail: grellier.noemie@gmail.com, Chevrier, Marion, Fourquet, Alain, Costa, Emilie, Xu, Haoping, Berger, Frederique, Campana, Francois, Laki, Fatima, Beuzeboc, Philippe, Lefeuvre, Delphine, Fournier-Bidoz, Nathalie, & Kirova, Youlia M.. Long-Term Results of a Highly Performing Conformal Electron Therapy Technique for Chest Wall Irradiation After Mastectomy. United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2017.01.205.
Grellier Adedjouma, Noemie, E-mail: grellier.noemie@gmail.com, Chevrier, Marion, Fourquet, Alain, Costa, Emilie, Xu, Haoping, Berger, Frederique, Campana, Francois, Laki, Fatima, Beuzeboc, Philippe, Lefeuvre, Delphine, Fournier-Bidoz, Nathalie, and Kirova, Youlia M.. Mon . "Long-Term Results of a Highly Performing Conformal Electron Therapy Technique for Chest Wall Irradiation After Mastectomy". United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2017.01.205.
@article{osti_22649924,
title = {Long-Term Results of a Highly Performing Conformal Electron Therapy Technique for Chest Wall Irradiation After Mastectomy},
author = {Grellier Adedjouma, Noemie, E-mail: grellier.noemie@gmail.com and Chevrier, Marion and Fourquet, Alain and Costa, Emilie and Xu, Haoping and Berger, Frederique and Campana, Francois and Laki, Fatima and Beuzeboc, Philippe and Lefeuvre, Delphine and Fournier-Bidoz, Nathalie and Kirova, Youlia M.},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To evaluate locoregional control and survival after mastectomy, as well as toxicity, in patients irradiated by a previously described postmastectomy highly conformal electron beam radiation therapy technique (PMERT). Methods and Materials: We included all women irradiated by postmastectomy electron beam radiation therapy for nonmetastatic breast cancer between 2007 and 2011 in our department. Acute and late toxicities were retrospectively assessed using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0 criteria. Results: Among the 796 women included, 10.1% were triple-negative, 18.8% HER2-positive, and 24.6% received neoadjuvant chemotherapy (CT). Multifocal lesions were observed in 51.3% of women, and 64.6% had at least 1 involved lymph node (LN). Internal mammary chain, supraclavicular, infraclavicular, and axillary LNs were treated in 85.6%, 88.3%, 77.9%, and 14.9% of cases, respectively. With a median follow-up of 64 months (range, 6-102 months), 5-year locoregional recurrence–free survival and overall survival were 90% (95% confidence interval 88.1%-92.4%) and 90.9% (95% confidence interval 88.9%-93%), respectively. Early skin toxicity was scored as grade 1 in 58.5% of patients, grade 2 in 35.9%, and grade 3 in 4.5%. Concomitant CT was associated with increased grade 3 toxicity (P<.001). At long-term follow-up, 29.8% of patients presented temporary or permanent hyperpigmentation or telangiectasia or fibrosis (grade 1: 23.6%; grade 2: 5.2%; grade 3: 1%), with higher rates among smokers (P=.06); 274 patients (34.4%) underwent breast reconstruction. Only 24 patients (3%) had early esophagitis of grade 1. Only 3 patients developed ischemic heart disease: all had been treated by anthracycline-based CT with or without trastuzumab, all had been irradiated to the left chest wall and LN, and all presented numerous cardiovascular risk factors (2-4 factors). Conclusions: This study demonstrated the good efficacy of this technique in terms of locoregional control and survival, and good short-term and long-term safety. Longer follow-up is required to analyze chronic cardiac events.},
doi = {10.1016/J.IJROBP.2017.01.205},
journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics},
number = 1,
volume = 98,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
  • Purpose: To analyze the results of a Phase III clinical trial that investigated whether a hyperfractionated radiotherapy (RT) schedule could reduce the risk of locoregional recurrence in patients with locally advanced breast cancer treated with chemotherapy and mastectomy. Methods and Materials: Between 1985 and 1989, 200 patients with clinical Stage III noninflammatory breast cancer were enrolled in a prospective study investigating neoadjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapy. Of the 179 patients treated with mastectomy after neoadjuvant chemotherapy, 108 participated in a randomized component of the trial that compared a dose-escalated, hyperfractionated (twice-daily, b.i.d.) chest wall RT schedule (72 Gy in 1.2-Gy b.i.d.more » fractions) with a once-daily (q.d.) schedule (60 Gy in 2-Gy q.d. fractions). In both arms of the study, the supraclavicular fossa and axillary apex were treated once daily to 50 Gy. The median follow-up period was 15 years. Results: The 15-year actuarial locoregional recurrence rate was 7% for the q.d. arm and 12% for the b.i.d. arm (p = 0.36). The rates of severe acute toxicity were similar (4% for q.d. vs. 5% for b.i.d.), but moist desquamation developed in 42% of patients in the b.i.d. arm compared with 28% of the patients in the q.d. arm (p = 0.16). The 15-year actuarial rate of severe late RT complications did not differ between the two arms (6% for q.d. vs. 11% for b.i.d., p = 0.54). Conclusion: Although the sample size of this study was small, we found no evidence that this hyperfractionation schedule of postmastectomy RT offered a clinical advantage. Therefore, we have concluded that it should not be further studied in this cohort of patients.« less
  • Purpose: Electron beam radiotherapy of the chest wall with or without lymph node irradiation has been used at the Institut Curie for >20 years. The purpose of this report was to show the latest improvements of our technique developed to avoid hot spots and improve the homogeneity. Methods and Materials: The study was split into two parts. A new electron irradiation technique was designed and compared with the standard one (dosimetric study). The dose distributions were calculated using our treatment planning software ISIS (Technologie Diffusion). The dose calculation was performed using the same calculation parameters for the new and standardmore » techniques. Next, the early skin toxicity of our new technique was evaluated prospectively in the first 25 patients using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria (clinical study). Results: The maximal dose found on the five slices was 53.4 {+-} 1.1 Gy for the new technique and 59.1 {+-} 2.3 Gy for the standard technique. The hot spots of the standard technique plans were situated at the overlap between the internal mammary chain and chest wall fields. The use of one unique field that included both chest wall and internal mammary chain volumes solved the problem of junction. To date, 25 patients have been treated with the new technique. Of these patients, 12% developed Grade 0, 48% Grade 1, 32% Grade 2, and 8% Grade 3 toxicity. Conclusions: This report describes an improvement in the standard postmastectomy electron beam technique of the chest wall. This new technique provides improved target homogeneity and conformality compared with the standard technique. This treatment was well tolerated, with a low rate of early toxicity events.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate two dose optimization strategies for maintaining target volume coverage of inversely-planned post mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) plans during patient motion. Methods: Five patients previously treated with VMAT for PMRT at our clinical were randomly selected for this study. For each patient, two plan optimization strategies were compared. Plan 1 was optimized to a volume that included the physician’s planning target volume (PTV) plus an expansion up to 0.3 cm from the bolus surface. Plan 2 was optimized to the PTV plus an expansion up to 0.3 cm from the patient surface (i.e., not extending into the bolus). VMATmore » plans were optimized to deliver 95% of the prescription to 95% of the PTV while sparing organs at risk based on clinical dose limits. PTV coverage was then evaluated following the simulation of patient shifts by 1.0 cm in the anterior and posterior directions using the treatment planning system. Results: Posterior patient shifts produced a difference in D95% of around 11% in both planning approaches from the non-shifted dose distributions. Coverage of the medial and lateral borders of the evaluation volume was reduced in both the posteriorly shifted plans (Plan 1 and Plan 2). Anterior patient shifts affected Plan 2 more than Plan 1 with a difference in D95% of 1% for Plan 1 versus 6% for Plan 2 from the non-shifted dose distributions. The least variation in PTV dose homogeneity for both shifts was obtained with Plan 1. However, all posteriorly shifted plans failed to deliver 95% of the prescription to 95% of the PTV. Whereas, only a few anteriorly shifted plans failed this criteria. Conclusion: The results of this study suggest both planning volume methods are sensitive to patient motion, but that a PTV extended into a bolus volume is slightly more robust for anterior patient shifts.« less
  • A-mode ultrasound is used in a procedure to construct individualized tissue compensating bolus for electron beam irradiation of the chest wall, where the thickness of tissues over the lung may vary by as much as 3 cm. Electron energies corresponding to the thickest tissues in the field would normally cause lung tissues beneath the thinner regions to receive the full tumor dose. The problem is made more serious by the fact that electron ranges in lung are 2-3 times greater than in muscle. We feel that some form of individualized compensation is necessary for patients with large variations in chestmore » wall thickness within a given electron treatment field. The A-Scan procedure is particularly suited to deliniation of the pleura-lung interface because of the strong identifiable reflection from this discontinuity. In the first approach, a moldable gelatanous bolus material, mixed to transmit ultrasound at 5 MHz with a velocity equal to the speed of sound in muscle, is placed on the chest wall covering the entire field. The thickness of the compensating material is then reduced at each point in the field so that the total thickness (muscle plus compensator) indicated by the A-scan is everywhere the same as the chosen maximum treatment depth. Because the compensator has nearly the same electron stopping power as muscle, the compensated chest wall is now uniform in thickness over the entire field. In the second approach, we sacrifice the one-step advantages of using sonically transparent compensator material in order to obtain a more rugged and rapid setting compensator. Four patients have been treated with no evidence of pneumonitis. The more elegant combination of these two approaches awaits the development of rugged materials which are both quick setting and sonically transparent.« less
  • Purpose: Breast cancer patients who undergo a mastectomy often require post-mastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) due to high risk disease characteristics. PMRT usually accompanies scar boost irradiation (10–16Gy in 5–8 fractions) using en face electrons, which often results in increased dose to the underlying lungs, thereby potentially increasing the risk of radiation pneumonitis. Hence, this study evaluated water-equivalent phantoms as energy degraders and as an alternative to a bolus to reduce radiation dose to the underlying lungs for electron scar boost irradiation. Methods: Percent depth dose (PDD) profiles of 6 MeV (the lowest electron energy available in most clinics) were obtainedmore » without and with commercial solid water phantoms (1 to 5mm by 1mm increments) placed on top of electron cones. Phantom attenuation was measured by taking a ratio of outputs with to without the phantoms in 10×10cm2 cone size for monitor unit (MU) calculation. In addition, scatter dose to contralateral breast was measured on a human-like phantom using two selected scar (short and long) boost patient setups. Results: The PDD plots showed that the solid water phantoms and the bolus had similar dosimetric effects for the same thickness. Lower skin dose (up to 3%) to ipsilateral breast was observed with a 5mm phantom compared with a 5mm bolus (up to 10%) for all electron cones. Phantom attenuation was increased by 50% with about a 4.5mm phantom. Also, the energy degraders caused scatter dose to contralateral breast by a factor of 3 with a 5mm phantom. Conclusion: Our results demonstrate the feasibility of using water-equivalent phantoms to reduce lung dose using en face electrons in patients with a thin chest wall undergoing PMRT. The disadvantages of this treatment approach (i.e., the increase in MUs and treatment time, and clinically insignificant scatter dose to the contralateral breast given usually 10Gy) are outweighed by its above clinical benefits.« less