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Title: Dry Eye Syndrome After Proton Therapy of Ocular Melanomas

Abstract

Purpose: To investigate whether proton therapy (PT) performs safely in superotemporal melanomas, in terms of risk of dry-eye syndrome (DES). Methods and Materials: Tumor location, DES grade, and dose to ocular structures were analyzed in patients undergoing PT (2005-2015) with 52 Gy (prescribed dose, not accounting for biologic effectiveness correction of 1.1). Prognostic factors of DES and severe DES (sDES, grades 2-3) were determined with Cox proportional hazard models. Visual acuity deterioration and enucleation rates were compared by sDES and tumor locations. Results: Median follow-up was 44 months (interquartile range, 18-60 months). Of 853 patients (mean age, 64 years), 30.5% had temporal and 11.4% superotemporal tumors. Five-year incidence of DES and sDES was 23.0% (95% confidence interval [CI] 19.0%-27.7%) and 10.9% (95% CI 8.2%-14.4%), respectively. Multivariable analysis showed a higher risk for sDES in superotemporal (hazard ratio [HR] 5.82, 95% CI 2.72-12.45) and temporal tumors (HR 2.63, 95% CI 1.28-5.42), age ≥70 years (HR 1.90, 95% CI 1.09-3.32), distance to optic disk ≥5 mm (HR 2.71, 95% CI 1.52-4.84), ≥35% of retina receiving 12 Gy (HR 2.98, 95% CI 1.54-5.77), and eyelid rim irradiation (HR 2.68, 95% CI 1.49-4.80). The same risk factors were found for DES. Visual acuity deteriorated more in patients with sDES (0.86 ± 1.10 vs 0.64 ± 0.98more » logMAR, P=.034) but not between superotemporal/temporal and other locations (P=.890). Enucleation rates were independent of sDES (P=.707) and tumor locations (P=.729). Conclusions: Severe DES was more frequent in superotemporal/temporal melanomas. Incidence of vision deterioration and enucleation was no higher in patients with superotemporal melanoma than in patients with tumors in other locations. Tumor location should not contraindicate PT.« less

Authors:
 [1]; ;  [2];  [1];  [2];  [1];  [3];  [2]
  1. Proton Therapy Unit, Department of Radiation Therapy, Centre Antoine Lacassagne, Nice (France)
  2. Department of Ophthalmology, Pasteur 2 Hospital, Eye University Clinic, Nice (France)
  3. Department of Biostatistics, Institut de Cancérologie de Lorraine, Vandoeuvre les Nancy (France)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22649917
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics; Journal Volume: 98; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2017 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; EYES; GY RANGE 10-100; MELANOMAS; PATIENTS; PLATINUM; PROTON BEAMS; RADIOTHERAPY

Citation Formats

Thariat, Juliette, E-mail: jthariat@gmail.com, Maschi, Celia, Lanteri, Sara, Peyrichon, Marie Laure, Baillif, Stephanie, Herault, Joel, Salleron, Julia, and Caujolle, Jean Pierre. Dry Eye Syndrome After Proton Therapy of Ocular Melanomas. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2017.01.199.
Thariat, Juliette, E-mail: jthariat@gmail.com, Maschi, Celia, Lanteri, Sara, Peyrichon, Marie Laure, Baillif, Stephanie, Herault, Joel, Salleron, Julia, & Caujolle, Jean Pierre. Dry Eye Syndrome After Proton Therapy of Ocular Melanomas. United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2017.01.199.
Thariat, Juliette, E-mail: jthariat@gmail.com, Maschi, Celia, Lanteri, Sara, Peyrichon, Marie Laure, Baillif, Stephanie, Herault, Joel, Salleron, Julia, and Caujolle, Jean Pierre. Mon . "Dry Eye Syndrome After Proton Therapy of Ocular Melanomas". United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2017.01.199.
@article{osti_22649917,
title = {Dry Eye Syndrome After Proton Therapy of Ocular Melanomas},
author = {Thariat, Juliette, E-mail: jthariat@gmail.com and Maschi, Celia and Lanteri, Sara and Peyrichon, Marie Laure and Baillif, Stephanie and Herault, Joel and Salleron, Julia and Caujolle, Jean Pierre},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To investigate whether proton therapy (PT) performs safely in superotemporal melanomas, in terms of risk of dry-eye syndrome (DES). Methods and Materials: Tumor location, DES grade, and dose to ocular structures were analyzed in patients undergoing PT (2005-2015) with 52 Gy (prescribed dose, not accounting for biologic effectiveness correction of 1.1). Prognostic factors of DES and severe DES (sDES, grades 2-3) were determined with Cox proportional hazard models. Visual acuity deterioration and enucleation rates were compared by sDES and tumor locations. Results: Median follow-up was 44 months (interquartile range, 18-60 months). Of 853 patients (mean age, 64 years), 30.5% had temporal and 11.4% superotemporal tumors. Five-year incidence of DES and sDES was 23.0% (95% confidence interval [CI] 19.0%-27.7%) and 10.9% (95% CI 8.2%-14.4%), respectively. Multivariable analysis showed a higher risk for sDES in superotemporal (hazard ratio [HR] 5.82, 95% CI 2.72-12.45) and temporal tumors (HR 2.63, 95% CI 1.28-5.42), age ≥70 years (HR 1.90, 95% CI 1.09-3.32), distance to optic disk ≥5 mm (HR 2.71, 95% CI 1.52-4.84), ≥35% of retina receiving 12 Gy (HR 2.98, 95% CI 1.54-5.77), and eyelid rim irradiation (HR 2.68, 95% CI 1.49-4.80). The same risk factors were found for DES. Visual acuity deteriorated more in patients with sDES (0.86 ± 1.10 vs 0.64 ± 0.98 logMAR, P=.034) but not between superotemporal/temporal and other locations (P=.890). Enucleation rates were independent of sDES (P=.707) and tumor locations (P=.729). Conclusions: Severe DES was more frequent in superotemporal/temporal melanomas. Incidence of vision deterioration and enucleation was no higher in patients with superotemporal melanoma than in patients with tumors in other locations. Tumor location should not contraindicate PT.},
doi = {10.1016/J.IJROBP.2017.01.199},
journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics},
number = 1,
volume = 98,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
  • Purpose: To investigate the incidence of severe dry eye syndrome (DES) after external beam radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer and its dependence on the parameters relevant to external beam radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The present retrospective study included 78 patients treated for primary extracranial head-and-neck tumors between 1965 and 2000, whose lacrimal apparatus/entire globe was exposed to fractionated external beam radiotherapy. The dose received by the major lacrimal gland was used for analysis. The end point of the present study was the ophthalmologic diagnosis of severe DES leading to vision compromise. Results: Of the 78 patients, 40 developed severe DES leadingmore » to visual compromise. The incidence of DES increased steadily from 6% at 35-39.99 Gy to 50% at 45-49.99 Gy and 90% at 60-64.99 Gy. With a mean of 0.9 years (range, 1 month to 3 years), the latency of DES was observed to be a function of the total dose and the dose per fraction. On univariate and multivariate analysis, the total dose (p < .0001 and p < .0001, respectively) and dose per fraction (p {<=} .0001 and p = .0044, respectively) were significant. However, age, gender, and the use of chemoradiotherapy were not. The actuarial analysis indicated a 5-year probability of freedom from DES of 93% for doses <45 Gy, 29% for 45-59.9 Gy, and 3% doses {>=}60 Gy. A logistic normal tissue complication probability model fit to our data obtained a dose of 34 and 38 Gy corresponding to a 5% and 10% incidence of DES. Conclusion: With a dose of 34 Gy corresponding to a 5% incidence of DES, the risk of severe DES increased, and the latency decreased with an increase in the total dose and dose per fraction to the lacrimal gland. The effect of chemoradiotherapy and hyperfractionation on the risk of DES needs additional investigation.« less
  • There are limited data in the literature on the probability of dry-eye complications according to radiotherapy dose. This study investigates the risk of radiation-induced severe dry-eye syndrome in patients in whom an entire orbit was exposed to fractionated external beam irradiation. Between October 1964 and May 1989, 33 patients with extracranial head and neck tumors received irradiation of an entire orbit. Most patients were treated with {sup 60}Co. The dose to the lacrimal apparatus was calculated at a depth of 1 cm from the anterior skin surface, the approximate depth of the major lacrimal gland. The end point of themore » study was severe dry-eye syndrome sufficient to produce visual loss secondary to corneal opacification, ulceration, or vascularization. Twenty patients developed severe dry-eye syndrome. All 17 patients who received dose {ge}57Gy developed severe dry-eye syndrome. Three (19%) of 16 patients who received doses {ge}45 Gy developed severe dry-eye syndrome; injuries in the latter group were much more slower to develop (4 to 11 years) than in the higher dose group, in whom corneal vascularization and opacification were usually pronounced within 9-10 months. There were no data for the range of doses between 45.01 and 56.99 Gy. The data did not suggest an increased risk of severe dry-eye syndrome with increasing age. Data from the current series and the literature are combined to construct a sigmoid dose response curve. The incidence of injury increases from 0% reported after doses {ge}30 Gy to 100% after doses {ge}57 Gy. 13 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.« less
  • Purpose: In parapapillary melanoma patients, radiation-induced optic complications are frequent and visual acuity is often compromised. We investigated dose-effect relationships for the optic nerve with respect to visual acuity after proton therapy. Methods and Materials: Of 5205 patients treated between 1991 and 2014, those treated using computed tomography (CT)-based planning to 52 Gy (prescribed dose, not accounting for relative biologic effectiveness correction of 1.1) in 4 fractions, with minimal 6-month follow-up and documented initial and last visual acuity, were included. Deterioration of ≥0.3 logMAR between initial and last visual acuity results was reported. Results: A total of 865 consecutive patients weremore » included. Median follow-up was 69 months, mean age was 61.7 years, tumor abutted the papilla in 35.1% of patients, and tumor-to-fovea distance was ≤3 mm in 74.2% of patients. Five-year relapse-free survival rate was 92.7%. Visual acuity was ≥20/200 in 72.6% of patients initially and 47.2% at last follow-up. A wedge filter was used in 47.8% of the patients, with a positive impact on vision and no impact on relapse. Glaucoma, radiation-induced optic neuropathy, maculopathy were reported in 17.9%, 47.5%, and 33.6% of patients, respectively. On multivariate analysis, age, diabetes, thickness, initial visual acuity and percentage of macula receiving 26 Gy were predictive of visual acuity. Furthermore, patients irradiated to ≥80% of their papilla had better visual acuity when limiting the 50% (30-Gy) and 20% (12-Gy) isodoses to ≤2 mm and 6 mm of optic nerve length, respectively. Conclusions: A personalized proton therapy plan with optic nerve and macular sparing can be used efficiently with good oncological and functional results in parapapillary melanoma patients.« less