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Title: Dry Eye Syndrome After Proton Therapy of Ocular Melanomas

Abstract

Purpose: To investigate whether proton therapy (PT) performs safely in superotemporal melanomas, in terms of risk of dry-eye syndrome (DES). Methods and Materials: Tumor location, DES grade, and dose to ocular structures were analyzed in patients undergoing PT (2005-2015) with 52 Gy (prescribed dose, not accounting for biologic effectiveness correction of 1.1). Prognostic factors of DES and severe DES (sDES, grades 2-3) were determined with Cox proportional hazard models. Visual acuity deterioration and enucleation rates were compared by sDES and tumor locations. Results: Median follow-up was 44 months (interquartile range, 18-60 months). Of 853 patients (mean age, 64 years), 30.5% had temporal and 11.4% superotemporal tumors. Five-year incidence of DES and sDES was 23.0% (95% confidence interval [CI] 19.0%-27.7%) and 10.9% (95% CI 8.2%-14.4%), respectively. Multivariable analysis showed a higher risk for sDES in superotemporal (hazard ratio [HR] 5.82, 95% CI 2.72-12.45) and temporal tumors (HR 2.63, 95% CI 1.28-5.42), age ≥70 years (HR 1.90, 95% CI 1.09-3.32), distance to optic disk ≥5 mm (HR 2.71, 95% CI 1.52-4.84), ≥35% of retina receiving 12 Gy (HR 2.98, 95% CI 1.54-5.77), and eyelid rim irradiation (HR 2.68, 95% CI 1.49-4.80). The same risk factors were found for DES. Visual acuity deteriorated more in patients with sDES (0.86 ± 1.10 vs 0.64 ± 0.98more » logMAR, P=.034) but not between superotemporal/temporal and other locations (P=.890). Enucleation rates were independent of sDES (P=.707) and tumor locations (P=.729). Conclusions: Severe DES was more frequent in superotemporal/temporal melanomas. Incidence of vision deterioration and enucleation was no higher in patients with superotemporal melanoma than in patients with tumors in other locations. Tumor location should not contraindicate PT.« less

Authors:
 [1]; ;  [2];  [1];  [2];  [1];  [3];  [2]
  1. Proton Therapy Unit, Department of Radiation Therapy, Centre Antoine Lacassagne, Nice (France)
  2. Department of Ophthalmology, Pasteur 2 Hospital, Eye University Clinic, Nice (France)
  3. Department of Biostatistics, Institut de Cancérologie de Lorraine, Vandoeuvre les Nancy (France)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22649917
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics; Journal Volume: 98; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2017 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; EYES; GY RANGE 10-100; MELANOMAS; PATIENTS; PLATINUM; PROTON BEAMS; RADIOTHERAPY

Citation Formats

Thariat, Juliette, E-mail: jthariat@gmail.com, Maschi, Celia, Lanteri, Sara, Peyrichon, Marie Laure, Baillif, Stephanie, Herault, Joel, Salleron, Julia, and Caujolle, Jean Pierre. Dry Eye Syndrome After Proton Therapy of Ocular Melanomas. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2017.01.199.
Thariat, Juliette, E-mail: jthariat@gmail.com, Maschi, Celia, Lanteri, Sara, Peyrichon, Marie Laure, Baillif, Stephanie, Herault, Joel, Salleron, Julia, & Caujolle, Jean Pierre. Dry Eye Syndrome After Proton Therapy of Ocular Melanomas. United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2017.01.199.
Thariat, Juliette, E-mail: jthariat@gmail.com, Maschi, Celia, Lanteri, Sara, Peyrichon, Marie Laure, Baillif, Stephanie, Herault, Joel, Salleron, Julia, and Caujolle, Jean Pierre. 2017. "Dry Eye Syndrome After Proton Therapy of Ocular Melanomas". United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2017.01.199.
@article{osti_22649917,
title = {Dry Eye Syndrome After Proton Therapy of Ocular Melanomas},
author = {Thariat, Juliette, E-mail: jthariat@gmail.com and Maschi, Celia and Lanteri, Sara and Peyrichon, Marie Laure and Baillif, Stephanie and Herault, Joel and Salleron, Julia and Caujolle, Jean Pierre},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To investigate whether proton therapy (PT) performs safely in superotemporal melanomas, in terms of risk of dry-eye syndrome (DES). Methods and Materials: Tumor location, DES grade, and dose to ocular structures were analyzed in patients undergoing PT (2005-2015) with 52 Gy (prescribed dose, not accounting for biologic effectiveness correction of 1.1). Prognostic factors of DES and severe DES (sDES, grades 2-3) were determined with Cox proportional hazard models. Visual acuity deterioration and enucleation rates were compared by sDES and tumor locations. Results: Median follow-up was 44 months (interquartile range, 18-60 months). Of 853 patients (mean age, 64 years), 30.5% had temporal and 11.4% superotemporal tumors. Five-year incidence of DES and sDES was 23.0% (95% confidence interval [CI] 19.0%-27.7%) and 10.9% (95% CI 8.2%-14.4%), respectively. Multivariable analysis showed a higher risk for sDES in superotemporal (hazard ratio [HR] 5.82, 95% CI 2.72-12.45) and temporal tumors (HR 2.63, 95% CI 1.28-5.42), age ≥70 years (HR 1.90, 95% CI 1.09-3.32), distance to optic disk ≥5 mm (HR 2.71, 95% CI 1.52-4.84), ≥35% of retina receiving 12 Gy (HR 2.98, 95% CI 1.54-5.77), and eyelid rim irradiation (HR 2.68, 95% CI 1.49-4.80). The same risk factors were found for DES. Visual acuity deteriorated more in patients with sDES (0.86 ± 1.10 vs 0.64 ± 0.98 logMAR, P=.034) but not between superotemporal/temporal and other locations (P=.890). Enucleation rates were independent of sDES (P=.707) and tumor locations (P=.729). Conclusions: Severe DES was more frequent in superotemporal/temporal melanomas. Incidence of vision deterioration and enucleation was no higher in patients with superotemporal melanoma than in patients with tumors in other locations. Tumor location should not contraindicate PT.},
doi = {10.1016/J.IJROBP.2017.01.199},
journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics},
number = 1,
volume = 98,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 5
}
  • Purpose: In parapapillary melanoma patients, radiation-induced optic complications are frequent and visual acuity is often compromised. We investigated dose-effect relationships for the optic nerve with respect to visual acuity after proton therapy. Methods and Materials: Of 5205 patients treated between 1991 and 2014, those treated using computed tomography (CT)-based planning to 52 Gy (prescribed dose, not accounting for relative biologic effectiveness correction of 1.1) in 4 fractions, with minimal 6-month follow-up and documented initial and last visual acuity, were included. Deterioration of ≥0.3 logMAR between initial and last visual acuity results was reported. Results: A total of 865 consecutive patients weremore » included. Median follow-up was 69 months, mean age was 61.7 years, tumor abutted the papilla in 35.1% of patients, and tumor-to-fovea distance was ≤3 mm in 74.2% of patients. Five-year relapse-free survival rate was 92.7%. Visual acuity was ≥20/200 in 72.6% of patients initially and 47.2% at last follow-up. A wedge filter was used in 47.8% of the patients, with a positive impact on vision and no impact on relapse. Glaucoma, radiation-induced optic neuropathy, maculopathy were reported in 17.9%, 47.5%, and 33.6% of patients, respectively. On multivariate analysis, age, diabetes, thickness, initial visual acuity and percentage of macula receiving 26 Gy were predictive of visual acuity. Furthermore, patients irradiated to ≥80% of their papilla had better visual acuity when limiting the 50% (30-Gy) and 20% (12-Gy) isodoses to ≤2 mm and 6 mm of optic nerve length, respectively. Conclusions: A personalized proton therapy plan with optic nerve and macular sparing can be used efficiently with good oncological and functional results in parapapillary melanoma patients.« less
  • Proximity to the disc and fovea is a risk factor for visual loss after proton beam irradiation of uveal melanomas. Of 562 eyes treated over a 10-year period with pretreatment visual acuity of 20/200 or better, 363 (64.6%) contained tumors within 2 disc diameters (DD) of the disc or fovea. Rates of visual loss after treatment to worse than 20/200 and causes of visual decline were evaluated using Kaplan-Meier analysis. Cumulative rates of visual loss among subjects with tumors near the disc or fovea were 33 and 47% 1 and 2 years after treatment compared to 17 and 28%, respectively,more » for subjects with tumors located farther from both structures. The leading cause of visual loss in the first year among eyes with tumors near the disc or fovea was retinal detachment. Controlling for other predictors of visual loss to worse than 20/200, location near the disc or fovea was independently related to visual loss primarily due to retinal detachment, cataract, and radiation retinopathy. Despite the unfavorable location of these tumors, over half of patients with 20/200 or better pretreatment visual acuity had useful vision 2 years after treatment.« less
  • Forty-four uveal melanomas were evaluated for patterns of tumor regression after proton beam irradiation. All tumors were followed for a minimum of ten months after treatment. Seven lesions completely disappeared, 33 have decreased in size, and 4 remained unchanged. Associated signs of tumor regression were: resolution of the secondary serous retinal detachments, central apical yellow discoloration of the tumor, destruction of the tumor's vasculature, and elimination of fluorescein leakage. This study demonstrated that regression after proton beam irradiation is a relatively slow process, and the effects of radiation could be observed in some cases more than a year after treatment.