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Title: Safety and Efficacy of Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy for Renal Cell Carcinoma Extracranial Metastases

Abstract

Purpose: Renal cell carcinoma is refractory to conventional radiation therapy but responds to higher doses per fraction. However, the dosimetric data and clinical factors affecting local control (LC) are largely unknown. We aimed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SAbR) for extracranial renal cell carcinoma metastases. Methods and Materials: We reviewed 175 metastatic lesions from 84 patients treated with SAbR between 2005 and 2015. LC and toxicity after SAbR were assessed with Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) version 1.1 and Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) version 4.0. Predictors of local failure were analyzed with χ{sup 2}, Kaplan-Meier, and log-rank tests. Results: In most cases (74%), SAbR was delivered with total doses of 40 to 60 Gy, 30 to 54 Gy, and 20 to 40 Gy in 5 fractions, 3 fractions, and a single fraction, respectively. The median biologically effective dose (BED) using the universal survival model was 134.5 Gy. The 1-year LC rate after SAbR was 91.2% (95% confidence interval, 84.9%-95.0%; median follow-up, 16.7 months). Local failures were associated with prior radiation therapy (hazard ratio [HR], 10.49; P<.0001), palliative-intent radiation therapy (HR, 4.63; P=.0189), spinal location (HR, 5.36; P=.0041), previous systemic therapy status (0-1 vs >1; HR, 3.52;more » P=.0217), and BED <115 Gy (HR, 3.45; P=.0254). Dose received by 99% of the target volume was the strongest dosimetric predictor for LC. Upon multivariate analysis, dose received by 99% of the target volume greater than BED of 98.7 Gy and systemic therapy status remained significant (HR, 0.12 and 3.64, with P=.0014 and P=.0472, respectively). Acute and late grade 3 toxicities attributed to SAbR were observed in 3 patients (1.7%) and 5 patients (2.9%), respectively. Conclusions: SAbR demonstrated excellent LC of metastatic renal cell carcinoma with a favorable safety profile when an adequate dose and coverage were applied. Multimodality treatment with surgery should be considered for reirradiation or vertebral metastasis. A higher radiation dose may be required in patients who received previous systemic therapies.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1]; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;  [3];  [4]; ; ; ;  [5];  [3];  [1];  [3];  [1] more »;  [2];  [3]; « less
  1. Kidney Cancer Program, Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States)
  2. (United States)
  3. Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States)
  4. Department of Radiology, Advanced Imaging Research Center, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States)
  5. Department of Urology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22649911
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics; Journal Volume: 98; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2017 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; CARCINOMAS; DOSIMETRY; GY RANGE 100-1000; GY RANGE 10-100; KIDNEYS; MULTIVARIATE ANALYSIS; PATIENTS; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOTHERAPY

Citation Formats

Wang, Chiachien Jake, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, Christie, Alana, Lin, Mu-Han, Jung, Matthew, Weix, Derek, Huelsmann, Lorel, Kuhn, Kristin, Meyer, Jeffrey, Desai, Neil, Kim, D. W. Nathan, Pedrosa, Ivan, Margulis, Vitaly, Cadeddu, Jeffrey, Sagalowsky, Arthur, Gahan, Jeffrey, Laine, Aaron, Xie, Xian-Jin, Choy, Hak, Brugarolas, James, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, Timmerman, Robert, and and others. Safety and Efficacy of Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy for Renal Cell Carcinoma Extracranial Metastases. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2017.01.032.
Wang, Chiachien Jake, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, Christie, Alana, Lin, Mu-Han, Jung, Matthew, Weix, Derek, Huelsmann, Lorel, Kuhn, Kristin, Meyer, Jeffrey, Desai, Neil, Kim, D. W. Nathan, Pedrosa, Ivan, Margulis, Vitaly, Cadeddu, Jeffrey, Sagalowsky, Arthur, Gahan, Jeffrey, Laine, Aaron, Xie, Xian-Jin, Choy, Hak, Brugarolas, James, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, Timmerman, Robert, & and others. Safety and Efficacy of Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy for Renal Cell Carcinoma Extracranial Metastases. United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2017.01.032.
Wang, Chiachien Jake, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, Christie, Alana, Lin, Mu-Han, Jung, Matthew, Weix, Derek, Huelsmann, Lorel, Kuhn, Kristin, Meyer, Jeffrey, Desai, Neil, Kim, D. W. Nathan, Pedrosa, Ivan, Margulis, Vitaly, Cadeddu, Jeffrey, Sagalowsky, Arthur, Gahan, Jeffrey, Laine, Aaron, Xie, Xian-Jin, Choy, Hak, Brugarolas, James, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, Timmerman, Robert, and and others. 2017. "Safety and Efficacy of Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy for Renal Cell Carcinoma Extracranial Metastases". United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2017.01.032.
@article{osti_22649911,
title = {Safety and Efficacy of Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy for Renal Cell Carcinoma Extracranial Metastases},
author = {Wang, Chiachien Jake and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas and Christie, Alana and Lin, Mu-Han and Jung, Matthew and Weix, Derek and Huelsmann, Lorel and Kuhn, Kristin and Meyer, Jeffrey and Desai, Neil and Kim, D. W. Nathan and Pedrosa, Ivan and Margulis, Vitaly and Cadeddu, Jeffrey and Sagalowsky, Arthur and Gahan, Jeffrey and Laine, Aaron and Xie, Xian-Jin and Choy, Hak and Brugarolas, James and Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas and Timmerman, Robert and and others},
abstractNote = {Purpose: Renal cell carcinoma is refractory to conventional radiation therapy but responds to higher doses per fraction. However, the dosimetric data and clinical factors affecting local control (LC) are largely unknown. We aimed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SAbR) for extracranial renal cell carcinoma metastases. Methods and Materials: We reviewed 175 metastatic lesions from 84 patients treated with SAbR between 2005 and 2015. LC and toxicity after SAbR were assessed with Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) version 1.1 and Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) version 4.0. Predictors of local failure were analyzed with χ{sup 2}, Kaplan-Meier, and log-rank tests. Results: In most cases (74%), SAbR was delivered with total doses of 40 to 60 Gy, 30 to 54 Gy, and 20 to 40 Gy in 5 fractions, 3 fractions, and a single fraction, respectively. The median biologically effective dose (BED) using the universal survival model was 134.5 Gy. The 1-year LC rate after SAbR was 91.2% (95% confidence interval, 84.9%-95.0%; median follow-up, 16.7 months). Local failures were associated with prior radiation therapy (hazard ratio [HR], 10.49; P<.0001), palliative-intent radiation therapy (HR, 4.63; P=.0189), spinal location (HR, 5.36; P=.0041), previous systemic therapy status (0-1 vs >1; HR, 3.52; P=.0217), and BED <115 Gy (HR, 3.45; P=.0254). Dose received by 99% of the target volume was the strongest dosimetric predictor for LC. Upon multivariate analysis, dose received by 99% of the target volume greater than BED of 98.7 Gy and systemic therapy status remained significant (HR, 0.12 and 3.64, with P=.0014 and P=.0472, respectively). Acute and late grade 3 toxicities attributed to SAbR were observed in 3 patients (1.7%) and 5 patients (2.9%), respectively. Conclusions: SAbR demonstrated excellent LC of metastatic renal cell carcinoma with a favorable safety profile when an adequate dose and coverage were applied. Multimodality treatment with surgery should be considered for reirradiation or vertebral metastasis. A higher radiation dose may be required in patients who received previous systemic therapies.},
doi = {10.1016/J.IJROBP.2017.01.032},
journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics},
number = 1,
volume = 98,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 5
}
  • Purpose: To report tumor local progression-free outcomes after treatment with single-dose, image-guided, intensity-modulated radiotherapy and hypofractionated regimens for extracranial metastases from renal cell primary tumors. Patients and Methods: Between 2004 and 2010, 105 lesions from renal cell carcinoma were treated with either single-dose, image-guided, intensity-modulated radiotherapy to a prescription dose of 18-24 Gy (median, 24) or hypofractionation (three or five fractions) with a prescription dose of 20-30 Gy. The median follow-up was 12 months (range, 1-48). Results: The overall 3-year actuarial local progression-free survival for all lesions was 44%. The 3-year local progression-free survival for those who received a highmore » single-dose (24 Gy; n = 45), a low single-dose (<24 Gy; n = 14), or hypofractionation regimens (n = 46) was 88%, 21%, and 17%, respectively (high single dose vs. low single dose, p = .001; high single dose vs. hypofractionation, p < .001). Multivariate analysis revealed the following variables were significant predictors of improved local progression-free survival: 24 Gy dose compared with a lower dose (p = .009) and a single dose vs. hypofractionation (p = .008). Conclusion: High single-dose, image-guided, intensity-modulated radiotherapy is a noninvasive procedure resulting in high probability of local tumor control for metastatic renal cell cancer generally considered radioresistant according to the classic radiobiologic ranking.« less
  • Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine outcomes of patients with node-negative medically inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) whose primary tumors exceeded 5 cm and were treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: We surveyed our institutional prospective lung SBRT registry to identify treated patients with tumors >5 cm. Treatment outcomes for local control (LC), locoregional control (LRC), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) were assessed by Kaplan-Meier estimates. Toxicities were graded according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4. Mean pretreatment pulmonary function test values were compared to mean posttreatment values. Results:more » From December 2003 to July 2014, 40 patients met study criteria. Median follow-up was 10.8 months (range: 0.4-70.3 months). Median age was 76 years (range: 56-90 years), median body mass index was 24.3 (range: 17.7-37.2), median Karnofsky performance score was 80 (range: 60-90), and median Charlson comorbidity index score was 2 (range: 0-5). Median forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) was 1.41 L (range: 0.47-3.67 L), and median diffusion capacity (DLCO) was 47% of predicted (range: 29%-80%). All patients were staged by fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography staging, and 47.5% underwent mediastinal staging by endobronchial ultrasonography. Median tumor size was 5.6 cm (range: 5.1-10 cm), median SBRT dose was 50 Gy (range: 30-60 Gy) in 5 fractions (range: 3-10 fractions). Eighteen-month LC, LRC, DFS, and OS rates were 91.2%, 64.4%, 34.6%, and 59.7%, respectively. Distant failure was the predominant pattern of failure (32.5%). Three patients (7.5%) experienced grade 3 or higher toxicity. Mean posttreatment FEV1 was not significantly reduced (P=.51), but a statistically significant absolute 6.5% (P=.03) reduction in DLCO was observed. Conclusions: Lung SBRT for medically inoperable node-negative NSCLC with primary tumors larger than 5 cm is safe and provides excellent local control with limited toxicity. The predominant pattern of failure in this population was distant failure.« less
  • Stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) for primary renal cell carcinoma (RCC) targets requires motion management strategies to verify dose delivery. This case study highlights the effect of a change in patient breathing amplitude on the dosimetry to organs at risk and target structures. A 73-year-old male patient was planned for receiving 26 Gy of radiation in 1 fraction of SABR for a left primary RCC. The patient was simulated with four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) and the tumor internal target volume (ITV) was delineated using the 4DCT maximum intensity projection. However, the initially planned treatment was abandoned at the radiation oncologist'smore » discretion after pretreatment cone-beam CT (CBCT) motion verification identified a greater than 50% reduction in superior to inferior diaphragm motion as compared with the planning 4DCT. This patient was resimulated with respiratory coaching instructions. To assess the effect of the change in breathing on the dosimetry to the target, each plan was recalculated on the data set representing the change in breathing condition. A change from smaller to larger breathing showed a 46% loss in planning target volume (PTV) coverage, whereas a change from larger breathing to smaller breathing resulted in an 8% decrease in PTV coverage. ITV coverage was similarly reduced by 8% in both scenarios. This case study highlights the importance of tools to verify breathing motion prior to treatment delivery. 4D image guided radiation therapy verification strategies should focus on not only verifying ITV margin coverage but also the effect on the surrounding organs at risk.« less
  • Purpose: Stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) is increasingly used to treat lung oligometastases. We set out to determine the safety and efficacy of this approach and to identify factors associated with outcomes. Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective study of patients treated with SABR for metastatic lung tumors at our institution from 2003 to 2014. We assessed the association between various patient and treatment factors with local failure (LF), progression, subsequent treatment, systemic treatment, and overall survival (OS), using univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: We identified 122 tumors in 77 patients meeting inclusion criteria for this study. Median follow-upmore » was 22 months. The 12- and 24-month cumulative incidence rates of LF were 8.7% and 16.2%, respectively; the 24-month cumulative incidence rates of progression, subsequent treatment, and subsequent systemic treatment were 75.2%, 64.5%, and 35.1%, respectively. Twenty-four-month OS was 74.6%, and median OS was 36 months. Colorectal metastases had a significantly higher cumulative incidence of LF at 12 and 24 months (25.5% and 42.2%, respectively), than all other histologies (4.4% and 9.9%, respectively; P<.0004). The 24-month cumulative incidences of LF for colorectal metastases treated with a biologically effective dose at α/β = 10 (BED{sub 10}) of <100 Gy versus BED{sub 10} of ≥100 Gy were 62.5% and 16.7%, respectively (P=.08). Toxicity was minimal, with only a single grade 3 or higher event observed. Conclusions: SABR for metastatic lung tumors appears to be safe and effective with excellent local control, treatment-free intervals, and OS. An exception is metastases from colorectal cancer, which have a high LF rate consistent with a radioresistant phenotype, suggesting a potential role for dose escalation.« less
  • Purpose: To assess the association between colorectal cancer (CRC) histology, dose, and local failure (LF) after stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) for pulmonary metastases, and to describe subsequent cancer progression, change of systemic therapy (CST), survival, and their association with treatment indications. Methods and Materials: From a prospective SABR cohort, 180 pulmonary metastases in 120 patients were identified. Treatment indications were single metastasis, oligometastases, oligoprogression, and dominant areas of progression. Doses of 48 to 52 Gy/4 to 5 fractions were delivered. Since 2010 the dose for peripheral CRC metastases was increased to 60 Gy/4 fractions. Cumulative incidence function (CIF) was used tomore » report LF, progression probability, and CST. The Kaplan-Meier method estimated overall survival (OS). Univariate and multivariable analyses to assess variable associations were conducted. Results: Median follow-up was 22 months (interquartile range, 14-33 months). At 24 months, the CIF of LF was 23.6% (95% confidence interval [CI] 15.1%-33.3%) and 8.3% (95% CI 2.6%-18.6%), respectively, for CRC and non-CRC metastases (P<.001). This association remained significant after adjusting for confounders (subdistribution hazard ratio [SHR] 13.6, 95% CI 4.2-44.1, P<.001). Among CRC metastases, 56 and 45 received <60 Gy and 60 Gy, respectively. Delivering 60 Gy was independently associated with a lower hazard of LF (SHR 0.271, 95% CI 0.078-0.940, P=.040). At 12 months the CIF of progression was 41.67% (95% CI 21.69%-60.56%), 42.51% (95% CI 29.09%-55.29%), 62.96% (95% CI 41.25%-78.53%), and 78.57% (95% CI 42.20%-93.48%), respectively, for patients treated for single metastasis, oligometastases, oligoprogression, and dominant area of progression (P<.001). A CST was observed, respectively, in 4 (17%), 17 (31%), 12 (44%), and 10 (71%) patients with a median time of 13.1, 11.1, 8.4, and 8.4 months. Conclusion: Colorectal cancer lung metastases are associated with a higher hazard of LF and require higher SABR doses. Outcomes for patients with oligometastases and oligoprogression treated with SABR seem favorable. Prospective clinical trials are needed to confirm these benefits.« less